SLP Badge Transparent.png
Read the
State Legislative Tracker
New edition available now!




Texas' 31st Congressional District

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Texas' 31st Congressional District
Texas' 31st.JPG
Current incumbentJohn Carter Republican Party
Population721,698
Gender50.9% Female, 49.1% Male
Race77.0% White, 11.2% Black, 4.4% Asian
Ethnicity23.1% Hispanic
Unemployment9.4%
Median household income$58,960
High school graduation rate90.6%
College graduation rate32.5%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Texas' 31st Congressional District is located in the central portion of the state and includes Bell and Williamson counties.[1]

The current representative of the 31st Congressional District is John Carter (R).

Elections

2014

See also: Texas' 31st Congressional District elections, 2014

The 31st Congressional District of Texas will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Texas' 31st Congressional District elections, 2012

The 31st Congressional District of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which incumbent John Carter (R) won re-election. He defeated Stephen Wyman (D) and Ethan Garofolo (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 31 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn R. Carter Incumbent 61.3% 145,348
     Democratic Stephen M. Wyman 35% 82,977
     Libertarian Ethan Garofalo 3.7% 8,862
Total Votes 237,187
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, John Carter won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bill Oliver (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 31 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Carter incumbent 82.5% 126,384
     Libertarian Bill Oliver 17.5% 26,735
Total Votes 153,119

2008
On November 4, 2008, John Carter won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Brian Ruiz (D) and Barry Cooper (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 31 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Carter incumbent 60.3% 175,563
     Democratic Brian Ruiz 36.6% 106,559
     Libertarian Barry Cooper 3.2% 9,182
Total Votes 291,304

2006
On November 7, 2006, John Carter won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Mary Beth Harrell (D) and Matt McAdoo (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 31 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Carter incumbent 58.5% 90,869
     Democratic Mary Beth Harrell 38.8% 60,293
     Libertarian Matt McAdoo 2.7% 4,221
Total Votes 155,383

2004
On November 2, 2004, John Carter won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jon Porter (D) and Celeste Adams (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 31 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Carter incumbent 64.8% 160,247
     Democratic Jon Porter 32.5% 80,292
     Libertarian Celeste Adams 2.8% 6,888
Total Votes 247,427

2002
On November 5, 2002, John Carter won election to the United States House. He defeated David Bagley (D), Clark Simmons (L), John Petersen (G) and R. C. Crawford (I) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 31 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Carter 69.1% 111,556
     Democratic David Bagley 27.4% 44,183
     Libertarian Clark Simmons 1.3% 2,037
     Green John Petersen 1.2% 1,992
     Independent R. C. Crawford 1.1% 1,716
Total Votes 161,484

Redistricting

The 31st Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map, approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry, was appealed up to the U.S. Supreme Court before going into effect.[8]

External links

See also

References