Template:Ilcandidateprocess

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Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states, including Illinois, elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Chapter 10, Section 5, Article 7 of the Illinois Statutes

In Illinois, candidates may run as established party candidates, new party candidates, independent candidates or write-in candidates.[1] Established party, new party and independent candidates have the same filing requirements, but the process for write-in candidates is different. These processes are outlined below.

Party candidates and independents

Established party candidates, new party candidates and independent candidates must file nomination papers with the Illinois State Board of Elections to become candidates in Illinois. These nomination papers must be filed during the candidate's designated filing period. The filing period for established party candidates begins 106 days before the primary election and ends 113 days before the primary election.[2] New party and independent candidates have a separate filing period. Their filing period begins 134 days before the general election and ends 141 days before the general election.[1]

Nomination papers include:[1]

  • Statement of candidacy[3]
    • This form must contain the address, office sought and political party designation (if applicable) of the candidate.
    • This form includes a statement affirming that the candidate is qualified for the office sought, which must be signed by the candidate and notarized.
  • Receipt of Statement of Economic Interests[1]
    • The original Statement of Economic Interests must be filed with the Illinois Secretary of State, which will then issue the Receipt of the Statement of Economic Interests for the candidate to file with the Illinois State Board of Elections.
    • This form is not required from candidates seeking federal office.
    • It is suggested this form be filed at the same time as filing all other nomination papers, but it may be filed after the other papers as long as it is filed within the candidate filing period.
  • Loyalty Oath[1][4]
    • This form is optional.
    • If candidates choose to sign it, they must affirm that they are not affiliated directly or indirectly with any organization that seeks to overthrow the government of the United States or the state of Illinois.
  • Petition[1]
    • Candidates can begin circulating their petitions 90 days before the last day of their filing period.[5]
    • Signature requirements for petitions vary by the candidate's political party affiliation and the office sought.
    • Examples of signature requirements for new party candidate petitions can be found above in "Process to establish a political party."
    • Examples of signature requirements for established party candidates and independent candidates can be found in the tables below.
Signature requirements for established party candidates
Office sought Number of signatures required in statutes Number of signatures required for the 2014 elections[1]
State executive office or U.S. Senate office No less than 5,000 but no more than 10,000 5,000-10,000
Congressional District 1 Number equal to one-half of one percent of the total number of qualified party electors in the same party as the candidate who voted in the last presidential election 1,314 for Democratic candidates or 337 for Republican candidates
State Senate District 1 No less than 1,000 but no more than 3,000 1,000-3,000
State House District 1 No less than 500 but no more than 1,500 500-1,500
Signature requirements for independent candidates
Office sought Number of signatures required in statutes Number of signatures required for the 2014 elections[1]
State executive office or U.S. Senate office Number equal to one percent of voters who cast a vote in the last general election or 25,000, whichever is less 25,000
Congressional District 1 Number equal to no less than five percent but no more than eight percent of the total number of voters who cast ballots at the most recent general election in the same district 16,815-26,903
State Senate District 1 Number equal to no less than five percent but no more than eight percent of the total number of voters who cast ballots at the most recent general election in the same district 2,401-3,841
State House District 1 Number equal to no less than five percent but no more than eight percent of the total number of voters who cast ballots at the most recent general election in the same district 1,157-1,850

Any objections to nomination papers must be filed no later than five business days after the filing deadline.[6]

Write-in candidates

Write-in votes will not be counted unless the candidate files a Declaration of Intent to be a Write-In Candidate no later than 61 days before the election in which he or she is running. This form must include the office sought by the candidate.[1][7]

Write-in candidates may run in both the primary and general elections. If running in the primary election, write-in candidates must receive the majority of the vote to move on to the general election, just as any other primary election candidate. However, if the number of candidates on the primary ballot is less than the number of candidates the party is entitled to nominate to that office at the primary, then the write-in candidate may advance to the general election if he or she receives votes equal to or greater than the number of signatures required for that office.[1][7]