South Dakota Gambling in Deadwood, Amendment Q (2014)

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Amendment Q
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Type:Constitutional amendment
Constitution:South Dakota Constitution
Referred by:South Dakota Legislature
Topic:Gambling on the ballot
Status:On the ballot
2014 measures
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November 4
Initiated Measure 17
Initiated Measure 18
Amendment Q
Polls

The South Dakota Gambling in Deadwood, Amendment Q is on the November 4, 2014 ballot in South Dakota as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. The measure, upon voter approval, would permit the state legislature to authorize roulette, keno, craps, limited card games and slot machines within the municipal limits of Deadwood in Lawrence County, South Dakota. All municipal revenues derived from casinos would continue to be allocated towards the Historic Restoration and Preservation of Deadwood. A sixty percent supermajority approval by local voters would no longer be required under the amendment.[1]

Currently, roulette, keno and craps are not permitted, but limited card games and slot machines are in Deadwood, South Dakota. Also, a sixty percent supermajority vote by city voters is currently required to approve a piece of legislation allowing a gambling facility.

The amendment was introduced into the South Dakota Legislature as House Joint Resolution 1001.[2]

Text of measure

Constitutional changes

The proposed amendment would amend Section 25 of Article III of the Constitution of South Dakota:[1]

§ 25. Games of Chance Prohibited--Exceptions.
The Legislature shall not authorize any game of chance, lottery, or gift enterprise, under any pretense, or for any purpose whatever provided, however, it shall be lawful for the Legislature to authorize by law, bona fide veterans, charitable, educational, religious or fraternal organizations, civic and service clubs, volunteer fire departments, or such other public spirited organizations as it may recognize, to conduct games of chance when the entire net proceeds of such games of chance are to be devoted to educational, charitable, patriotic, religious, or other public spirited uses. However, it shall be lawful for the Legislature to authorize by law a state lottery or video games of chance, or both, which are regulated by the state of South Dakota, either separately by the state or jointly with one or more states, and which are owned and operated by the state of South Dakota, either separately by the state or jointly with one or more states or persons, provided any such video games of chance shall not directly dispense coins or tokens. However, the Legislature shall not expand the statutory authority existing as of June 1, 1994, regarding any private ownership of state lottery games or video games of chance, or both. The Legislature shall establish the portion of proceeds due the state from such lottery or video games of chance, or both, and the purposes for which those proceeds are to be used. SDCL 42-7A, and its amendments, regulations, and related laws, and all acts and contracts relying for authority upon such laws and regulations, beginning July 1, 1987, to the effective date of this amendment, are ratified and approved. Further, it shall be lawful for the Legislature to authorize by law, roulette, keno, craps, limited card games and slot machines within the city limits of Deadwood, provided that 60% of the voters of the City of Deadwood approve legislatively authorized card games and slot machines at an election called for such purpose. The entire net Municipal proceeds of such card games and slot machines shall be devoted to the Historic Restoration and Preservation of Deadwood.[3]


Background

The Permit Gambling in Deadwood Amendment was approved by voters in 1988. Casinos became operational in Deadwood on November 1, 1989. Casino revenues more than doubled from $25.6 million in 1990 to $56.6 million in 1991. By 2009, casino revenues peaked in Deadwood at $111 million. Since 2009, revenues have been between $104.3 million and $110.8 million. The proposed amendment would allow keno, craps and roulette. The reasoning for adding these three games is to jumpstart revenue growth.[4]

Support

Supporters

Officials

The following officials sponsored the amendment in the legislature:[2]

Other officials who support the amendment include:

Organizations

  • Deadwood Gaming Association[4]

Path to the ballot

See also: Amending the South Dakota Constitution

The proposed amendment required simple majority approval in both chambers of the South Dakota Legislature. HJR 1001 was approved by the South Dakota House on January 30, 2014. The legislation was approved by the South Dakota Senate on March 5, 2014. The amendment was delivered to the secretary of state on March 12, 2014.[2]

House vote

January 30, 2014 House vote

South Dakota HJR 1001 House Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 37 55.22%
No3044.78%


Senate vote

March 5, 2014 Senate vote

South Dakota HJR 1001 Senate Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 25 71.43%
No1028.57%

Similar measures

See also

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