Texas' 14th Congressional District

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Texas' 14th Congressional District
Texas' 14th.JPG
Current incumbentRandy Weber Republican Party
Population708,198
Gender50.7% Male, 49.3% Female
Race71.7% White, 20.6% Black, 2.7% Asian
Ethnicity23.3% Hispanic
Unemployment9.8%
Median household income$50,178
High school graduation rate84.6%
College graduation rate22.4%
Texas' 14th Congressional District is located in the eastern portion of the state and includes Brazoria, Galveston and Jefferson counties.[1]

The current representative of the 14th Congressional District is Randy Weber (R).

Elections

2014

See also: Texas' 14th Congressional District elections, 2014

The 14th Congressional District of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014. Incumbent Randy Weber (R) defeated Donald Brown (D) and John Wieder (L) in the general election.

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRandy Weber Incumbent 61.8% 89,876
     Democratic Donald Brown 36.1% 52,420
     Libertarian John Wieder 2.1% 3,025
Total Votes 145,321
Source: Texas Secretary of State (100% reporting) Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

2012

See also: Texas' 14th Congressional District elections, 2012

The 14th Congressional District of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which Randy Weber (R) won. He defeated Nick Lampson (D), Zach Grady (L) and Rhett Rosenquest (G) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRandy Weber 53.5% 131,460
     Democratic Nick Lampson 44.6% 109,697
     Libertarian Zach Grady 1.5% 3,619
     Green Rhett Rosenquest Smith 0.4% 1,063
Total Votes 245,839
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Robert Pruett (D) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 76% 140,623
     Democratic Robert Pruett 24% 44,431
Total Votes 185,054

2008
On November 4, 2008, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 100% 191,293
Total Votes 191,293

2006
On November 7, 2006, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Shane Sklar (D) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 60.2% 94,380
     Democratic Shane Sklar 39.8% 62,429
Total Votes 156,809

2004
On November 2, 2004, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 100% 173,668
Total Votes 173,668

2002
On November 5, 2002, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Corby Windham (D) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 68.1% 102,905
     Democratic Corby Windham 31.9% 48,224
Total Votes 151,129

2000
On November 7, 2000, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Loy Sneary (D) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 59.7% 137,370
     Democratic Loy Sneary 40.3% 92,689
Total Votes 230,059

1998
On November 3, 1998, Ron Paul won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Loy Sneary (D) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul incumbent 55.3% 84,459
     Democratic Loy Sneary 44.5% 68,014
     N/A Write-in 0.3% 390
Total Votes 152,863

1996
On November 5, 1996, Ron Paul won election to the United States House. He defeated Charles Morris (R) and Ed Fasanella (Natural Law) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRon Paul 51.1% 99,961
     Democratic Charles Morris 47.6% 93,200
     Natural Law Ed Fasanella 1.3% 2,538
Total Votes 195,699

1994
On November 8, 1994, Greg Laughlin won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jim Deats (R) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Laughlin incumbent 55.6% 86,175
     Republican Jim Deats 44.4% 68,793
Total Votes 154,968

1992
On November 3, 1992, Greg Laughlin won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Humberto Garza (R) and Vic Vreeland (I) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Laughlin incumbent 68.1% 135,930
     Republican Humberto Garza 27.3% 54,412
     Independent Vic Vreeland 4.7% 9,329
Total Votes 199,671

1990
On November 6, 1990, Greg Laughlin won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Joe Dial (R) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 14 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGreg Laughlin incumbent 54.3% 89,251
     Republican Joe Dial 45.7% 75,098
Total Votes 164,349

Redistricting

The 14th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map, approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry, was appealed up to the U.S. Supreme Court before going into effect.[14]

See also

External links

References

  1. Texas Redistricting Map, "Map," accessed July 24, 2012
  2. Politico, "2012 Election Map, Texas," November 6, 2012
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. Washington Times, "High court to ponder Texas redistricting," accessed December 14, 2011