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Stockton, California municipal elections, 2014

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2015


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The city of Stockton, California held nonpartisan elections for city council on November 4, 2014. A primary election took place on June 3, 2014.[1]

Three of Stockton's seven council seats were up for election. Incumbents ran for re-election in Districts 1 and 5. District 3, however, was an open seat.

While issues such as crime and economic development played a role in Stockton's 2014 election cycle, bankruptcy proved to be a defining issue in the city's 2014 municipal elections.

City council

Candidate list

District 1

June 3 Primary election candidates:

District 3

Note: Incumbent Paul Canepa did not run for re-election.

June 3 Primary election candidates:

November 4 General election candidates:

District 5

June 3 Primary election candidates:

November 4 General election candidates:

Election results

[edit]
Stockton City Council District 3 General Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSusan Lofthus 64.8% 23,783
Gene Acevedo 35.2% 12,919
Total Votes 36,702
Source: San Joaquin County Registrar of Voters - Official General Election Results
Stockton City Council District 5 General Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngChristina Fugazi 54.2% 20,159
Dyane Burgos Medina Incumbent 45.8% 17,066
Total Votes 37,225
Source: San Joaquin County Registrar of Voters - Official General Election Results
Stockton City Council District 1 Primary Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngElbert Holman, Jr. Incumbent 57.3% 3,159
A.S. "Rick" Grewal 42.3% 2,329
Write-in Votes 0.4% 22
Total Votes 5,510
Source: San Joaquin County Registrar of Voters - Official primary election results
Stockton City Council District 3 Primary Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngSusan Lofthus 56.9% 3,301
Green check mark transparent.pngGene Acevedo 27.2% 1,574
Motecuzoma Sanchez 15.5% 901
Write-in Votes 0.4% 21
Total Votes 5,797
Source: San Joaquin County Registrar of Voters - Official primary election results
Stockton City Council District 5 Primary Election, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDyane Burgos Medina Incumbent 42.1% 1,262
Green check mark transparent.pngChristina Fugazi 35.8% 1,075
Mark Stebbins 21.7% 652
Write-in Votes 0.3% 10
Total Votes 2,999
Source: San Joaquin County Registrar of Voters - Official primary election results

Issues

Bankruptcy

Stockton filed for bankruptcy in 2011. The city's exit plan was still moving through the courts only days before the November 4 elections.[2] The issue was a frequent topic of discussion in candidate forums and debates.[3]

As November approached, the issue of bankruptcy in Stockton became more pressing due to an early October ruling by a federal judge in California on how pensions configure into municipal exit plans in bankruptcy cases. One of Stockton's major creditors, Franklin Templeton Investments, argued for a reduction in the amount that the city owed its pension obligations. The reduction could, it was argued, create more revenue from which Franklin Templeton could collect on the $36 million that the city owed the company. Stockton's exit plan proposed repaying Franklin Templeton only one percent of the amount owed. It did not propose a reduction in city-funded pension obligations. Lawyers for the California Public Employees' Retirement System argued that any adjustments to Stockton's pension obligations were illegal. On October 1, however, a federal judge - the same judge presiding over Stockton's bankruptcy proceedings - ruled that a city could, in fact, legally reduce pensions in the event of municipal bankruptcy. The ruling paved the way for the possibility that a pension reduction could become part of Stockton's exit plan, pending how the judge rules in late October.[4] Nonetheless, on October 30, the courts approved Stockton's exit plan in its original form, thus leaving the city's pension obligations untouched.[5]

Recent news

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See also

External links

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References