State Legislative Tracker: Mississippi passes controversial bill

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April 7, 2014

Edited by Joel Williams
This week’s tracker includes a look at a controversial new law in Mississippi.

Weekly highlight

Last week, Alabama, Mississippi and South Dakota adjourned their legislative sessions. Here is a brief look at issues making headlines across the country:

  • Mississippi: Last week, Mississippi lawmakers passed Senate Bill 2681, dubbed the "Religious Freedom and Restoration Act." Under the "Religious Freedom Restoration Act," businesses are allowed to discriminate for religious reasons. This bill passed by a vote of 78-43 in the House and 38-14 in the Senate. The legislation is similar to Arizona's "Religious Liberty" bill that was vetoed by Gov. Jan Brewer in February. Andy Gipson (R), chair of the House Judiciary Committee, said, "This has been passed by 18 other states, and has been in federal law for years and years with no issues, no discrimination. It does not discriminate, but what it does do is protect people from discrimination, religious people in the state of Mississippi." Opponents of the bill say they are worried that it allows for discrimination against certain groups of people. Sarah Warbelow, Human Rights Campaign’s state legislative director, voiced her concern: "Before Mississippi has had the opportunity to robustly discuss the lived experiences of LGBT people, this bill would hollow out any non-discrimination protections at the local level or possible future state-wide protections. Just as we've seen in other states, this bill is bad for business, bad for the state’s reputation, and most of all, bad for Mississippians. Gov. Bryant must veto the measure." On April 3, 2014, Gov. Phil Bryant (R) signed the bill into law. The law will go into effect on July 1.[1][2][3][4]
  • Missouri: The chair of the Missouri House Judiciary Committee said last week that he will give a hearing to each of three filings of articles of impeachment against Gov. Jay Nixon (D). Stanley Cox (R) told Missourinet that he would allow the articles to be heard if their sponsors so desire. HR 380 would impeach Nixon for an executive order allowing for joint tax returns by same-sex couples who were married out-of-state. HR 476 charges Nixon with failing to call special elections for vacant House seats in a timely fashion. Lastly, HR 923 claims that executive officials violated the Missouri Constitution by providing personal documents of concealed-carry license applicants to the federal government. The respective sponsors, Nick Marshall, Mike Moon and Rick Brattin, all Republicans who have co-sponsored each other's articles, are on record as wanting a hearing. Marshall added, "Not only do I want a hearing, I think it’s important that it be a candid hearing, an open hearing and a hearing that is free from any interference." Cox expressed caution, however, saying that removing Nixon from office "would [require] some clear information and evidence to support the accusation that they have violated their oath to the Constitution or the law in some way." Brattin and Marshall have been critical of the slow movement of the articles, which were planned last fall and filed throughout February and March. House Speaker Tim Jones (R) said last month that leadership was looking to "move them forward in the right way." In the event that an article of impeachment passes the House, a seven-member panel picked by the Senate would then try Nixon. Republicans hold a 108-52 majority in the House.[5][6][7][8]
  • Tennessee: The nearly 60-year-old law in Tennessee that allows for forced annexation throughout the state has reached a "major milestone" in becoming obsolete. Rep. Mike Carter (R) and Sen. Bo Watson (R) are sponsors of the bill that will require referendum voting by residence and property owners of an area to be annexed. A referendum will not be required in an area where the majority of the residence are petitioning for annexation. Seventy representatives signed on as co-sponsors of the bill. The House passed the bill in an 87-8 vote in February, while the Senate voted 27-1 to approve the bill at the end of March. The bill now goes to Gov. Bill Haslam's (R) desk. A city planner for Cleveland, Tennessee, argued that a forced annexation that was recently put on hold because of the proposed bill would have saved residents over $300 a year. Homeowner Association President William Brown, however, said that annexation would have cost more per year. According to Mayor Andy Berke's spokeswoman, the new bill will only impact future attempts for annexation. Tennessee is one of only three states in the U.S. that currently allows for municipalities to annex properties without landowners' consent.[9][10][11][12]
[edit]

As of today, April 7, 2014, the following figures represent the cumulative partisan breakdown of the 50 state senates and 49 state houses. In the 50 states, Republicans currently control 51.8% of all seats while Democrats hold 46.5%. All told, Republicans control 57 chambers while Democrats are the majority in 41 chambers. One chambers is nonpartisan.

Representation in 50 State Legislatures
Party Number of Percentage
Democratic state legislators 3,435 46.5%
Republican state legislators 3,830 51.8%
Independent (and nonpartisan) state legislators 66 0.89%
Third party (and non-voting) legislators 12 0.16%
Vacancies 42 0.57%

State Senates

The partisan composition of state senates refers to which political party holds the majority of seats in the state senate. Altogether, in the 50 state senates, there are 1,972 state senators.

As of April 7, 2014, the breakdown of chamber control by party is as follows:

See also: Partisan composition of state houses

Cumulative numbers

As of December 1, 2014, 1,902 state senators are affiliated with either the Republican or Democratic parties. This total is updated monthly.

Party Number of Percentage
Democratic state senators 861 43.6%
Republican state senators 1,041 52.8%
Nonpartisan state senators 49 2.48%
Independent state senators 4 0.2%
Third Party state senators 2 0.1%
Vacancies 15 0.76%

Vacancies

As of December 1, 2014, there are 15 vacancies in 12 states. This total is updated monthly.

State Vacancies
Arkansas 2
California 1
Florida 1
Mississippi 1
Missouri 2
New Hampshire 1
New York 2
Pennsylvania 1
Texas 1
Utah 1
Virginia 1
Wisconsin 1

Independents

As of December 1, 2014, there are 6 state senators in 5 states identifying as independents or parties other than Democratic and Republican. This total is updated monthly.

State Independents/Third Party
Alabama 1 (Independent)
Kentucky 1 (Independent)
Maine 1 (Independent)
Rhode Island 1 (Independent)
Vermont 2 (Vermont Progressive)

State Houses

The partisan composition of state houses refers to which party holds the majority of seats in the state house or the lower level of each state legislature. Altogether, in the 49 state houses, there are 5,411 state representatives.

As of April 7, 2014, the breakdown of chamber control by party is as follows:

  • Democratic Party 20 chambers
  • Republican Party 29 chambers

Cumulative numbers

As of December 1, 2014, 5,338 state representatives are affiliated with either the Republican or Democratic parties. This total is updated monthly.

Party Number of Percentage
Democratic state representatives 2,535 46.9%
Republican state representatives 2,803 51.8%
Independent state representatives 12 0.22%
Third party representatives 6 0.11%
Vacancies 51 0.94%

Vacancies

As of December 1, 2014, there are 51 state house vacancies in 18 different states. This total is updated monthly.

State Vacancies
California 1
Florida 4
Georgia 1
Illinois 1
Indiana 1
Maine 2
Massachusetts 6
Missouri 2
Nevada 1
New Hampshire 14
New York 11
North Dakota 1
Ohio 1
Pennsylvania 1
Texas 1
Vermont 1
Virginia 1
Washington 1

Independents

As of December 1, 2014, there are 18 state representatives in 6 states identifying as independents or parties other than Democratic and Republican. Three members of the Maine House of Representatives are non-voting Native American representatives. This total is updated monthly.

State Independents/Third Party
Arkansas 1 (Green)
Georgia 1 (Independent)
Louisiana 2 (Independent)
Maine 7 (3 non-voting Native American representatives, 4 Independent)
Michigan 1 (Independent)
Vermont 9 (5 Vermont Progressive Party, 4 Independent)

Regular sessions

Current sessions capture for the week of April 7, 2014
See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions
Click here to see a chart of each state's 2014 session information.

Currently 24 out of 50 state legislatures are meeting in regular session. Two states, Virginia and Wisconsin, are in special session.

The following states have convened their 2014 regular session:[13]

The following states have adjourned their 2014 regular session:[14]

Special sessions

Snapshot of State Legislatures:
Saturday, December 20, 2014
There are 7,383 Total State Legislators
Total Democratic state legislators 3,327 (45.1%)
Total Republican state legislators 3,951 (53.5%)
There are 99 Total State Legislative Chambers
Total Democratic Party-controlled chambers 41
Total Republican Party-controlled chambers 57
Total tied or nonpartisan chambers 1
2014 Session Information
Total Special Elections 22
Total Special Sessions 2
Virginia

The Virginia State Legislature is meeting in special session to try and pass an estimated $96 billion budget for the next two years. The session is not expected to end quickly, as Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) and the Republican-led House disagree over whether the state should accept further Medicaid funding from the federal government. This special session is required as the legislature failed to pass a budget during the yearly regular session. Should no agreement be reached by July 1, Virginia's government could shut down.[15]

Wisconsin

Gov. Scott Walker (R) called the legislature into special session on January 22. Walker asked the legislature to find a way to fund $500 million worth of property and income tax cuts.[16]

In recess

As of today, April 7, there are four state legislatures currently in recess:[17]

See also: State legislative elections, 2014

A total of 87 of the 99 chambers will hold state legislative elections on November 4, 2014.

The 87 chambers with elections in 2014 are in 46 states. They are:

The Kansas, Minnesota, New Mexico and South Carolina senates also typically hold elections in odd years. However, senators are elected to 4-year terms in those states and those will not be up for election again until 2015.

1090 of the country's 1,972 state senate seats are up for re-election in November 2014, and 4,958 of the country's 5,415 state house seats are up for re-election. Altogether, 6,048 of the country's 7,387 state legislative seats are up for re-election on November 4, 2014.

Primary Information

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2014 state legislative elections

The state legislative filing deadlines and primary dates are as follows:

Note: Ballot access is a complicated issue. The dates in the table below are primarily for candidates filing for access to the primary. For more detailed information about each state's qualification requirements -- including all relevant ballot access dates for the primary and general election -- click to our detailed pages in the state column.

2014 State Legislative Primary Information
State Filing Deadline Primary Date Days from Deadline to Primary
Alabama Red padlock.png 2/7/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 116
Alaska Red padlock.png 6/2/2014[18] Red padlock.png 8/19/2014 78
Arizona Red padlock.png 5/28/2014[19] Red padlock.png 8/26/2014 90
Arkansas Red padlock.png 3/3/2014[20][21] Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 78
California Red padlock.png 3/7/2014[22][23][24] Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 88
Colorado Red padlock.png 3/31/2014[25][26] Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 85
Connecticut Red padlock.png 6/10/2014[27] Red padlock.png 8/12/2014 90
Delaware Red padlock.png 7/8/2014 Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 63
Florida Red padlock.png 6/20/2014[28][29] Red padlock.png 8/26/2014 67
Georgia Red padlock.png 3/7/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 74
Hawaii Red padlock.png 6/3/2014[30] Red padlock.png 8/9/2014 67
Idaho Red padlock.png 3/14/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 78
Illinois Red padlock.png 12/2/2013 Red padlock.png 3/18/2014 106
Indiana Red padlock.png 2/7/2014 Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 88
Iowa Red padlock.png 3/14/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 81
Kansas Red padlock.png 6/2/2014 Red padlock.png 8/5/2014 65
Kentucky Red padlock.png 1/28/2014[31][32] Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 112
Maine Red padlock.png 3/17/2014[33] Red padlock.png 6/10/2014 85
Maryland Red padlock.png 2/25/2014[34] Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 119
Massachusetts Red padlock.png 6/3/2014[35] Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 98
Michigan Red padlock.png 4/22/2014 Red padlock.png 8/5/2014 105
Minnesota Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 Red padlock.png 8/12/2014 70
Missouri Red padlock.png 3/25/2014 Red padlock.png 8/5/2014 133
Montana Red padlock.png 3/10/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 85
Nebraska Red padlock.png 3/3/2014[36] Red padlock.png 5/13/2014 85
Nevada Red padlock.png 3/14/2014 Red padlock.png 6/10/2014 88
New Hampshire Red padlock.png 6/13/2014 Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 88
New Mexico Red padlock.png 2/4/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 119
New York Red padlock.png 7/10/2014 Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 61
North Carolina Red padlock.png 2/28/2014 Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 67
North Dakota Red padlock.png 4/7/2014 Red padlock.png 6/10/2014 64
Ohio Red padlock.png 2/5/2014 Red padlock.png 5/6/2014 90
Oklahoma Red padlock.png 4/11/2014 Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 74
Oregon Red padlock.png 3/11/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 70
Pennsylvania Red padlock.png 3/11/2014 Red padlock.png 5/20/2014 70
Rhode Island Red padlock.png 6/25/2014 Red padlock.png 9/9/2014 76
South Carolina Red padlock.png 3/30/2014 Red padlock.png 6/10/2014 72
South Dakota Red padlock.png 3/25/2014 Red padlock.png 6/3/2014 70
Tennessee Red padlock.png 4/3/2014 Red padlock.png 8/7/2014 126
Texas Red padlock.png 12/9/2013 Red padlock.png 3/4/2014 85
Utah Red padlock.png 3/20/2014 Red padlock.png 6/24/2014 96
Vermont Red padlock.png 6/12/2014 Red padlock.png 8/26/2014 75
Washington Red padlock.png 5/17/2014 Red padlock.png 8/5/2014 80
West Virginia Red padlock.png 1/25/2014 Red padlock.png 5/13/2014 108
Wisconsin Red padlock.png 6/2/2014 Red padlock.png 8/12/2014 71
Wyoming Red padlock.png 5/30/2014 Red padlock.png 8/19/2014 81


SLP badge.png
See also: State legislative special elections, 2014

There are two special elections scheduled this week: one each in Florida and Connecticut.

April 8, 2014

Florida House of Representatives District 44

See also: Florida state legislative special elections, 2014

Eric Eisnaugle (R) defeated Shaun Raja (D) in the special election, which took place on April 8.[37][38] Raja was unopposed in the March 11 Democratic primary, while Eisnaugle defeated Stephen Vincent Facella in the March 11 Republican primary.[39][40]

Eisnaugle, a state representative from 2008-2012, chose not to run for re-election in 2012 when redistricting drew him against fellow Rep. Stephen Precourt (R). With Precourt term-limited in 2014, Eisnaugle planned to run for the seat again. Several Republicans, including Speaker Steve Crisafulli (R), backed Eisnaugle. "Eric’s track record of leadership will allow him to serve his Orange County constituents well. It is obvious that his message of job growth and fiscal responsibility resonated with the voters of his district." Crisafulli said.[41]

The seat was vacant following Stephen Precourt's (R) appointment as the head of the Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority.[42]

A special election for the position of Florida House of Representatives District 44 was called for April 8, with a primary if necessary on March 11. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 23.[43]

Florida House of Representatives, District 44, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngEric Eisnaugle 74.2% 6,983
     Democratic Shaun Raja 25.8% 2,429
Total Votes 9,412

April 8 Special election candidates:

Democratic Party Shaun Raja
Republican Party Eric Eisnaugle

April 11, 2014

Connecticut House of Representatives District 61

See also: Connecticut state legislative special elections, 2014

Tami Zawistowski (R) defeated Pete Hill (D) in the special election, which took place on April 11.[39][37][44]

The seat was vacant following Elaine O'Brien's (D) death.[45]

A special election for the position of Connecticut House of Representatives District 61 was called for April 11. Candidates were nominated by their party rather than chosen through a primary.[45]

Connecticut House of Representatives, District 61, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTami Zawistowski 58% 1,975
     Democratic Pete Hill 42% 1,428
Total Votes 3,403


April 11 Special election candidates:

Democratic Party Pete Hill
Republican Party Tami Zawistowski

Recent election results

April 2, 2014

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Alabama House of Representatives District 53

See also: Alabama state legislative special elections, 2014

Anthony "Alann" Johnson (D) defeated Willie "W.A." Casey (R) in the special election, which took place on April 1.[37][46] Johnson, Arthur D. Shores Lee, Demetrius C. Newton Jr. and Frank Topping faced off in the Democratic primary.[47] As no candidate received more than fifty percent of the vote, the top-two vote-getters - Johnson and Lee - met in the Democratic primary runoff on February 4, which Johnson won.[48] Casey was unopposed in the Republican primary.[39]

The seat was vacant following Demetrius Newton's (D) death on September 11, 2013.[49]

A special election for the position of Alabama House of Representatives District 53 was initially called for January 28, with a primary on December 3, 2013. Because a runoff on January 28, 2014, was required, the special election was scheduled to take place on March 25 instead. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was October 10, 2013.[49] Due to inclement weather, the runoff was pushed back a week to February 4. The special election instead took place on April 1.[50]

Alabama House of Representatives, District 53, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAnthony "Alann" Johnson 68.1% 320
     Republican Willie "W.A." Casey 31.9% 150
Total Votes 470

April 1 Special election candidates:

Democratic Party Anthony "Alann" Johnson Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Willie "W.A." Casey

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Massachusetts State Senate Fifth Middlesex District

See also: Massachusetts state legislative special elections, 2014

Jason M. Lewis (D) defeated Monica C. Medeiros (R) in the special election, which took place on April 1.[37][51] Lewis defeated Christopher G. Fallon and Anthony V. Guardia in the Democratic primary, while Medeiros was unopposed in the Republican primary.[39][52]

The seat was vacant following Katherine Clark's (D) election to Massachusetts' Fifth Congressional District.

A special election for the position of Massachusetts State Senate Fifth Middlesex District was called for April 1, with a primary on March 4. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 28.[53]

Massachusetts State Senate, Fifth Middlesex District, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJason M. Lewis 53.2% 10,611
     Republican Monica C. Medeiros 46.8% 9,321
Total Votes 19,932
April 1 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Jason M. Lewis Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Monica C. Medeiros

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Massachusetts State Senate Fifth Middlesex District

See also: Massachusetts state legislative special elections, 2014

Jason M. Lewis (D) defeated Monica C. Medeiros (R) in the special election, which took place on April 1.[37][51] Lewis defeated Christopher G. Fallon and Anthony V. Guardia in the Democratic primary, while Medeiros was unopposed in the Republican primary.[39][52]

The seat was vacant following Katherine Clark's (D) election to Massachusetts' Fifth Congressional District.

A special election for the position of Massachusetts State Senate Fifth Middlesex District was called for April 1, with a primary on March 4. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 28.[53]

Massachusetts State Senate, Fifth Middlesex District, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJason M. Lewis 53.2% 10,611
     Republican Monica C. Medeiros 46.8% 9,321
Total Votes 19,932
April 1 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Jason M. Lewis Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Monica C. Medeiros

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Massachusetts House of Representatives Fourth Hampden District

See also: Massachusetts state legislative special elections, 2014

John C. Velis (D) defeated Dan Allie (R) in the special election, which took place on April 1. Velis was unopposed in the Democratic primary, while Allie was unopposed in the Republican primary.[39][37][54]

The seat was vacant following Donald F. Humason, Jr.'s (R) election to the Massachusetts State Senate.[55]

A special election for the position of Massachusetts House of Representatives Fourth Hampden District was called for April 1, with a primary on March 4. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 28.[55]

Massachusetts House of Representatives, Fourth Hampden District, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn C. Velis 53.4% 2,697
     Republican Dan Allie 46.6% 2,354
Total Votes 5,051
April 1 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party John C. Velis Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Dan Allie

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Massachusetts House of Representatives Second Suffolk District

See also: Massachusetts state legislative special elections, 2014

Daniel Joseph Ryan defeated Roy A. Avellaneda and Christopher Remmes in the Democratic primary[56] and was unopposed in the special election, which took place on April 1.[39][37][57]

The seat was vacant following Eugene O'Flaherty's (D) appointment as Boston's corporation counsel.[49]

A special election for the position of Massachusetts House of Representatives Second Suffolk District was called for April 1, with a primary on March 4. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 28.[49]

Massachusetts House of Representatives, Second Suffolk District Special Election Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDaniel Joseph Ryan 58.9% 2,291
Roy A. Avellaneda 29.8% 1,161
Christopher Remmes 11.3% 438
Total Votes 3,890
April 1 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Daniel Joseph Ryan Green check mark transparent.png

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Massachusetts House of Representatives Thirteenth Suffolk District

See also: Massachusetts state legislative special elections, 2014

Daniel J. Hunt defeated Liam P. Curran, Gene I. Gorman, Paul L. Mccann, Jr. and John K. O’Toole in the Democratic primary[58] and was unopposed in the special election, which took place on April 1.[39][37][59]

The seat was vacant following Martin Walsh's (D) election as Mayor of Boston.[60]

A special election for the position of Massachusetts House of Representatives Thirteenth Suffolk District was called for April 1, with a primary on March 4. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 28.[37]

Massachusetts House of Representatives, Thirteenth Suffolk District Special Election Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDaniel J. Hunt 49.9% 2,338
John K. O’Toole 23.1% 1,082
Liam P. Curran 19% 892
Paul L. Mccann, Jr. 5% 233
Gene I. Gorman 3% 141
Total Votes 4,686
April 1 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party Daniel J. Hunt Green check mark transparent.png

CheckedBoxOffset.jpg Massachusetts House of Representatives Sixteenth Suffolk District

See also: Massachusetts state legislative special elections, 2014

RoseLee Vincent (D) defeated Todd B. Taylor (R) in the special election, which took place on April 1.[37][61] Vincent defeated Joshua D. Monahan and Linda S. Rosa in the Democratic primary, while Taylor was unopposed in the Republican primary.[39][62]

The seat was vacant following Kathi-Anne Reinstein's (D) resignation to become the Government Affairs Manager for the Boston Beer Company.[49]

A special election for the position of Massachusetts House of Representatives Sixteenth Suffolk District was called for April 1, with a primary on March 4. The filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was January 28.[49]

Massachusetts House of Representatives, Sixteenth Suffolk District, Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRoseLee Vincent 67.9% 1,586
     Republican Todd B. Taylor 32.1% 749
Total Votes 2,335
April 1 Special election candidates:
Democratic Party RoseLee Vincent Green check mark transparent.png
Republican Party Todd B. Taylor

Looking ahead

Upcoming special elections include:

  • April 24: Connecticut House of Representatives District 94
  • April 29: Massachusetts House of Representatives Fifth Suffolk District
  • May 10: Texas State Senate District 4

See also

References

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  2. latimes.com, "Religious freedom bill passes in Mississippi; gays worry," accessed April 4, 2014
  3. huffingtonpost.com, "Mississippi Governor Signs Anti-Gay Bill," accessed April 4, 2014
  4. rt.com, "Mississippi Legislature passes bill allowing legal discrimination on basis of religion," accessed April 4, 2014
  5. Missourinet, "Chairman: impeachment efforts will get a hearing," April 1, 2014
  6. The Associated Press, "Missouri House panel takes up Nixon impeachment articles over gay marriage, guns and special elections," March 31, 2014
  7. Advocate.com, "Mo. Rep. Seeks to Impeach Gov. for Authorizing Gay Tax Returns," November 20, 2013
  8. Missourinet, "House Republican ‘appalled’ by lack of action on impeachment filings against Gov. Nixon," March 13, 2014
  9. The Tennessean, "Annexations by TN cities would require voters' OK," February 21, 2014
  10. timesfreepress.com, "Tennessee annexation bill heads to state Senate," February 26, 2014
  11. WRCB TV, "Tennessee's nearly 60-year-old annexation laws could soon be obsolete," April 2, 2014
  12. WRCB TV "Tennessee's forced annexation law reaches major milestone," April 3, 2014
  13. Stateside Associates, " Session Calendar 2014," accessed April 7, 2014
  14. Stateside Associates, " Session Calendar 2014," accessed April 7, 2014
  15. wjla.com, "Virginia General Assembly returns for special session," March 23, 2014
  16. Wisconsin Governor's Office, "Governor Scott Walker Calls Special Session, Calls on Legislators to Pass the Blueprint for Prosperity," January 23, 2014
  17. StateNet, " Daily Session Summary," accessed March 31, 2014
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  23. California Elections Code, "Section 8100-8107," accessed October 28, 2013
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  37. 37.0 37.1 37.2 37.3 37.4 37.5 37.6 37.7 37.8 Orlando Sentinel "Eric Eisnaugle wins special election in Florida House District 44," April 8, 2014
  38. Florida Department of State, "Official special election results," accessed May 7, 2014
  39. 39.0 39.1 39.2 39.3 39.4 39.5 39.6 39.7 Florida Secretary of State, "Official candidate list," accessed January 24, 2014
  40. sunshinestatenews.com, "Eric Eisnaugle Closer to Tallahassee Return After Big Primary Win," March 11, 2014
  41. sunshinestatenews.com, "Eric Eisnaugle Breezes Back to Florida House after Stunning Special Election Victory," April 8, 2014
  42. Orlando Sentinel, "Special election set to replace Steve Precourt in Florida House," January 12, 2014
  43. Florida Department of Elections, "H44 Notice of Election," accessed January 21, 2014
  44. Official special election results submitted to Ballotpedia by Pearl Williams from the Connecticut Secretary of State's Office on May 15, 2014
  45. 45.0 45.1 nbcconnecticut.com, "Special Election Planned for 61st Assembly Seat," February 24, 2014
  46. Official special election results submitted to Ballotpedia by Brandon Walters from the Alabama Secretary of State's Office on May 7, 2014
  47. abc3340.com, "Johnson, Lee in runoff for Alabama House 53," December 3, 2013
  48. al.com, "In District 53 Democratic runoff, Anthony 'Alann' Johnson defeats Arthur Shores Lee in last-minute win (updated)," February 4, 2014
  49. 49.0 49.1 49.2 49.3 49.4 49.5 alreporter.com, "Governor Announces Special Election for District 53," September 19, 2013
  50. al.com, "Citing inclement weather forecast, governor delays special election set for Mobile House seat," January 27, 2014
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  52. winchester.patch.com, "Lewis, Medeiros Win Special State Senate Primaries," March 4, 2014
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