Texas' 4th Congressional District elections, 2014

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2012

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Texas' 4th Congressional District

General Election Date
November 4, 2014

Primary Date
March 4, 2014

Incumbent prior to election:
Ralph Hall Republican Party
Ralph Hall.jpg

Race Ratings
Cook Political Report: Solid R[1]

Sabato's Crystal Ball: Safe R[2]


Texas U.S. House Elections
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2014 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Texas.png
The 4th Congressional District of Texas will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

Incumbent Ralph Hall (R) was defeated by primary challenger John Ratcliffe in 2014. Since he only received 45 percent of the primary vote, he was forced to face Ratcliffe in the primary runoff election. Ratcliffe won the runoff by roughly 5 percent. Hall was the only incumbent in Texas to lose to a primary challenger in 2014. Ratcliffe will go on to win election in November, unopposed.

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
December 9, 2013
March 4, 2014
November 4, 2014

Primary: Texas is one of 21 states with a mixed primary system. Voters do not have to register with a party. At the primary, they may choose which party primary ballot to vote on, but in order to vote they must sign a pledge declaring they will not vote in another party's primary or convention that year.[3][4]

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by February 2, 2014. For the general election, the voter registration deadline is October 5, 2014 (30 days prior to election).[5]

See also: Texas elections, 2014

Incumbent: Heading into the election the incumbent was Ralph Hall (R), who was first elected in 1980. Incumbent Hall was defeated in the primary.

Texas' 4th Congressional District is located in the northeastern portion of the state and includes Grayson, Collin, Rockwall, Hunt, Fannin, Lamar, Delta, Hopkins, Rains, Camp, Upshur, Franklin, Red River, Bowie, Cass, Marion, Morris and Titus counties.[6]

Candidates

General election candidates

Republican Party John Ratcliffe


May 27, 2014, Republican primary runoff candidates

March 4, 2014, primary results

Republican Party Republican Primary

Primary results

U.S. House, Texas District 4 Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRalph Hall Incumbent 45.4% 29,848
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Ratcliffe 28.8% 18,917
Lou Gigliotti 16.1% 10,601
John Stacy 4.3% 2,812
Brent Lawson 3.5% 2,290
Tony Arterburn 1.9% 1,252
Total Votes 65,720
Source: Texas Secretary of State
U.S. House, Texas District 4 Runoff Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Ratcliffe 52.8% 22,271
Ralph Hall Incumbent 47.2% 19,899
Total Votes 42,170
Source: Texas Secretary of State Vote totals above are unofficial and will be updated once official totals are made available.

Polls

Ralph Hall vs. John Ratcliffe
Poll Ralph Hall John RatcliffeNot sureMargin of ErrorSample Size
Gravis Marketing (May 15, 2014)
46%18%16%+/-4656
Wenzel Strategies (March 12-13, 2014)
35%47%17%+/-3.9436
AVERAGES 40.5% 32.5% 16.5% +/-3.95 546
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Media

Now or Never PAC


Now or Never PAC's March 2014 ad.

Ralph Hall


Congressman Ralph Hall - TX04

Ad comparing Hall to Ratcliffe

John Ratcliffe


A New Generation of Conservative Leadership

John Ratcliffe - The Next Generation

Endorsements

Ralph Hall

Hall received the endorsement of third place primary finisher Lou Gigliotti in his upcoming primary runoff battle with John Ratcliffe. Gigliotti said, "If it’s not me then it’s gotta be Ralph. He’ll do a good job for another two years. I can tell you this: it was a chore to get voters in this district to vote for anyone but Ralph."[7]

Hall also received the endorsement of another former primary challenger, Tony Arterburn.[8]

John Ratcliffe

Ratcliffe received the endorsement of State Rep. Jodie Laubenberg on March 11, 2014. She said "I am very confident that John Ratcliffe is the person who will step up to defend liberty for this generation. I am proud to endorse John Ratcliffe for Congress."[9]

Ratcliffe also received the endorsement of the Club for Growth PAC in March.[10]

The Senate Conservatives Fund (SCF) endorsed Ratcliffe on April 11, 2014. SCF Executive Director Matt Hoskins said, "John Ratcliffe is a principled, conservative leader who will fight to stop the massive spending and debt in Washington that are bankrupting our country. He's part of a new generation of conservative Republicans, and we're excited to support him."[11]

Key votes

Below are important votes the current incumbent cast during the 113th Congress.

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Voted "Yes" On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[12] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[13] Ralph Hall voted in favor of the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[14]

Voted "No" The shutdown finally ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[15] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Ralph Hall voted against HR 2775.[16]

Campaign contributions

Ralph Hall

Ralph Hall (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[17]April 15, 2013$48,967.06$35,000.00$(68,224.78)$15,742.28
July Quarterly[18]July 14, 2013$15,742.28$129,736.09$(42,239.26)$103,239.11
October Quarterly[19]October 13, 2013$103,239.11$43,429.34$(38,689.36)$107,979.09
Year-End[20]January 29, 2014$107,979$62,050$(58,581)$111,447
Pre-Primary[21]February 20, 2014$111,447$117,588$(89,336)$139,699
April Quarterly[22]April 14, 2014$139,699$213,375$(176,104)$176,969
Running totals
$601,178.43$(473,174.4)

John Ratcliffe

John Ratcliffe (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
Year-End[23]January 13, 2014$0$471,427$(39,713)$431,713
Pre-Primary[24]February 20, 2014$431,713$70,273$(300,213)$201,773
April Quarterly[25]April 15, 2014$201,773$271,280$(314,477)$158,325
Pre-Runoff[26]May 16, 2014$158,325$142,955$(111,594)$189,686
July Quarterly[27]July 15, 2014$189,686$186,789$(356,774)$23,325
Running totals
$1,142,724$(1,122,771)

**As of the 2014 July Quarterly Report, Ratcliffe's committee owed $685,300 in outstanding loans to John Ratcliffe.

Tony Arterburn

Tony Arterburn (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
July Quarterly[28]August 14, 2013$0$17,154$(16,967)$187
October Quarterly[29]October 10, 2013$187$45,152$(43,629)$1,710
Year-End[30]January 27, 2014$1,710$28,045$(21,484)$8,272
Running totals
$90,351$(82,080)

John Stacy

John Stacy (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
Year-End[31]January 30, 2014$0$16,025$(11,647)$4,377
Running totals
$16,025$(11,647)

Brent Lawson

Brent Lawson (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[32]April 22, 2013$0$1,125$(38)$1,087
July Quarterly[33]July 25, 2013$1,087$2,624$(2,471)$1,239
October Quarterly[34]October 24, 2013$1,239$4,236$(1,478)$3,998
Running totals
$7,985$(3,987)

Lou Gigliotti

Lou Gigliotti (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[35]April 14, 2013$1,694$0$(0)$1,694
July Quarterly[36]July 12, 2013$1,694$300$(0)$1,994
October Quarterly[37]October 14, 2013$1,994$7,892$(4,967)$4,919
Year-End[38]January 10, 2014$4,919$80,457$(5,719)$79,656
Running totals
$88,649$(10,686)

District history

Candidate Ballot Access
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Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

2012

The 4th Congressional District of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012, in which incumbent Ralph Hall (R) won re-election. He defeated VaLinda Hathcox (D) and Thomas Griffing (L) in the general election.[39]

U.S. House, Texas District 4 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRalph M. Hall Incumbent 73% 182,679
     Democratic VaLinda Hathcox 24.1% 60,214
     Libertarian Thomas Griffing 2.9% 7,262
     Write-in Fred Rostek 0.1% 188
Total Votes 250,343
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010

On November 2, 2010, Ralph Hall won re-election to the United States House. He defeated VaLinda Hathcox (D), Jim Prindle (L) and Shane Shepard (I) in the general election.[40]

U.S. House, Texas District 4 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngRalph Hall incumbent 73.2% 136,338
     Democratic VaLinda Hathcox 22% 40,975
     Libertarian Jim Prindle 2.5% 4,729
     Independent Shane Shepard 2.3% 4,244
Total Votes 186,286

See also

External links

References

  1. Cook Political Report, "2014 HOUSE RACE RATINGS FOR June 26, 2014," accessed July 28, 2014
  2. Sabato's Crystal Ball, "2014 House Races," accessed July 28, 2014
  3. Fair Vote, "Congressional and Presidential Primaries: Open, Closed, Semi-Closed, and 'Top Two,'" accessed January 2, 2014
  4. Texas Statutes, "Section 172.086," accessed January 3, 2014
  5. VoteTexas.gov, "Register to Vote," accessed January 3, 2014
  6. Texas Redistricting Map "Map" accessed July 24, 2012
  7. Politico, "Texas 3rd placer backs incumbent Ralph Hall," March 5, 2014
  8. WFAA.com, "Rep. Ralph Hall gets endorsements from two of four opponents," March 16, 2014
  9. John Ratcliffe campaign website, "State Rep. Laubenberg Endorses Ratcliffe in Runoff," March 11, 2014
  10. Club for Growth, "John Ratcliffe (TX-04)," accessed March 26, 2014
  11. The Hill, "Senate Conservatives Fund backs Ralph Hall challenger," April 11, 2014
  12. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  13. Buzzfeed, "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013
  14. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  15. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  16. U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013
  17. Federal Election Commission, "Ralph Hall April Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2013
  18. Federal Election Commission, "Ralph Hall July Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2013
  19. Federal Election Commission, "Ralph Hall October Quarterly," accessed October 22, 2013
  20. Federal Election Commission, "Ralph Hall Year-End," accessed February 6, 2014
  21. Federal Election Commission, "Ralph Hall Pre-Primary," accessed April 20, 2014
  22. Federal Election Commission, "Ralph Hall April Quarterly," accessed April 20, 2014
  23. Federal Election Commission, "John Ratcliffe Year-End," accessed February 13, 2014
  24. Federal Election Commission, "John Ratcliffe Pre-Primary," accessed May 2, 2014
  25. Federal Election Commission, "John Ratcliffe April Quarterly," accessed May 2, 2014
  26. Federal Election Commission, "John Ratcliffe Pre-Primary," accessed July 25, 2014
  27. Federal Election Commission, "John Ratcliffe July Quarterly," accessed July 25, 2014
  28. Federal Election Commission, "Tony Arterburn July Quarterly," accessed February 4, 2014
  29. Federal Election Commission, "Tony Arterburn October Quarterly," accessed February 4, 2014
  30. Federal Election Commission, "Tony Arterburn Year-End," accessed February 4, 2014
  31. Federal Election Commission, "John Stacy Year-End," accessed February 13, 2014
  32. Federal Election Commission, "Brent Lawson April Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  33. Federal Election Commission, "Brent Lawson July Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  34. Federal Election Commission, "Brent Lawson October Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  35. Federal Election Commission, "Lou Gigliotti April Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  36. Federal Election Commission, "Lou Gigliotti July Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  37. Federal Election Commission, "Lou Gigliotti October Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  38. Federal Election Commission, "Lou Gigliotti Year-End," accessed February 13, 2014
  39. Politico, "2012 Election Map, Texas," November 6, 2012
  40. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013