State legislative scorecards in South Carolina

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State legislative scorecards

Legislative scorecards by state
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On Ballotpedia, we define scorecards as those produced by newspapers, interest groups, state think tanks, partisan groups, 501c3s and 501c4s that provide relative rankings and cover all state or federal lawmakers. Some scorecards are created with a focus on specific issues, while others are broad in scope.

Because scorecards can be specific to particular issues or general to a state’s legislative term, for example, each report should be considered on its own merits. Each entity that publishes these reports uses different methodologies and definitions for the terms used.

To contribute to this list, email suggestions to scorecards@ballotpedia.org. In some cases, we’ve been able to provide in-depth descriptions about the reports and the grading processes. However, for those that do not yet feature such descriptions, we do encourage readers and wiki volunteers to help expand these areas. See our writing guidelines to contribute.

See also: State legislative scorecards

2013-2014

The South Carolina State Legislature was in its 120th legislative session from January 8, 2013, to June 6, 2014. In 2014, a statewide session was held from June 17 to June 19 "for the consideration of certain specified matters."[1]

  • Legislators are scored on business issues, including: infrastructure funding, the Department of Employment and Workforce Integrity bill, expanding 4-year-old kindergarten and funding for the Manufacturing Skills Standard Council.
  • Environment North Carolina, a statewide, citizen-based environmental advocacy organization, monitors the voting records of North Carolina’s state legislators on key environmental issues.
  • The scorecards are not comprehensive, but concentrate on issues related to jobs, spending, and freedom.
  • Legislators are scored on efforts to promote economic freedom, lower taxes, create an efficient and accountable state government, reduce spending, protect small businesses and reform the state's pension system.

2011-2012

The South Carolina State Legislature was in its 119th legislative session from January 11, 2011, to June 7, 2012. On June 2, 2011, Governor Nikki Haley attempted to call the Legislature into an "emergency" special session to begin on June 7 to create the new South Carolina Department of Administration. A lawsuit was filed by Senate President Pro Tem Glenn McConnell, in which he contended that Haley's call for a special session was unconstitutional, and that it violated the state Constitution's requirement of separation of powers among the governor, legislature and courts.[2] On June 6, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled 3-2 against Governor Haley, stating that her order violated the Legislature's ability to set its calendar and agenda.[3] The legislature met in a special redistricting session from June 14 - July 1.[4] The legislature re-convened July 26.[5]

  • Legislators are scored on environment and conservation of land efforts.
  • Legislators are scored on medicaid flexibility, economic development, vetoes sustained, and record of votes.
  • Legislators are scored on limited government, the free market, and individual liberty and responsibility.
  • The RLC supports individual rights, limited government and free enterprise.
  • BIPEC uses roll call votes on business and industry issues to calculate a Vote Score for members of South Carolina's state legislature.
  • Legislators are scored on efforts to promote economic freedom, lower taxes, create an efficient and accountable state government, reduce spending, protect small businesses and reform the state's pension system.

See also

References