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State legislative elections, 2014

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2014 State Legislative Elections

States
AlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutDelawareFloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMarylandMassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOklahomaOregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyoming

Other 2014 Election coverage
Ballot access for major and minor party candidatesStatewide elections, 2014State Senate electionsState House electionsState executive official elections2014 ballot measures
Contents
1 What's at stake
1.1 State government trifectas
1.2 Battleground chambers
1.3 Target chambers
2 Majority control
3 Impact of term limits
4 Election dates
5 Competitiveness analysis
5.1 Incumbents in primaries
5.2 General election competition
5.3 Open seats
5.4 Incumbent turnover
6 Elections by state
7 See also
In the 50 states, there are 99 state legislative chambers altogether, and 87 of the 99 chambers held state legislative elections on November 4, 2014.

The Republican and Democratic parties each sought, in November, to move partisan control of the various state legislative chambers into their column. Heading into the election, Republicans technically controlled 57 chambers while the Democratic Party technically controlled 41 chambers, with Nebraska being nonpartisan. However, the Republican Party was part of a ruling coalition in two additional state senates (New York and the State of Washington), giving it the partisan edge in 59 chambers, with the Democratic Party having partisan control in 39.

A total of 11 chambers flipped to Republican control. Nine of them were previously held by Democrats, while Republicans gained an outright majority in two chambers where they previously ruled by coalition. The Republicans will control 68 chambers starting in January 2015. The 11 new chambers were the Colorado State Senate, Maine State Senate, the Minnesota State House, the Nevada State Senate, the Nevada State Assembly, the New Hampshire State House, the New Mexico State House, the West Virginia State Senate, the West Virginia State House, the New York State Senate and the Washington State Senate.[1] The Republican Party's performance in state legislative chambers on November 4 mirrored its successes on the federal level.

Of the 87 chambers that held elections in November, Ballotpedia identified that a "partisan flip" was a possibility in only 20 of the chambers; of these, only six chambers were considered toss-ups and five of those were held by Democrats. This meant Democrats were in a more vulnerable position when it came to holding the chambers within which they enjoyed a majority position.[2]

A total of 1,098 (55.6%) of the country's 1,972 state senate seats and 4,958 (91.6%) of the country's 5,411 state house seats were up for a vote. Altogether, 6,057 (82.0%) of the country's 7,383 state legislative seats were up for election during the midterm election year.

The 6,057 seats up for election was 40 more than the 6,015 that were up in 2012.

Of the seats up for election in November, 2,876 were held by Democrats while 3,123 were held by Republicans.[3]

During these midterm elections it was expected that voter turnout would be lower than in presidential election years, according to data since the 1840s. Additionally, the president's party consistently loses seats during midterms due to voters tending to voice dissatisfaction towards the president's performance. According to Brian Knight, a Brown University researcher, the impact of the "presidential penalty" tends to outweigh any impact from the fluctuation in voter turnout.[4]

  • SLP-flipped chambers Post-Election.png

    Legislative majorities after 2014

  • Party Dominance-State Senate-2014 PostElection.png

    State Senate party dominance

  • State House-flipped chambers Post-Election.png

    State House party dominance

  • Democratic Majority-Both Parties-PostElection.png

    Democratic majorities

  • Republican Majority-Both Parties-PostElection.png

    Republican majorities

  • State Chambers Switch-Democratic to Republican Control 2014.png

    States with chambers that flipped in 2014

What was at stake

After the 2008 election, the Republican Party launched a strategy called the REDistricting MAjority Project, or REDMAP. The strategy shifted GOP focus towards state legislative elections in an effort to control the redistricting process following the 2010 census. REDMAP was successful, netting Republicans more than 660 state legislative seats in November 2010.

Heading into the redistricting process, the GOP took over both legislative chambers in 25 states and had control of the legislature and governorship in 21 states. They used this advantage to realign districts in their favor, securing Republican-controlled seats and allowing for some states to elect Republican majorities while losing the popular vote. For example, Democrats in Michigan won more than 54 percent of the vote in state House elections yet ended up with only 51 of the 110 seats.

The GOP control on the state level has also been used to pass voter ID and registration laws that Democrats argue were intended to restrict minority voting. Republicans also made use of their majorities to pass measures limiting abortion, unions and same-sex marriage.[5][6]

In 2012, Democrats gained back some of the ground lost in 2010, gaining control of 41 chambers from 36. Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean announced in early 2013 that the political action committee he founded would be pushing to flip state legislatures through data-driven campaigns on behalf of candidates in key states.[7] The AFL-CIO set its sights on state legislative and gubernatorial elections in Florida, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.[8]

Partisan balance

Heading into the 2014 elections, Republicans held a majority of state legislative chambers. Fifty-nine chambers, counting the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate, were under Republican control. (Although the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate technically had Democratic majorities, in both states a coalition arrangement between several break-away Democrats and the minority Republicans gave the Republicans effective control of those chambers.) Democrats held effective controlling majorities in 39 chambers: 18 state senates and 21 state houses. Although technically nonpartisan, the Nebraska State Senate was controlled by a Republican majority.[9]

The following table details partisan balance in all 99 chambers.

Partisan Balance of All 99 Chambers Before and After 2014 Elections
Pre-election Post-election
Legislative Chamber Democratic Party Republican Party Split balance Independent Democratic Party Republican Party Split balance Independent
State senates 18 31* 0 1 14 35[10] 0 1
State houses 21 28 0 0 16 33 0 0
Total: 39 59* 0 1 30 68 0 1

*Note: Although Democrats had numerical majorities in both the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate, coalitions gave Republicans control of those chambers.

Fourteen independent candidates were elected to state legislatures in 2014, two in state senates and twelve in state houses. Of the 218 independent candidates that ran for election in 2014, 6.4 percent won election.[11]

State government trifectas

See also: Gubernatorial and legislative party control of state government

A trifecta is when one political party holds these three positions in a state's government:

The concept of the trifecta is important in state lawmaking because in many states, the governor, senate majority leader and house majority leader play decisive roles in the legislative process.

Heading into the 2014 elections, 36 states were controlled by a trifecta. Only Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Virginia and Washington had split party control of their governments. Nebraska is a unique case in that the Governor of Nebraska is a Republican and the legislature, although technically nonpartisan, is controlled by a Republican majority.[9]

States with a trifecta included:

  • Democratic Party 13 Democratic trifectas
  • Republican Party 23 Republican trifectas

Battleground chambers

Of the 87 chambers with elections in 2014, Ballotpedia staff identified the top 20 state legislative chambers to watch. In 15 of the chambers, the difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republicans amounted to 10 percent or less of the seats up for election in 2014. If any of the country's state legislative chambers were to switch party control as a result of the November 2014 elections, those switches were likely to occur in these 15 chambers. An additional five chambers were included for having a small difference in partisan balance even though that difference was greater than 10 percent of the seats up for election. Vacant seats were attributed to the party that previously held the district.

The following table details the 20 chambers on Ballotpedia's list. Competitive districts are defined by a margin of victory of 5 percent or less in 2012. Mildly competitive districts are defined by a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

2014 State Legislative Battleground Chambers
Chamber Seats up Partisan difference % Partisan difference 2012 Competitive districts 2012 Mildly competitive districts Pre-election control Election result
Arkansas House 100 3 3.0% 7 10 Republican Party Republican Party
Washington Senate 25 1 4.0% 1 3 Republican Party Republican Party**
New York Senate 63 3 4.8% 8 1 Republican Party Republican Party**
Colorado Senate 18 1 5.6% 3 3 Democratic Party Republican Party*
New Mexico House 70 4 5.7% 9 6 Democratic Party Republican Party*
Iowa House 100 6 6.0% 18 9 Republican Party Republican Party
Iowa Senate 25 2 8.0% 4 8 Democratic Party Democratic Party
Kentucky House 100 8 8.0% 4 10 Republican Party Republican Party
West Virginia House 100 6 6.0% 18 9 Democratic Party Republican Party*
Michigan House 110 9 8.2% 8 13 Republican Party Republican Party
New Hampshire Senate 24 2 8.3% 5 3 Republican Party Republican Party
Pennsylvania House 203 17 9.4% 7 10 Republican Party Republican Party
Minnesota House 134 12 9.0% 17 21 Democratic Party Republican Party*
Nevada Senate 11 1 9.1% 5 0 Democratic Party Republican Party*
New Hampshire House 400 40 10.0% 85 33 Democratic Party Republican Party*
Maine Senate 35 4 11.4% 7 7 Democratic Party Republican Party*
Arizona Senate 30 4 13.3% 1 3 Republican Party Republican Party
Oregon Senate 15 2 13.3% 0 2 Democratic Party Democratic Party
Pennsylvania Senate 25 4 16.0% 3 0 Republican Party Republican Party
Wisconsin Senate 17 3 17.7% 1 1 Republican Party Republican Party

Note: Chambers marked with * flipped in partisan balance. In addition to the states listed here, the Nevada State Senate and the West Virginia State Senate changed party control. Chambers marked with ** flipped to outright Republican control from a Republican coalition.[12]

Target chambers

Eleven chambers flipped to Republican control that had been held by the Democratic Party going into the election. Nine of the eleven were targeted by the Republican Legislative Campaign Committee in its "Sweet 16 Targets" list compiled in July 2014. The two chamber not included on the list were the New York State Senate and Washington State Senate. In both instances, Republican held a majority due to coalitions, but gained an outright majority in the 2014 elections.

Democratic Party

On July 1, 2014, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) released its chart of chambers it hoped to flip or make up ground in. It was divided into two categories: Emerging Majorities and Chambers to Watch. Emerging Majorities were ones the DLCC felt Democrats were most likely to reduce Republican majorities, if not flip completely. Chambers to Watch denote ones the DLCC felt enough gains could have been made to put the chamber in play for future cycles or where the party can reach constitutionally significant benchmarks.[13]

The Emerging Majority chambers were:

The Chambers to Watch were:

Republican Party

Sweet 16 Targets
In July 2014, the Republican Legislative Campaign Committee (RLCC) held its national meeting in Colorado Springs, Colorado. During the event, the RLCC announced its "Sweet 16 Targets" which were identified as opportunities to flip legislative control. Those states included:[14]

2014 Path to Victory
During the national meeting, the RLCC also released its "2014 Path to Victory." Under the Future Majority Project, an outreach initiative intended to proactively grow the Republican Party, 14 candidates were chosen in key districts.[15] Branded "14 in '14 Races to Watch," candidates in the initiative included:[14]

Majority control

See also: Partisan composition of state legislatures

A total of 87 of the 99 state legislative chambers held elections on November 4, 2014. Heading into those elections:

  • Republicans maintained majority control of both state legislative chambers in 26 states.
  • Nebraska, although nonpartisan, was considered to be a Republican majority.[16]
  • Democrats maintained majority control of both state legislative chambers in 18 states.
  • Just four states, Iowa, Kentucky, New Hampshire and West Virginia, had a split in majority control between the two chambers.

Impact of term limits

Main article: Impact of term limits on state legislative elections in 2014

Fourteen state senate chambers and thirteen state house chambers which held general elections on November 4, 2014, included some state legislators who were unable to run for re-election in 2014 because of their state's legislative term limits.

  • A total of 63 state senators were termed-out in 2014. This represented 19% of the 331 total state senate seats up for election in the 14 term-limited state senates with elections in November 2014.
  • A total of 160 state representatives were termed-out. This represented 12.7% of the 1,261 total seats up for election in the 13 term-limited states with elections in November 2014.

Altogether, 223 current state legislators were forced to leave office after the elections because of term limits. This was 14% of the 1,592 state legislative seats up for election in the 14 term-limited states with 2014 elections, and about 3.7% of the 6,047 state legislative seats that were up for election altogether in 2014, including the non-term-limited states.

State senators

Main article: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014

There were 42 state senates holding general elections in November 2014. In 14 of these states, state senators were subject to term limits. Louisiana is the only state with state senate term limits that did not have a general election in 2014.

A total of 63 current state senators were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state. This included:

  • 22 incumbent Democratic state senators
  • 24 incumbent Republican state senators
  • 17 nonpartisan state senators.

Going into the 2014 elections, the Democratic Party was the majority party in four of the 14 state senates with term limits. The Republican Party was the majority in 9 of the 14 state senates with term limits. Nebraska's state senate is term-limited and officially Nonpartisan.

  • In four states, more Democrats were term-limited out than Republicans. In California, the majority party was Democratic. In Arkansas, Florida and Montana, the majority party was Republican.
  • In seven states, more Republicans were term-limited out than Democrats. In Michigan, Missouri, Oklahoma and South Dakota, the majority party was Republican. In Colorado, Maine and Nevada, the majority party was Democratic.
  • In one state, Ohio, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats were term-limited in November 2014. Heading into the election, the majority party in Ohio was Republican.
  • There were no Arizona senators affected by term-limits in 2014.

State representatives

Main article: Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

There were 45 state houses holding general elections in November 2014. In 13 of these states, state house terms were subject to term limits. There are 15 states with state legislative term limits, but Louisiana did not hold a State House election in 2014 and Nebraska does not have a state house.

160 current state representatives were ineligible to run for re-election in November because of term limit laws in their state. This included:

  • 73 incumbent Democratic state representatives
  • 87 incumbent Republican state representatives

Going into the 2014 elections, the Democratic Party was the majority party in four of the 13 state houses with term limits. The Republican Party was the majority in eight of the 13 state houses with term limits. In one state, Nevada, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats were term-limited in November 2014. Heading into the election, the majority party in Nevada was Democratic.

  • In four states, more Democrats were term-limited out than Republicans. In California, Colorado and Maine, the majority party was Democratic. In Ohio, the majority party was Republican.
  • In eight states, more Republicans were term-limited out than Democrats. In Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Oklahoma and South Dakota the majority party was Republican.
  • In one state, Nevada, equal numbers of Republicans and Democrats were term-limited in November 2014. Heading into the election, the majority party in Nevada was Democratic.

Impact on parties

Republican representatives took a larger hit from term limits in the 2014 state legislative elections than the Democratic Party, both in terms of how many individual incumbent legislators the Republican Party lost (113, versus 95 for the Democratic Party) and in terms of how many state legislative chambers lost more Republicans (12, versus 10 for Democrats).

Incumbents

The following table details the number of state legislators unable to run for re-election due to term limits broken down by party and chamber. Republicans, who controlled about 11% more seats across the country, lost 19% more incumbents to term limits than Democrats.

Party # of termed senators # of termed representatives Total
Democratic 22 73 95
Republican 24 87 113
Nonpartisan 17 0 17

Chambers

The following table details the number of chambers where one party lost more incumbents due to term limits.

Party Senates with most losses Houses with most losses Total
Democratic 4 6 10
Republican 5 7 12
Equal D/R losses (or nonpartisan chamber) 4 0 4

Election dates

See also: Signature requirements and deadlines for 2014 state legislative elections

Illinois and Texas opened the 2014 campaign season with filing deadlines in December 2013. The latest filing deadline in 2014 was in New York on July 10.

The 2014 state legislative primaries started in Texas on March 4 and ended on September 9 with a cluster of primaries in Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York and Rhode Island.

The state legislative filing deadlines and primary dates listed by month were as follows:

Filing deadlines

The number of days between the candidate filing deadline and primary election vary widely from state to state

December

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

Primaries

March

May

June

August

September

Length of primary campaigns

While each state holds a primary, the amount of time between signature filing deadlines can differ greatly. In 2014, candidates running for state legislative office in North Dakota had just 64 days between their filing deadline and primary. Meanwhile, candidates in Missouri had a massive 133 days, more than double that of North Dakota, to campaign for the primary election. On average, candidates were given about 84 days between the filing deadline and primary election to get their message to voters.

Competitiveness analysis

See also: 2014 state legislative elections analyzed using a Competitiveness Index
2014 Competitiveness Overview
Competitiveness2014.jpg
Primary competition (state comparison)
Incumbents defeatedVictorious challengers
Primary competitiveness
Major party challengers (state comparison)
Candidates with no challenges at all in 2014
Open seats (state comparisons)
Impact of term limits on # of open seats
Long-serving senatorsLong-serving reps
Star bookmark.png   Chart Comparing 2014 Results   Star bookmark.png
Chart Comparing 2014 ResultsComparisons Between Years
Competitiveness IndexAbsolute Index
2014 State Legislative Elections
State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014
Competitiveness Studies from Other Years
200720092010201120122013

All three aspects of Ballotpedia's Competitiveness Index -- the number of open seats, incumbents facing primary opposition and general elections between partisan candidates -- showed poor results compared to the prior election cycle. States with elections in 2014 held fewer general elections between partisan candidates, fewer incumbents faced primary opposition and more incumbents ran for re-election than in recent years.

Since 2010, when the Competitiveness Index was established, there had not been an even-year election cycle to do statistically worse in any of the three categories. See the following chart for a breakdown of those scores between each year.

Overall Comparison between years
2010 2012 2014
Competitiveness Index 36.2 35.8 31.4
 % Open Seats 18.6% 21.2% 17.0%
 % Inc that did face primary 22.7% 24.6% 20.1%
 % Candidates that did face major party opp 67.3% 61.7% 57.0%

The objective of the analysis is to know which states have the most competitive electoral environment and which states have the least competitive electoral environments in 2014. The term "competitive" is not used to declare which states are hotly contested between political parties. Instead, the term is used to indicate competitive environment on a ballot access level. The Competitiveness Index focuses on the relative competitiveness of state legislative elections by noting where incumbents are being challenged and if opportunities for election bids are being considered by candidates.

Incumbents in primaries

See also: Incumbents with a primary challenger in the 2014 state legislative elections
CA2014image1.png

A total of 1,009 incumbents faced a primary challenger in 2014.

Since 5,026 incumbents ran for re-election in 2014, that means that only 20.1% of them faced a primary challenger. In 2012, 1,175 (24.6%) of incumbents faced a primary opponent.

The remaining 4,017 incumbents (79.9%) that ran for re-election in 2014 had no primary challenger.

General election competition

See also: Major party candidates with major party competition in the November 2014 state legislative elections

There are 1,972 state senators and 5,411 state representatives. Heading into the election, there were only 72 total third party legislators out of 7,383 total state legislators. Of those 72, 49 were Nebraska State Senators, where all candidates must run as a nonpartisan. Thus, a major party candidate is virtually guaranteed election when facing third parties.

CA2014image02.png
  • Given that major party candidates win nearly 100% of the time, a candidate running without any major party opposition is essentially assured election -- even if there are third party candidates.
  • There was only one major party candidate in 2,606 (43.02%) of the 6,057 seats up for election in 2014.
  • There was more than one major party candidate in 3,451 (56.98%) of the 6,057 seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, 3,709 (61.7%) seats had two or more major party candidates.

Open seats

See also: Open seats in the 2014 state legislative elections
CA2014image03.png

There was no incumbent running for re-election in 1,030 (17.0%) of the 6,057 seats up for election in 2014, either because he or she voluntarily chose not to run again, faced term limits or was affected by redistricting. This is a decrease from 21.2 percent in 2012.

In 5,027 (83.0%) of the 6,057 seats up for election in 2014, the incumbent ran for re-election.

Incumbent turnover

See also: State legislative incumbent turnover in 2014

In addition to themes previously presented in the Competitiveness Index, Ballotpedia staff analyzed primary results to look for the following circumstances:

  • Incumbents who were defeated by primary challengers
  • Overall turnover, including defeated incumbents and retirements, and the total number of open seats heading into the general election.

What we found is that while Republicans have a higher degree of turnover, the margin between that turnover and the partisan balance of seats with elections is not great. Furthermore, while Republicans were challenged in the primary at a higher rate, incumbents from both sides advanced past primary elections at similar rates.

2014 state legislative elections analyzed using a Competitiveness Index
  • Of the 1,009 partisan incumbents who faced primary opposition, 130 were defeated.
Democratic Party 47 Democrats were defeated, with 88.78 percent advancing past the primary.
Republican Party 83 Republicans were defeated while the remaining 85.93 percent have advanced.
  • Overall, 87.12 percent of incumbents advanced past the primary.
  • 1,012 partisan incumbents declined to seek re-election.
  • 1,159 incumbents, including nonpartisan incumbents, retired or were defeated, meaning that 19.14 percent of seats were open heading into the general election.
  • Republicans accounted for 54.99 percent of overall partisan incumbent turnover, while Democrats made up for 45.01 percent. Of the seats up for election in 2014, 51.6 percent were held by Republicans and 47.5 percent were held by Democrats.

Elections by state

Alabama

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (11) Republican Party (23) Independent (1)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (37) Republican Party (66) Independent (1)

The Republicans held a 12 seat lead in the Senate, which was 34.2 percent of the 35 seats up for election in 2014. The 29-seat Republican lead in the House was 27.6 percent of the 105 seats up for election in 2014. Alabama's state senators and representatives are elected to a four-year term that begins at midnight following the day of the election.

Alaska

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (7) Republican Party (13)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (14) Republican Party (26)

The Republicans held a six seat lead in the Senate, which was 60 percent of the ten seats up for election in 2014. The 12-seat Republican lead in the House was 30 percent of the 40 seats up for election in 2014. Alaska's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins the fourth Monday of January following a November election.

Arizona

BattlegroundRace.jpg
Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (13) Republican Party (17)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (24) Republican Party (36)

The Republicans held a three seat lead in the Senate, which was 10 percent of the thirty seats up for election in 2014. The 12-seat Republican lead in the House was 20 percent of the 60 seats up for election in 2014. Arizona's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins the first day of the session after they are elected. Each regular session begins on the first Monday in January. Members are limited to four terms, for a total of eight years.

Battleground chamber: The Arizona Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of four seats, which amounted to 13.3 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of four districts were competitive or mildly competitive. In 2012, District 8 had a margin of victory of three percent. Three other districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Arkansas

BattlegroundRace.jpg
Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (13) Republican Party (22)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (48) Republican Party (51) Green Party (1)

The Republicans held a nine seat lead in the Senate, which was 50 percent of the 18 seats up for election in 2014. The 3-seat Republican lead in the House was 3 percent of the 100 seats up for election in 2014. Arkansas's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins the first day of the session after they are elected. Each regular session begins on the second Monday in January. Members are limited to two terms, for a total of eight years.

Battleground chamber: The Arkansas House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of three seats, which amounted to 3 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 17 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were seven districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another 10 districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

California

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (28) Republican Party (12)
Assembly Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (55) Republican Party (25)

The Democrats held a 16 seat lead in the Senate, which was 80 percent of the 20 seats up for election in 2014. The 31-seat Democratic lead in the Assembly is 38.8 percent of the 80 seats up for election in 2014. California's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday in December following their election. Senators are limited to serving no more than two four-year terms. California's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday in December following their election. Representatives are limited to serving no more than four two-year terms.

Colorado

BattlegroundRace.jpg
Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (18) Republican Party (17)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (37) Republican Party (28)

The Democrats held a one seat lead in the Senate, which was 5.6 percent of the 18 seats up for election in 2014. The 9-seat Democratic lead in the House was 13.8 percent of the 65 seats up for election in 2014. Colorado's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on first day of the legislative session after their election, which begins no later than 10:00 AM on the second Wednesday of January. Senators are limited to no more than two consecutive terms. Colorado's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on first day of the legislative session after their election, which begins no later than 10:00 AM on the second Wednesday of January. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Battleground chamber: The Colorado Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of one seat, which amounted to 5.6 percent of the seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, when 16 districts were up for election, a total of six districts were competitive or mildly competitive. Two of those districts, District 19 and District 22, are up for election again in 2014. Both of those districts had a margin of victory of 5 percent or less in 2012.

Connecticut

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (22) Republican Party (14)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (97) Republican Party (54)

The Democrats held a eight seat lead in the Senate, which was 22.2 percent of the 36 seats up for election in 2014. The 43-seat Democratic lead in the House was 28.5 percent of the 151 seats up for election in 2014. Connecticut's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the Wednesday following the first Monday of January after their election. Connecticut's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the Wednesday following the first Monday of January after their election.

Delaware

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (13) Republican Party (8)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (27) Republican Party (14)

The Democrats held a five seat lead in the Senate, which was 50 percent of the 10 seats up for election in 2014. The 13-seat Democratic lead in the House was 31.7 percent of the 41 seats up for election in 2014. Delaware's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins the second Tuesday in January following their election.. Delaware's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins the second Tuesday in January following their election.

Florida

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (14) Republican Party (26)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (45) Republican Party (75)

Republicans held a 12 seat lead in the Senate, which was 60 percent of the 20 seats up for election in 2014. The 30-seat Republican lead in the House was 25 percent of the 120 seats up for election in 2014. Florida's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins two weeks following their election. Senators are limited to no more than two consecutive four-year terms. Florida's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins two weeks following their election. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Georgia

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (18) Republican Party (38)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (60) Republican Party (119) Independent (1)

The Republicans held a 20 seat lead in the Senate, which was 35.7 percent of the 56 seats up for election in 2014. The 59-seat Republican lead in the House was 33 percent of the 180 seats up for election in 2014. Georgia's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Monday in January. Georgia's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday in January.

Hawaii

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (24) Republican Party (1)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (44) Republican Party (7)

The Democrats held a 23 seat lead in the Senate, which was 176 percent of the 13 seats up for election in 2014. The 37-seat Democratic lead in the House was 72.5 percent of the 51 seats up for election in 2014. Hawaii's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of Legislative session after the election (usually the third Wednesday of January). Hawaii's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of Legislative session after the election (usually the third Wednesday of January).

Idaho

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (7) Republican Party (28)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (13) Republican Party (57)

The Republicans held a 21 seat lead in the Senate, which was 60 percent of the 35 seats up for election in 2014. The 44-seat Republican lead in the House was 62 percent of the 70 seats up for election in 2014. Idaho's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of December following the general election. Idaho's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of December following the general election.

Illinois

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (40) Republican Party (18)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (71) Republican Party (47)

The Democrats held a 21 seat lead in the Senate, which was 111 percent of the 19 seats up for election in 2014. The 24-seat Democratic lead in the House was 20.34 percent of the 118 seats up for election in 2014. Illinois' state senators are elected to a two or four-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January. Under the Illinois Constitution of 1970, senators are divided into three groups, each group having a two-year term at a different part of the decade between censuses, with the rest of the decade being taken up by two four-year terms Illinois' state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January.

Indiana

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (13) Republican Party (37)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (31) Republican Party (69)

The Republicans held a 24 seat lead in the Senate, which was 96 percent of the 25 seats up for election in 2014. The 38-seat Republican lead in the House was 38 percent of the 100 seats up for election in 2014. Indiana's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the day after their general election. Indiana's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the day after their general election.

Iowa

BattlegroundRace.jpg
Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (26) Republican Party (24)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (47) Republican Party (53)

The Democrats held a two seat lead in the Senate, which was 8 percent of the 25 seats up for election in 2014. The six-seat Republican lead in the House was 6 percent of the 100 seats up for election in 2014. Iowa's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Monday of January after their election. Iowa's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday of January after their election.

Battleground chambers: The Iowa Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of two seats, which amounted to 8 percent of the chamber. In 2012, when 26 seats were up for election, a total of 12 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. One of those districts, District 49, is up for election again in 2014. That district had a margin of victory of 9 percent in 2012.

The Iowa House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of six seats, which amounted to 6 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 27 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were 18 districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another nine districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Kansas

Kansas did not hold any state senate elections in 2014.

House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (32) Republican Party (93)

The Republicans held a 61 seat lead in the House, which was 48.80 percent of the 125 seats up for election in 2014. Kansas's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday of January after their election.

Kentucky

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (14) Republican Party (23) Independent (1)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (54) Republican Party (46)

The Republicans held a nine seat lead in the Senate, which was 47.4 percent of the 19 seats up for election in 2014. The eight-seat Democratic lead in the House was 8 percent of the 100 seats up for election in 2014. Kentucky's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January after their election. Kentucky's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January after their election.

Battleground chamber: The Kentucky House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of eight seats, which amounted to 8 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 12 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were four districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another 10 districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Louisiana

Louisiana did not hold any state legislative elections in 2014.

Maine

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (19) Republican Party (15) Independent (1)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (89) Republican Party (58) Independent (4)

The Democrats held a four seat lead in the Senate, which was 11.4 percent of the 35 seats up for election in 2014. The 31-seat Democratic lead in the House was 20.5 percent of the 151 seats up for election in 2014. Maine's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in December after their election. Senators are limited to no more than four consecutive terms. Maine's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in December after their election. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Battleground chamber: The Maine Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of four seats, which amounted to 11.4 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 14 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were seven districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another seven districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Note: Governor Paul LePage signed Maine's redistricting plans on June 14, 2013, making the 2014 elections the first cycle to be affected by the 2010 redistricting process in Maine.

Maryland

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (35) Republican Party (12)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (98) Republican Party (43)

The Democrats held a 23 seat lead in the Senate, which was 48.9 percent of the 47 seats up for election in 2014. The 55-seat Democratic lead in the House was 39 percent of the 141 seats up for election in 2014. Maryland's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January after the election. Maryland's state representatives are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Wednesday in January after the election.

Massachusetts

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (36) Republican Party (4)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (131) Republican Party (29)

The Democrats held a 32 seat lead in the Senate, which was 80 percent of the 40 seats up for election in 2014. The 102-seat Democratic lead in the House was 63.75 percent of the 160 seats up for election in 2014. Massachusetts' state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in January after the election. Massachusetts' state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday in January after the election.

Michigan

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (12) Republican Party (26)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (50) Republican Party (59) Independent (1)

The Republicans held a 14 seat lead in the Senate, which was 36.8 percent of the 38 seats up for election in 2014. The nine-seat Republican lead in the House was 8.2 percent of the 110 seats up for election in 2014. Michigan's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January. Michigan's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January.

Battleground chamber: The Michigan House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of nine seats, which amounted to 8.2 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 21 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were eight districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another 13 districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Minnesota

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Minnesota did not hold any state senate elections in 2014.

House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (73) Republican Party (61)

The Democrats held a 12 seat lead in the House, which was 9 percent of the 134 seats up for election in 2014. Minnesota's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session.

Battleground chamber: The Minnesota House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of 12 seats, which amounted to 9 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 38 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were 17 districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another 21 districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Mississippi

Mississippi did not hold any state legislative elections in 2014.

Missouri

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (9) Republican Party (23)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (52) Republican Party (109)

The Republicans held a 14 seat lead in the Senate, which was 82.35 percent of the 17 seats up for election in 2014. The 57-seat Republican lead in the House was 34.97 percent of the 163 seats up for election in 2014. Missouri's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session. Senators are limited to no more than two four-year terms. Missouri's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the legislative session. Representatives are limited to no more than four two-year terms.

Montana

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (21) Republican Party (29)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (39) Republican Party (61)

The Republicans held a eight seat lead in the Senate, which was 32 percent of the 25 seats up for election in 2014. The 22-seat Republican lead in the House was 22 percent of the 100 seats up for election in 2014. Montana's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday of January following the election. Montana term limits state that officials may not seek re-election if they have held office for eight years in a 16-year period. Montana's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday of January following the election. Montana term limits state that officials may not seek re-election if they have held office for eight years in a 16-year period.

Nebraska

Nebraska's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Wednesday after the first Monday in January. Senators are limited to no more than two four-year terms.

Nevada

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (11) Republican Party (10)
Assembly Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (27) Republican Party (15)

The Democrats held a one seat lead in the Senate, which was 9.1 percent of the 11 seats up for election in 2014. The 12-seat Democratic lead in the House was 28.57 percent of the 42 seats up for election in 2014. Nevada's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the day after the election. Nevada's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the day after the election.

Battleground chamber: The Nevada Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of one seat, which amounted to 9 percent of the seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, a total of five districts were competitive, with a margin of victory was 5 percent or less.

New Hampshire

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (11) Republican Party (13)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (220) Republican Party (180)

The Republicans held a two seat lead in the Senate, which was 8.3 percent of the 24 seats up for election in 2014. The 40-seat Democratic lead in the House was 10 percent of the 400 seats up for election in 2014. New Hampshire's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the month after elections (December). New Hampshire's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the month after elections (December).

Battleground chambers: With vacant seats counting towards the party that previously held the seat, the New Hampshire Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of two seats, which amounted to 8.3 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of eight districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were five districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another three districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

With vacant seats counting towards the party that previously held the seat, the New Hampshire House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of 40 seats, which amounted to 10 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 118 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were 85 districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another 33 districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

New Jersey

New Jersey did not hold any state legislative elections in 2014.

New Mexico

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New Mexico did not hold any state senate elections in 2014.

House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (37) Republican Party (33)

The Democrats held a four seat lead in the House, which was 5.7 percent of the 70 seats up for election in 2014. New Mexico's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st.

Battleground chamber: The New Mexico House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of four seats, which amounted to 5.7 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 15 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were nine districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another six districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

New York

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (33) Republican Party (30)
Assembly Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (107) Republican Party (43)

The Democrats held a three seat lead in the Senate, which was 4.8 percent of the 63 seats up for election in 2014. The 64-seat Democratic lead in the House was 42.67 percent of the 150 seats up for election in 2014. New York's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st. New York's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st.

Battleground chamber: The New York Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of three seats, which amounted to 4.8 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of nine districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were eight districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Additionally, District 37 had a margin of victory of 8 percent.

North Carolina

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (17) Republican Party (33)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (43) Republican Party (77)

The Republicans held a 16 seat lead in the Senate, which was 32 percent of the 50 seats up for election in 2014. The 34-seat Republican lead in the House was 28.3 percent of the 120 seats up for election in 2014. North Carolina's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the new General Assembly in January. North Carolina's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of the new General Assembly in January.

North Dakota

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (14) Republican Party (33)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (23) Republican Party (71)

The Republicans held a 19 seat lead in the Senate, which was 79.2 percent of the 24 seats up for election in 2014. The 48-seat Republican lead in the House was 100 percent of the 48 seats up for election in 2014. North Dakota's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on December 1st. North Dakota's state representatives are elected to a four-year term that begins on December 1st.

Ohio

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (10) Republican Party (23)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (38) Republican Party (61)

The Republicans held a 13 seat lead in the Senate, which was 76.5 percent of the 17 seats up for election in 2014. The 23-seat Republican lead in the House was 23.2 percent of the 99 seats up for election in 2014. Ohio's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on January 1st. Senators are limited to no more than two consecutive terms. Ohio's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on January 1st. Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Oklahoma

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (12) Republican Party (36)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (29) Republican Party (72)

The Republicans held a 24 seat lead in the Senate, which was 100 percent of the 24 seats up for election in 2014. The 43-seat Republican lead in the House was 42.6 percent of the 101 seats up for election in 2014. Oklahoma's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on November 17th. Senators are limited to no more than a combined total of twelve years in the senate and house of representatives. Oklahoma's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on November 17th. Representatives are limited to no more than a combined total of twelve years in the senate and house of representatives.

Oregon

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (16) Republican Party (14)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (34) Republican Party (26)

The Democrats held a two seat lead in the Senate, which was 13.3 percent of the 15 seats up for election in 2014. The eight-seat Democratic lead in the House was 13.3 percent of the 60 seats up for election in 2014. Oregon's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the second Monday in January. Oregon's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the second Monday in January.

Battleground chamber: The Oregon Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of two seats, which amounted to 13.3 percent of the seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, when 14 districts were up for election, a total of two districts were mildly competitive, with a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Pennsylvania

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (23) Republican Party (27)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (92) Republican Party (111)

The Republicans held a four seat lead in the Senate, which was 16 percent of the 25 seats up for election in 2014. The 17-seat Republican lead in the House was 8.37 percent of the 203 seats up for election in 2014. Pennsylvania's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins in January. Pennsylvania's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins in January.

Battleground chambers: The Pennsylvania Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of four seats, which amounted to 16 percent of the seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, when the 25 odd-numbered districts were up for election, a total of three districts were competitive, with a margin of victory of 5 percent or less.

The Pennsylvania House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of 19 seats, which amounted to 9.3 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 17 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were seven districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another 10 districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Rhode Island

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (32) Republican Party (5) Independent (1)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (69) Republican Party (6)

The Democrats held a 27 seat lead in the Senate, which was 71.1 percent of the 38 seats up for election in 2014. The 63-seat Democratic lead in the House was 84 percent of the 75 seats up for election in 2014. Rhode Island's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Tuesday in January. Rhode Island's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Tuesday in January.

South Carolina

South Carolina did not hold any state senate elections in 2014.

House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (46) Republican Party (78)

The Republicans held a 32 seat lead in the House, which was 25.8 percent of the 124 seats up for election in 2014.South Carolina's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the Monday after the election.

South Dakota

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (7) Republican Party (28)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (17) Republican Party (53)

The Republicans held a 21 seat lead in the Senate, which was 60 percent of the 35 seats up for election in 2014. The 36-seat Republican lead in the House was 51.4 percent of the 70 seats up for election in 2014. South Dakota's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of session after election (Jan. 11). Senators are limited to no more than four consecutive terms. South Dakota's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of session after election (Jan. 11). Representatives are limited to no more than four consecutive terms.

Tennessee

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (7) Republican Party (26)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (27) Republican Party (71)

The Republicans held a 19 seat lead in the Senate, which was 112 percent of the 17 seats up for election in 2014. The 44-seat Republican lead in the House was 44.4 percent of the 99 seats up for election in 2014. Tennessee's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the 15th of January after the election. Tennessee's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the 15th of January after the election.

Texas

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (12) Republican Party (19)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (55) Republican Party (95)

The Republicans held a seven seat lead in the Senate, which was 46.67 percent of the 15 seats up for election in 2014. The 40-seat Republican lead in the House was 26.67 percent of the 150 seats up for election in 2014. Texas's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the beginning of the legislative session (January). Texas's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the beginning of the legislative session (January).

Utah

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (5) Republican Party (24)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (14) Republican Party (61)

The Republicans held a 19 seat lead in the Senate, which was 135% percent of the 14 seats up for election in 2014. The 47-seat Republican lead in the House was 62.7 percent of the 75 seats up for election in 2014. Utah's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of January following a November election. Utah's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of January following a November election.

Vermont

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (21) Republican Party (7) Lime2.png (2)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (96) Republican Party (45) Lime2.png (5) Independent (4)

The Democrats held a 14 seat lead in the Senate, which was 46.7 percent of the 30 seats up for election in 2014. The 51-seat Democratic lead in the House was 34 percent of the 150 seats up for election in 2014. Vermont's state senators are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday after the first Tuesday in January. Vermont's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Wednesday after the first Tuesday in January.

Virginia

Virginia did not hold any state legislative elections in 2014.

Washington

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (25) Republican Party (24)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (55) Republican Party (43)

The Democrats held a one seat lead in the Senate, which was 4 percent of the 25 seats up for election in 2014. The 12-seat Democratic lead in the House was 12.24 percent of the 98 seats up for election in 2014. Washington's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of session. Washington's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of session.

Battleground chamber: The Washington Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of one seat, which amounted to 4 percent of seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, when 24 districts were up for election, a total of four districts were competitive or mildly competitive. One of those districts, District 41, is up for election again in 2014. That district had a margin of victory of 8 percent in 2012.

West Virginia

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (24) Republican Party (10)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (53) Republican Party (47)

The Democrats held a 14 seat lead in the Senate, which was 82.4 percent of the 17 seats up for election in 2014. The six-seat Democratic lead in the House was 6 percent of the 100 seats up for election in 2014. West Virginia's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first day of December following the election. West Virginia's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first day of December following the election.

Battleground chamber: The West Virginia House held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of six seats, which amounted to 6 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 27 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were 18 districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another nine districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.

Wisconsin

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Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (15) Republican Party (18)
Assembly Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (38) Republican Party (60) Independent (1)

The Republicans held a three seat lead in the Senate, which was 17.6 percent of the 17 seats up for election in 2014. The 21-seat Republican lead in the Assembly is 21% percent of the 99 seats up for election in 2014. Wisconsin's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election. Wisconsin's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election.

Battleground chamber: The Wisconsin Senate held a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of three seats, which amounted to 17.7 percent of the seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, when the 16 even-numbered districts were up for election, a total of two districts were competitive or mildly competitive. District 18 had a margin of victory of 0.7 percent in the 2012 elections. District 30 had a margin of victory of 9 percent.

Wyoming

Senate Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (4) Republican Party (26)
House Partisan Breakdown: Democratic Party (8) Republican Party (52)

The Republicans held a 22 seat lead in the Senate, which was 147 percent of the 15 seats up for election in 2014. The 44-seat Republican lead in the House was 73.3 percent of the 60 seats up for election in 2014. Wyoming's state senators are elected to a four-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election. Wyoming's state representatives are elected to a two-year term that begins on the first Monday in January following the election.

See also

References

  1. Note: The West Virginia State Senate was originally tied but State Senator Daniel Hall changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party the day after the election, giving partisan control to the Republicans.
  2. Governing, "Democrats Playing Defense in 2014 State Legislative Races", June 23, 2014
  3. Ballotpedia's analysis of the 2014 state legislative elections
  4. Pew Research Center, "Voter turnout always drops off for midterm elections, but why?," July 24, 2014
  5. reuters.com, "Democrats: It’s the states, stupid!," July 14, 2013
  6. politico.com, "Obama’s states of despair: 2010 losses still haunt," July 26, 2013
  7. huffingtonpost.com, "Howard Dean Launches Campaign To Flip State Legislatures," March 26, 2013
  8. nytimes.com, "Labor Leaders See Focus on Wages as Key to Union and Democratic Victories," February 19, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 Omaha.com, "Democrats cut into GOP lead in Nebraska Legislature," accessed May 13, 2014 (dead link)
  10. Note: West Virginia was originally tied but State Senator Daniel Hall changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party the day after the election, giving partisan control to the Republicans.
  11. ballot-access.org, "Fourteen Independent Candidates Elected to State Legislatures," November 6, 2014
  12. Note: West Virginia was originally tied but State Senator Daniel Hall changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party the day after the election, giving partisan control to the Republicans.
  13. Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee, "DLCC Releases Flip Chart 2014, Offers Democratic Outlook for 2014 State Legislative Races," July 1, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 Republican State Leadership Committee, "The RLCC's 2014 Path to Victory, July 17, 2014
  15. sarahmaestasbarnes.com, "RSLC’s Future Majority Project Announces Recruitment of 244 Candidates and “14 in ‘14 Races to Watch”," July 11, 2014
  16. Omaha.com, "Democrats cut into GOP lead in Nebraska Legislature," accessed May 13, 2014 (dead link)