U.S. Department of Transportation

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Department of Transportation
US-DeptOfTransportation-Seal.svg
Secretary:Anthony Foxx
Deputy Secretary:John D. Porcari
Annual budget:$122.5 billion (2012)
Total employed:57,703 (2012)
Year created:1966
Official website:http://www.dot.gov

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Executive Departments of the United States

Executive Departments
Department of DefenseDepartment of StateDepartment of Homeland SecurityDepartment of JusticeDepartment of CommerceDepartment of EducationDepartment of the TreasuryDepartment of AgricultureDepartment of EnergyDepartment of LaborDepartment of TransportationDepartment of the InteriorDepartment of Health and Human ServicesDepartment of Veterans AffairsDepartment of Housing and Urban Development

Department Secretaries
Chuck HagelJohn KerryJeh JohnsonEric HolderPenny PritzkerArne DuncanJack LewTom VilsackErnest MonizTom PerezAnthony FoxxSally JewellSylvia Mathews BurwellRobert McDonaldJulian Castro
The Department of Transportation is a United States executive department established in 1966. The Department was formed to ensure "a fast, safe, efficient, accessible and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people."[1] The Department is led by the current Secretary of Transportation, Anthony Foxx.

The Department employs 57,703 employees. The operating budget for fiscal year 2012 was $122.5 billion. Among the agencies run by the Department are the: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Federal Transportation Administration (FTA), Federal Highway Administration (FHA), Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Federal Highway Traffic Safety Administration (FHTSA), the Maritime Administration (MARAD) and more.[2]

History

The Transportation Department was formed by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966. Like the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Transportation Department has its roots based on the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Upon its formation, the Department inherited agencies such as the Federal Aviation Administration and gained regulatory power over recent federally constructed roadways and railway programs.[3] The following is a list of important dates throughout the history of the Department:[4]

  • 1966: Department of Transportation formed by Public Law 89-670
  • 1966: Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority (WMTA) formed
  • 1967: Department of Transportation officially operational
  • 1968: Federal motor vehicle standards come into effect
  • 1970: Amtrak formed
  • 1976: Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act passed, allowing "free zones" where railroads can raise and lower fares without federal review
  • 1977: Mandates on automatic seatbelts or air bags reinstated starting in 1984
  • 1981: 12,000 air traffic controllers go on strike; approximately 11,000 fired by President Reagan
  • 1990: Smoking prohibited on domestic flights lasting fewer than six hours
  • 1990: National System of Interstate and Defense Highways redesignated the Dwight D. Eisenhower System of Interstate and Defense Highways
  • 2002: Transportation Security Administration formed then transferred to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security
  • 2007: Interstate 35 bridge across the Mississippi River collapsed

Structure

Mission

The Department of Transportation website states the mission:[1]

Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people, today and into the future.[5]

Leadership

The current Secretary of Transportation is Anthony Foxx.

Note: Votes marked "N/A" represent voice votes or unrecorded votes. Missing votes will be added as they are researched.


Departments

Office of the Secretary of Transportation

According to the Department's official website, the Office of the Secretary:[6]

  • Oversees national transportation policies
  • Negotiates and implements international transportation policies
  • Regulates United States airlines
  • Issues preventative regulations in transportation policy in regard to drug and alcohol abuse.

Analysis

Budget

The Department of Transportation had a budget of $122.5 billion for the fiscal year 2012. The Department's request for fiscal year 2013 was $74.4 billion, a 39.3% decrease. The 2012 budget included $50 billion for infrastructure repairs that was not included in the 2011 or 2013 budgets.[2]

Employment

The Best Places to work in the Federal Government is a website that tracks workforce trends in federal agencies. According to their analysis, from 2008-2012, the Department of Education has lost an average of 896 jobs per year.[7]

Sequestration

Secretary Ray LaHood stated on February 22, 2013, that the Department needed to cut nearly $1 billion which would include furloughs for all FAA employees amounting to one day per pay period.[8]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term U.S. + Department + Transportation

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

U.S. Department of Transportation News Feed

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See also

External links

References