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Tom Udall

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Tom Udall
Tom Udall.jpg
U.S. Senate, New Mexico
Incumbent
In office
January 3, 2009
Term ends
January 3, 2015
Years in position 5
PartyDemocratic
PredecessorPete V. Domenici (R)
Compensation
Base salary$174,000/year
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 4, 2008
First electedNovember 4, 2008
Next general November 4, 2014
Campaign $$9,660,385
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
U.S. House of Representatives from New Mexico's 3rd District
1999-2009
Attorney General of New Mexico
1991–1999
Education
Bachelor'sPrescott College
J.D.University of New Mexico
OtherCambridge University (LL.B.)
Personal
BirthdayMay 18, 1948
Place of birthTucson, Arizona
ProfessionAttorney
Net worth$2,668,017
ReligionThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon)
Websites
Office website
Campaign website
Thomas Stewart "Tom" Udall (b. May 18, 1948, in Tucson, Arizona) is a Democratic member of the United States Senate from New Mexico. He is currently serving his first term in the Senate, having won election in 2008.[1] He defeated Republican Steve Pearce in the general election on November 4, 2008, to win the seat.

Udall was sworn into office on January 3, 2009, for a six year term which will expire on January 3, 2015. Udall is seeking re-election to the U.S. Senate from New Mexico. The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

Prior to his election to the U.S. Senate, Udall served five consecutive terms in the U.S. House, representing the 3rd Congressional District of New Mexico. He is also a former two-term state attorney general for New Mexico, serving from 1991-1999.[2]

Before entering politics, Udall worked as an attorney. He started as a Law Clerk to Chief Judge Oliver Seth of the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. His legal career then included appointments as Assistant US Attorney in the criminal division and Chief Counsel to the Department of Health and Environment. A partnership followed in the Miller Law Firm.[3]

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Udall is an average Democratic member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Democratic Party on the majority of bills.

Biography

Udall was born in Tucson, Arizona. He attended Prescott College, graduating with a pre-law degree in 1970. In 1975, he graduated from Cambridge University in England with a Bachelor of Law degree. That fall, he enrolled in the University of New Mexico School of Law and graduated with a Juris Doctor in 1977.[4]

Udall is the son of Stewart Udall, who was Secretary of the Interior from 1961 to 1969, nephew of Arizona Congressman Morris Udall, first cousin of Colorado Senator Mark Udall, double second cousin of former Oregon Senator Gordon Smith and second cousin of Utah Senator Mike Lee.[5]

Career

Below is an abbreviated outline of Udall's academic, professional and political career:

  • 1991-1999: Attorney General of New Mexico
  • 1999-2009: U.S. House Representative for New Mexico's 3rd District
  • 2009-present: U.S. Senator for New Mexico

Committee assignments

U.S. Senate

2013-2014

Udall serves on the following Senate committees:[6]

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government Members
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies
  • Committee on Environment and Public Works
    • Subcommittee on Transportation and Infrastructure
    • Subcommittee on Superfund, Toxics and Environmental Health
    • Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety
  • Committee on Foreign Relations
    • The Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere, Peace Corps and Global Narcotics Affairs Chair
    • The Subcommittee on International Development and Foreign Assistance, Economic Affairs and International Environmental Protection, and Peace Corps
    • The Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs
    • The Subcommittee on African Affairs
  • Committee on Indian Affairs
  • Committee on Rules and Administration

2011-2012

Udall served on the following committees:[7]

  • Committee on Foreign Relations
    • Subcommittee on International Development and Foreign Assistance, Economic Affairs, and International Environmental Protection
    • Subcommittee on Near Eastern and South and Central Asian Affairs
    • Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere, Peace Corps, and Global Narcotics Affairs
    • Subcommittee on African Affairs
  • Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
    • Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security
    • Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet
    • Subcommittee on Competitiveness, Innovation, and Export Promotion
    • Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, and Insurance
    • Subcommittee on Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety, and Security
  • Committee on Environment and Public Works
    • Subcommittee on Children’s Health and Environmental Responsibility (Chairman)
    • Subcommittee on Oversight
    • Subcommittee on Transportation and Infrastructure
    • Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife
  • Committee on Indian Affairs
  • Committee on Rules and Administration

Key votes

113th Congress

CongressLogo.png

The 113th Congress has had 55 out of 5,401 introduced bills enacted into law (1%) as of November 30, 2013. Comparatively, the 112th Congress had 1.14% of introduced bills enacted into law in the first session.[8] For more information pertaining to Udall's voting record in the 113th Congress, please see the below sections.[9]

National security

Committee vote on Syria

Voted "No" On September 4, 2013, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee narrowly approved an authorization for President Obama to use limited force against Syria.[10][11]

The vote came after a three-hour briefing with top Obama administration officials, including Secretary of State John Kerry and James Clapper, the director of national intelligence.[12]

Of the nine Democratic members and eight Republican members that make up the committee, seven Democrats and three Republicans voted in favor, while five Republicans and two Democrats opposed the authorization.[12] A single "present" vote was cast by Ed Markey (D). Udall was one of the two Democrats who opposed the authorization.[13]

Iranian sanctions support

Voted "Yes" Udall voted in support of S Res 65 - A resolution strongly supporting the full implementation of United States and international sanctions on Iran and urging the President to continue to strengthen enforcement of sanctions legislation. The resolution passed in the Senate by a vote of 99-0 on May 22, 2013.[14]

John Brennan CIA nomination

See also: Rand Paul filibuster of John Brennan's CIA Nomination in March 2013

Voted "Yes" Udall voted in support of the confirmation of John Brennan as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. The nomination was confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 63-34 on March 7, 2013. Most Democrats supported the nomination, while Republicans were somewhat divided with roughly one-third supporting the nomination.[15]

Economy

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Voted "Yes" During the shutdown in October 2013, the Senate rejected, down party lines, every House-originated bill that stripped the budget of funding for the Affordable Care Act. A deal was reached late on October 16, 2013, just hours before the debt ceiling deadline. The bill to reopen the government, H.R. 2775, lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[16] The final vote on H.R. 2775 was 81-18, with all 18 votes against the bill from Republican members. Udall voted with the Democratic Party for the bill.[17]

Student loan interest rates

Voted "No" Udall voted in opposition of HR 1911 - To amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to establish interest rates for new loans made on or after July 1, 2013. The bill passed in the Senate by a vote of 81-18 on July 24, 2013. The purpose of the bill was to set interest rates for student loans retroactively. Some Democrats split on the bill.[18]

No Budget, No Pay Act of 2013

Voted "Yes" Udall voted in support of HR 325 - A bill to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and for other purposes. The bill passed in the Senate by a vote of 64-34 on January 31, 2013. The purpose of the bill was to temporarily suspend the debt ceiling and withhold the pay of members of Congress until a budget could be passed. The vote largely followed party lines with Democrats overwhelmingly supporting it and many Republicans in opposition to the bill.[19]

Immigration

Mexico-U.S. border

Voted "No" Udall voted in opposition of Thune Amdt. No. 1197 - Requires the Completion of the Fence Along the United States-Mexico Border. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 39-54 on June 18, 2013. The purpose of the amendment was to require the completion of 350 miles of fence described in the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 before registered provisional immigrant status may be granted. It would also require 700 miles of fence be completed before the status of registered provisional immigrants may be changed to permanent resident status. The vote followed party lines.[20]

Healthcare

Defund Affordable Care Act

Voted "No" Udall voted in opposition of Cruz Amdt. No. 30 - To prohibit the use of funds to carry out the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 45-52 on March 13, 2013. The purpose of the amendment was to block funding for the healthcare program. Voting was split along party lines.[21]

Social issues

Background checks on gun sales

Voted "Yes" Udall voted in support of Manchin Amdt. No. 715 - To protect Second Amendment rights, ensure that all individuals who should be prohibited from buying a firearm are listed in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, and provide a responsible and consistent background check process. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 54-46 on April 17, 2013. The purpose of the amendment was to extend background checks for gun sales to gun shows and internet sales. Five democrats voted in opposition of the amendment, while four Republicans supported it.[22]

Assault weapon ban

Voted "No" Udall voted in opposition of Feinstein Amdt. No. 711 - To regulate assault weapons, to ensure that the right to keep and bear arms is not unlimited, and for other purposes. The purpose of the bill was to ban the future sale, manufacturing and possession of assault weapons. The amendment failed in the Senate by a vote of 40-60 on April 17, 2013. One Republican voted in support of the amendment while fifteen democrats voted in opposition.[23]

Violence Against Women (2013)

Voted "Yes" Udall voted in support of S 47 - A bill to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 1994. The bill was passed in the Senate by a vote of 78-22 on February 12, 2013. The purpose of the bill was to combat violence against women, from domestic violence to international trafficking in persons. All 22 dissenting votes were cast by Republicans.[24]

Previous congressional sessions

Fiscal Cliff

Voted "Yes" Udall voted for the fiscal cliff compromise bill, which made permanent most of the Bush tax cuts originally passed in 2001 and 2003 while also raising tax rates on the highest income levels. The bill was passed in the Senate by a 89-8 vote on January 1, 2013.[25]

Issues

On The Issues Vote Match

Tom Udall's Vote Match results from On The Issues.
See also: On The Issues Vote Match

On The Issues conducts a VoteMatch analysis of elected officials based on 20 issue areas. Rather than relying on incumbents to complete the quiz themselves, the VoteMatch analysis is conducted using voting records, statements to the media, debate transcripts or citations from books authored by or about the candidate. Based on the results of the quiz, Udall is a Hard-Core Liberal. Udall received a score of 76 percent on social issues and 9 percent on economic issues.[26]

On The Issues organization logo.

The table below contains the results of analysis compiled by staff at On The Issues.

On The Issues Vote Quiz[27]
Economic Issues Social Issues
Issue Stance Issue Stance
Legally require hiring women & minorities Strongly Favors Abortion is a woman's unrestricted right Strongly Favors
Expand ObamaCare Strongly Favors Comfortable with same-sex marriage Strongly Favors
Vouchers for school choice Strongly Opposes Keep God in the public sphere Strongly Opposes
Absolute right to gun ownership Strongly Opposes Human needs over animal rights Strongly Opposes
Higher taxes on the wealthy Strongly Favors Stricter punishment reduces crime Opposes
Support & expand free trade Opposes Pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens Strongly Favors
Stricter limits on political campaign funds Favors Maintain US sovereignty from UN Strongly Opposes
Prioritize green energy Strongly Favors Expand the military Opposes
Stimulus better than market-led recovery Neutral Stay out of Iran Strongly Favors
Privatize Social Security Opposes Never legalize marijuana Opposes
Note: Information last updated: 2014.[26]

Political positions

American response in Syria

See also: United States involvement in Syria

On Sept. 4, 2013, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, of which Udall is a member, passed a resolution authorizing President Barack Obama's proposed military strikes against Syria. The resolution was approved by the committee despite Udall's protestations. One of only two holdouts on the committee, along with Chris Murphy (D-CT), Udall took up the cause of dissuading his colleagues from pursuing such action on his campaign site homepage: "These weapons could one day be turned against the U.S. and our allies. Instead, we should focus on humanitarian assistance to the Syrian people and diplomatic efforts to end this horrific civil war," he stated. Udall then directly addressed his fellow members of Congress with a plea to not "risk putting weapons in the hands of groups who could use them against us and our allies in the future." Udall also added a prompt to sign an electronic petition titled "I stand with Senator Tom Udall. Don’t intervene in Syria by sending weapons."[28]

Elections

2014

See also: United States Senate elections in New Mexico, 2014

Udall is running for re-election in the 2014 election for the U.S. Senate, representing New Mexico. Udall ran uncontested for the Democratic nomination in the primary on June 3, 2014.[29] The general election takes place November 4, 2014.

2008

On November 4, 2008, Tom Udall won election to the United States Senate. He defeated Steve Pearce (R) in the general election.[30]

U.S. Senate, New Mexico General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngTom Udall 61.3% 505,128
     Republican Steve Pearce 38.7% 318,522
Total Votes 823,650

[31]

Full history


Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Udall is available dating back to 2000. Based on available campaign finance records, Udall raised a total of $9,660,385 during that time period. This information was last updated on April 22, 2013.[37]

Tom Udall's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2008 US Senate (New Mexico) Won $7,447,684
2006 US House (New Mexico, District 3) Won $515,102
2004 US House (New Mexico, District 3) Won $493,951
2002 US House (New Mexico, District 3) Won $430,721
2000 US House (New Mexico, District 3) Won $772,927
Grand Total Raised $9,660,385

2014

Candidates for Congress are required to file reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Tom Udall's reports.

Tom Udall (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[38]4/15/2013$352,569.29$979,996.68$(231,309.54)$919,256.43
July Quarterly[39]7/15/2013$919,256.43$874,584.26$(263,758.97)$1,530,081.72
October Quarterly[40]10/15/2013$1,530,081.72$642,240.33$(308,654.92)$1,863,667.13
Year-End Quarterly[41]12/31/2013$1,863,667$779,551$(312,793)$2,369,291
April Quarterly[42]April 15, 2014$2,369,291.40$1,010,599.78$(262,077.48)$3,117,813.70
Running totals
$4,286,972.05$(1,378,593.91)


2008

Breakdown of the source of Udall's campaign funds before the 2008 election.
Udall was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2008. His campaign committee raised a total of $7,447,684 and spent $7,841,887.[43]


Personal Gain Index

Congressional Personal Gain Index graphic.png
See also: Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress)

The Personal Gain Index (U.S. Congress) is a four-part measurement that illustrates the extent to which members of the U.S. Congress have prospered during their tenure as public servants.
It consists of four different metrics:

PGI: Change in net worth

See also: Changes in Net Worth of U.S. Senators and Representatives (Personal Gain Index) and Net worth of United States Senators and Representatives
Net Worth Metric graphic.png

Based on congressional financial disclosure forms and calculations made available by OpenSecrets.org, Udall's net worth as of 2012 was estimated between $1,674,044 and $4,088,000. That averages to $2,881,022, which is lower than the average net worth of Democratic senators in 2012 of $13,566,333.90. Udall ranked as the 47th most wealthy senator in 2012.[44] Between 2004 and 2012, Udall's calculated net worth[45] decreased by an average of 2 percent per year. Between 2004 and 2012, the average annual percentage increase for a member of Congress was 15.4 percent.[46]

Tom Udall Yearly Net Worth
YearAverage Net Worth
2004$3,280,927
2012$2,881,022
Growth from 2004 to 2012:-12%
Average annual growth:-2%[47]
Comparatively, the American citizen experienced a median yearly decline in net worth of -0.94%.[48]
The data used to calculate changes in net worth may include changes resulting from assets gained through marriage, inheritance, changes in family estates and/or trusts, changes in family business ownership and many other variables unrelated to a member's behavior in Congress.

Analysis

Ideology and leadership

See also: GovTrack's Political Spectrum & Legislative Leadership ranking

Based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack, Udall is a "rank-and-file Democrat" as of July 2014.[49] This was the same rating Udall received in July 2013.

Like-minded colleagues

The website OpenCongress tracks the voting records of each member to determine with whom he or she votes most and least often. The results include a member from each party.[50]

Udall most often votes with:

Udall least often votes with:

Lifetime voting record

See also: Lifetime voting records of United States Senators and Representatives

According to the website GovTrack, Udall missed 20 of 1,713 roll call votes from January 2009 to July 2014. This amounts to 1.2 percent, which is better than the median of 2.0 percent among current senators as of July 2014.[51]

Congressional staff salaries

See also: Staff salaries of United States Senators and Representatives

The website Legistorm compiles staff salary information for members of Congress. Udall paid his congressional staff a total of $2,695,139 in 2011. He ranked 27th on the list of the lowest paid Democratic senatorial staff salaries and ranked 67th overall of the lowest paid senatorial staff salaries in 2011. Overall, New Mexico ranked 32nd in average salary for senatorial staff. The average U.S. Senate congressional staff was paid $2,529,141.70 in fiscal year 2011.[52]

National Journal vote ratings

See also: National Journal vote ratings

Each year National Journal publishes an analysis of how liberally or conservatively each member of Congress voted in the previous year. Click the link above for the full ratings of all members of Congress.

2013

Udall ranked 32nd in the liberal rankings in 2013.[53]

2012

Udall ranked 1st in the liberal rankings in 2012.[54]

2011

Udall ranked 5th in the liberal rankings in 2011.[55]

Voting with Party

The website OpenCongress tracks how often members of Congress vote with the majority of the chamber caucus.

2014

Udall voted with the Democratic Party 93.1 percent of the time, which ranked 37th among the 53 Senate Democratic members as of July 2014.[56]

2013

Udall voted with the Democratic Party 92.5 percent of the time, which ranked 37th among the 52 Senate Democratic members as of June 2013.[57]

2011

Udall voted with the Democratic Party 95.4 percent of the time, which ranked 14th among the 51 Senate Democratic members as of November 2011.[58]

Personal

Udall is married to Jill Cooper, and they have one grown daughter.[59]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Tom + Udall + New Mexico + Senate

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Tom Udall News Feed

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See also

External links


References

  1. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008"
  2. Project Vote Smart, "Senator Tom Udall's Biography," accessed July 29, 2013
  3. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, "UDALL, Thomas (Tom), (1948 - )"
  4. Tom Udall, United States Senator for New Mexico, "About Tom - Biography"
  5. The Political Graveyard: Index to Politicians, "Uban to Underholz"
  6. Congressional Quarterly, "Senate Committee List," accessed January 22, 2013
  7. Tom Udall, United States Senator for New Mexico, "About Tom - Committee Assignments"
  8. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, First Session of the 112th Congress," accessed September 5, 2013
  9. Congressional Record, "Resume of Congressional Activity, Second Session of the 113th Congress," accessed March 4, 2014
  10. Politico, "Senate panel approves Syria measure," accessed September 5, 2013
  11. USA Today, "Senate committee approves Syria attack resolution," accessed September 5, 2013
  12. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named syriacommitteevote
  13. Politico, "How Senate Foreign Relations Committee members voted on Syria," accessed September 5, 2013
  14. Washington Post, "S RES 65," May 22, 2013
  15. Washington Post, "Confirmation of John Owen Brennan," March 7, 2013
  16. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  17. Senate.gov, "H.R. 2775 As Amended," accessed October 31, 2013
  18. Washington Post, "HR 1911," July 24, 2013
  19. Washington Post, "HR 325," January 31, 2013
  20. Washington Post, "S 744," June 18, 2013
  21. Washington Post, "HR 933," March 13, 2013
  22. Washington Post, "S 649 Expand background check to gun shows and Internet," April 17, 2013
  23. Washington Post, "S 649 Ban assault weapons," April 17, 2013
  24. Washington Post, "S 47," February 12, 2013
  25. U.S. Senate, "Roll Call Vote on the Fiscal Cliff," accessed January 4, 2013
  26. 26.0 26.1 On The Issues, "Tom Udall Vote Match," accessed June 23, 2014
  27. The questions in the quiz are broken down into two sections -- social and economic. In social questions, liberals and libertarians agree in choosing the less-government answers, while conservatives and populists agree in choosing the more-restrictive answers. For the economic questions, conservatives and libertarians agree in choosing the less-government answers, while liberals and populists agree in choosing the more-restrictive answers.
  28. Tom Udall for US Senate, "Tell Congress: Don't rush into Syrian War," accessed September 5, 2013
  29. Associated Press, "New Mexico Summary Vote Results," June 3, 2014
  30. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  31. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008"
  32. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  33. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  34. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  35. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  36. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  37. OpenSecrets, "Career Fundraising for Tom Udall," accessed April 22, 2013
  38. Federal Election Commission, "Udall For Us All April Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  39. Federal Election Commission, "Udall For Us All July Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  40. Federal Election Commission, "Udall For Us All October Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  41. Federal Election Commission, "Udall For Us All Year-End Quarterly," accessed February 13, 2014
  42. Federal Election Commission, "Udall For Us All April Quarterly," accessed May 16, 2014
  43. OpenSecrets, "Tom Udall 2008 Election Data," accessed October 31, 2011
  44. OpenSecrets, "Udall, (D-NM), 2012," accessed February 18, 2014
  45. This figure represents the average annual percentage growth from either 2004 (if the member entered office in 2004 or earlier) or their first year in office (as noted in the chart below) to 2012, divided by the number of years calculated.
  46. This number was found by dividing each member's total net worth growth percentage by the number of years included in the calculation.
  47. This figure represents the total percentage growth divided by the number of years for which there are net worth figures for each member.
  48. This figure was calculated using median asset data from the Census Bureau. Please see the Congressional Net Worth data for Ballotpedia spreadsheet for more information on this calculation.
  49. GovTrack, "Tom Udall," accessed July 24, 2014
  50. OpenCongress, "Sen. Tom Udall," accessed July 24, 2014
  51. GovTrack, "Tom Udall," accessed July 24, 2014
  52. LegiStorm, "Tom Udall"
  53. National Journal, "2013 Congressional Vote Ratings," accessed July 24, 2014
  54. National Journal, "2012 Congressional Vote Ratings," accessed March 6, 2013
  55. National Journal, "Searchable Vote Ratings Tables: House," accessed February 23, 2012
  56. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  57. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  58. OpenCongress, "Voting With Party," accessed July 2014
  59. Tom Udall, United States Senator for New Mexico, "About Tom - Biography"
Political offices
Preceded by
Pete Domenici
United States Senate - New Mexico
2009-Present
Succeeded by
-
Preceded by
Bill Redmond
U.S. House of Representatives - District 3
1999-2009
Succeeded by
Ben R. Luján
Preceded by
Harold Stratton
Attorney General of New Mexico
1991-1999
Succeeded by
Patricia Madrid