United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Southern District of Iowa
Eighth Circuit
IA-SD Seal.png
Judges: 2
Posts: 3
Vacancies: 1
Active judges
Chief:  
Senior Judges
Magistrate Judges
Chief Magistrate: Celeste Bremer
Former Judges
Key:
(Numbers indicate % of seats vacant.)
0%0%-10%
10%-25%25%-40%
More than 40%

The United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa is one of ninety-four United States district courts. It is headquartered in Des Moines, with satellite facilities in Council Bluffs and Davenport. When decisions of the court are appealed, they are appealed to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals based in St. Louis at the Thomas F. Eagleton Federal Courthouse and Building.

The United States Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court. The current district attorney is Nicholas A. Klinefeldt.[1]

Vacancy warning level

The United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa's vacancy warning level is orange. The court currently has one vacancy.

Pending nominations

There are no pending nominations for the United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa.


Active judges

Article III judges

JudgeBornHomeAppointed byActiveChiefPreceededBachelorsLaw
Judge John Jarvey1956Minneapolis, MNW. Bush 3/14/2007 - PresentRonald LongstaffUniversity of Akron, B.S., 1978Drake U. School of Law, J.D., 1981
Judge Stephanie Rose1972Topeka, KSObama 9/10/2012 - PresentRobert PrattUniversity of Iowa, B.A., 1994University of Iowa Law, J.D., 1996


Active Article III judges by appointing political party

This graph displays the percent of active judges by the party of the appointing president and does not reflect how a judge may rule on specific cases or their own political preferences.

pChart

Senior judges

JudgeAppointed byActiveChiefSeniorBachelorsLaw
Senior Judge Robert PrattClinton May 27, 1997 - 7/1/20122006 - 20117/1/2012 - PresentLoras College, B.A., 1969Creighton U. School of Law, J.D., 1972
Senior Judge Charles WolleReagan 8/6/1987 - 10/16/20011992 - 200110/16/2001 - PresentHarvard College, A.B., 1959University of Iowa College of Law, J.D., 1961
Senior Judge James GritznerW. Bush 2/19/2002-3/1/20152011-20153/1/2015-PresentDakota Wesleyan University, 1969Drake University Law School, 1979
Senior Judge Ronald LongstaffH.W. Bush 11/5/1991 - 11/5/20062001 - 200611/5/2006 - PresentKansas State College, 1962University of Iowa College of Law, 1965
Senior Judge Harold VietorCarter 5/11/1979-12/29/19961985-199212/29/1996-PresentUniversity of Iowa, 1955University of Iowa College of Law, 1958


Senior judges by appointing political party

This graph displays the percent of senior judges by the party of the appointing president and does not reflect how a judge may rule on specific cases or their own political preferences.

pChart

Magistrate judges

JudgeActiveBachelorsLaw
Magistrate Judge Celeste Bremer1985 - Present
Magistrate judge Stephen B. Jackson, Jr.2/2015-PresentUniversity of Notre Dame, 1988University of Iowa, 1991
Magistrate Judge Helen C. Adams2/13/2014-PresentUniversity of Iowa, B.S., 1985University of Iowa, J.D., 1988


Jurisdiction

The Counties of the Southern District of Iowa (click for larger map)

The Southern District of Iowa has original jurisdiction over cases filed within its jurisdiction. These cases can include civil and criminal matters that fall under federal law.

There are three court divisions, each covering the following counties:

The Central Division, covering Adair, Adams, Appanoose, Boone, Clarke, Dallas, Davis, Decatur, Greene, Guthrie, Jasper, Jefferson, Keokuk, Lucas, Madison, Mahaska, Marion, Monroe, Polk, Poweshiek, Ringgold, Story, Taylor, Union, Wapello, Warren and Wayne counties

The Eastern Division, covering Clinton, Des Moines, Henry, Johnson, Lee, Louisa, Muscatine, Scott, Van Buren and Washington counties

The Western Division, covering Audubon, Cass, Fremont, Harrison, Mills, Montgomery, Page, Pottawattamie and Shelby counties

Caseloads

pChart

pChart

Federal Court Caseload Statistics*
YearStarting case load:Cases filed:Total cases:Cases terminated:Remaining cases:Median time(Criminal)**:Median time(Civil)**:3 Year Civil cases#:Vacant posts:## Trials/Post
2013 930131422441385 8599.29.024 (4.3%)040
2012 1007134523521427 9259.77.423 (4.1%)2.331
2011 1041144924901469 102110.29.620 (3.4%)030
2010 1166149526611614 104710.910.925 (3.9%)039
2009 1277132526021428 117412.510.424 (3.6%)064
2008 1399129626951390 130511.910.648 (6.2%)042
2007123314102643131013331110.341 (5.1%)450
*All statistics are taken from the Official Federal Courts' Website and reflect the calendar year through September.    **Time in months from filing to completion.
#This statistic includes cases which have been appealed in higher courts.    ##This is the total number of months that any judicial posts had spent vacant that year.

Notable cases

For a searchable list of opinions, please see Justia.com-Dockets and Filings-Southern District of Iowa.

History

The District of Iowa was established by Congress on March 3, 1845 with one post to cover the entire state. Since the District of Iowa was not yet assigned to a judicial circuit, it was granted the same jurisdiction as the United States circuit courts, excluding appeals and writs of error, which are the jurisdiction of the United States Supreme Court.

On July 15, 1862, Statute 12 Stat. 576 repealed the circuit court jurisdiction of the District of Iowa and instead established a United States circuit court in the district, and then assigned the district over to the Ninth Circuit. Statute 14 Stat. 209 on July 23, 1866, reorganized the circuits and assigned the District of Iowa to the Eighth Circuit.

The State of Iowa was divided into two circuits, the Northern and the Southern, on July 20, 1882 by statute 22 Stat. 172. One judgeship was assigned to each district. Over time two additional judicial posts were added for a total of three current posts.[5]

Judicial posts

The following table highlights the development of judicial posts for the Southern District of Iowa:[5]

Year Statute Total Seats
March 3, 1845 5 Stat. 789 1
July 20, 1882 22 Stat. 172 1
January 19, 1928 45 Stat. 52 2 (1 temporary)
May 19, 1961 75 Stat. 80 2 (1 temporary)
October 20, 1978 92 Stat. 1629 3 (1 temporary)
December 1, 1990 104 Stat. 5089 3 (1 temporary)

Former chief judges

In order to qualify for the office of chief judge in one of the federal courts, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as chief judge. A vacancy in the office of chief judge is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The chief judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position. Unlike the Chief Justice of the United States, a chief judge returns to active service after the expiration of his or her term and does not create a vacancy on the bench by the fact of his or her promotion.[6][7]

Former judges

For more information about the judges of the Southern District of Iowa, see former federal judges of the Southern District of Iowa.

Federal courthouse

Five separate courthouses serve the Southern District of Iowa.

See also

External links

References


IowaIowa Supreme CourtIowa Court of AppealsIowa district courtsUnited States District Court for the Northern District of IowaUnited States District Court for the Southern District of IowaUnited States bankruptcy court, Northern District of IowaUnited States bankruptcy court, Southern District of IowaUnited States Court of Appeals for the Eighth CircuitIowa countiesIowa judicial newsIowa judicial electionsJudicial selection in IowaIowaTemplate.jpg