South Carolina elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of South Carolina held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate Defeatedd Preview Article
U.S. House (7 seats) Approveda
State Executives Defeatedd N/A
State Senate (46 seats) Approveda Preview Article
State House (124 seats) Approveda
Ballot measures (

1 measures)

Approveda Preview Article

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

[edit]

See also: United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina, 2012


Members of the U.S. House from South Carolina -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 1 1
     Republican Party 5 6
Total 6 7
District General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
1st Democratic Party Bobbie Rose
Republican Party Timothy Scott
Libertarian PartyKeith Blandford
Tim Scott Republican Party Timothy Scott No
2nd Republican Party Joe Wilson Joe Wilson Republican Party Joe Wilson No
3rd Democratic Party Brian Doyle
Republican Party Jeff Duncan
Jeff Duncan Republican Party Jeff Duncan No
4th Democratic Party Deb Morrow
Republican Party Trey Gowdy
Green Party Jeff Sumerel
Trey Gowdy Republican Party Trey Gowdy No
5th Democratic Party Joyce Knott
Republican Party Mick Mulvaney
Mick Mulvaney Republican Party Mick Mulvaney No
6th Democratic Party James Clyburn
Green PartyNammu Y Muhammad
Jim Clyburn Democratic Party James Clyburn No
7th Democratic Party Gloria Bromell Tinubu
Republican Party Tom Rice
New District Republican Party Tom Rice N/A

See also: South Carolina State Senate elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state senate.

South Carolina State Senate
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 19 18
     Republican Party 27 28
Total 46 46


See also: South Carolina House of Representatives elections, 2012

Heading into the election, Republicans maintained partisan control in the state house.

South Carolina House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 46 46
     Republican Party 76 76
Total 124 124

See also: South Carolina 2012 ballot measures
Type Title Subject Description Result
LRCA Amendment 1 Admin of gov't Requires governor to select running mate for lt. governor. Approveda

Eligibility to Vote

South Carolina

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

South Carolina is one of 16 states to use an open primary system. In a runoff election, however, voters must stick with the same party they voted in for the first round of elections that year. Voters were required to register to vote in the primary by May 12, 2012, which is 31 days before the primary took place.[1] (Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote is 31 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 6.[2][3]

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

Voters are eligible to vote absentee in an election if they cannot make it to the polls on election day for one of the following reasons:[5]

  • Students attending school outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
  • Members of the Armed Forces or Merchant Marine serving outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
  • Persons serving with the American Red Cross or with the United Service Organizations (USO) who are attached to and serving with the Armed Forces outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
  • Persons who, for reasons of employment, will not be able to vote on election day
  • Physically disabled persons
  • Government employees serving outside their county of residence on Election Day and their spouses and dependents residing with them
  • Persons with a death or funeral in the family within three days before the election
  • Persons who plan to be on vacation outside their county of residence on Election Day
  • Certified poll watchers, poll managers, and county election officials working on Election Day
  • Overseas Citizens
  • Persons attending sick or physically disabled persons
  • Persons admitted to the hospital as emergency patients on Election Day or within a four-day period before the election
  • Persons serving as a juror in state or federal court on Election Day
  • Persons sixty-five years of age or older
  • Persons confined to a jail or pre-trial facility pending disposition of arrest or trial

Deadlines

To vote absentee, a request must be received no later than 5 p.m. on the fourth day prior to the election. The ballot must then be returned by 7 p.m. on election day.[5]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

South Carolina is one of eight states that allow early voting but require an excuse to vote early. Early voting begins as soon as ballots become available and ends at 5 p.m. the day prior to election day.[6][7]

To vote early you need to provide an excuse for why you will be unable to vote at the polls during normal voting hours. Falling into any of the following categories is a valid reason:

  • a student away at college (or a spouse or dependent residing with the student)
  • a member of the Armed Forces, Merchant Marines, Red Cross, USO, government employees, or a spouse or dependent residing with such a person
  • a person with a job that prevents you from voting in person on election day
  • physically disabled
  • away on vacation on election day
  • 65 or older
  • confined to a jail or pre-trial facility pending disposition of arrest or trial
  • attending sick or physically disabled persons
  • on jury duty in state or federal court on election day
  • a certified poll watchers or poll managers

See also

References