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United States House of Representatives elections in Arkansas, 2012

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2012 U.S. House Elections in Arkansas

Primary Date
May 22, 2012

Partisan breakdownCandidates

Arkansas District Pages
District 1District 2District 3District 4

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2012 U.S. Senate Elections

744px-Flag of Arkansas.svg.png
The 2012 U.S. House of Representatives elections in Arkansas took place on November 6, 2012. Voters elected four candidates to serve in the U.S. House, one from each of the state's four congressional districts.
Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
March 1, 2012
May 22, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Arkansas has an open primary system, in which registered voters do not have to be members of a party to vote in that party's primary.

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by April 23. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 8.[1]

See also: Arkansas elections, 2012


The Center for Voting and Democracy (Fairvote) projected that Democrats would win 0 districts while Republicans would win all four seats.[2]

Primary competitiveness

See also: National contested primary average during the 2012 U.S. congressional elections

Arkansas was tied with Iowa for having the 36th most competitive congressional primaries in 2012, with 37.5% of major party primaries having been contested (3 out of 8). The national average was 54.31%.

Three U.S. House incumbents sought re-election in Arkansas in 2012. None of the three (0%) faced a primary challenger. Nationwide, 200 out of the 386 incumbents seeking re-election faced a primary challenger (51.81%).

Partisan breakdown

Heading into the November 6 election, the Republican Party held three of the four Congressional seats from Arkansas.

Members of the U.S. House from Arkansas -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 1 0
     Republican Party 3 4
Total 4 4

Incumbents

Heading into the 2012 election, the incumbents for the four congressional districts were:

Name Party District
Mike Ross Electiondot.png Democratic 4
Rick Crawford Ends.png Republican 1
Steve Womack Ends.png Republican 3
Tim Griffin Ends.png Republican 2

Margin of victory for winners

There were a total of 4 seats up for election in 2012 in Arkansas. The following table shows the margin of victory for each district winner, which is calculated by examining the percentage difference between the top-two vote getters. If the race was uncontested, the margin of victory is listed as 100%.

District Winner Margin of Victory Total Vote Top Opponent
Arkansas, District 1 Republican Party Rick Crawford 17.1% 246,843 Scott Ellington
Arkansas, District 2 Republican Party Tim Griffin 15.7% 286,598 Herb Rule
Arkansas, District 3 Republican Party Steve Womack 59.9% 245,660 Rebekah Kennedy
Arkansas, District 4 Republican Party Tom Cotton 22.8% 258,953 Gene Jeffress

General election candidates

District General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
1st Democratic Party Scott Ellington
Republican Party Rick Crawford
Green Party Jacob Holloway
Libertarian Party Jessica Paxton
Rick Crawford Republican Party Rick Crawford No
2nd Democratic PartyHerb Rule
Republican Party Tim Griffin
Green Party Barbara Ward
Libertarian Party Chris Hayes
Tim Griffin Republican Party Tim Griffin No
3rd Republican Party Steve Womack
Green Party Rebekah Kennedy
Libertarian Party David Pangrac
Steve Womack Republican Party Steve Womack No
4th Democratic Party Gene Jeffress
Republican Party Tom Cotton
Green Party Joshua Drake
Libertarian Party Bobby Tullis
Mike Ross Republican Party Tom Cotton Yes

Candidates

1st Congressional District

General election candidates

Democratic Party Scott Ellington
Republican Party Rick Crawford Green check mark transparent.png
Green Party Jacob Holloway
Libertarian Party Jessica Paxton

June 12, 2012, Democratic primary runoff


May 22, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

2nd Congressional District

General election candidates

Democratic Party Herb Rule
Republican Party Tim Griffin Green check mark transparent.png
Green Party Barbara Ward
Libertarian Party Chris Hayes


May 22, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

3rd Congressional District

General election candidates

Republican Party Steve Womack Green check mark transparent.png
Green Party Rebekah Kennedy
Libertarian Party David Pangrac
Note: Democratic Party Ken Aden withdrew from the race.


May 22, 2012, primary results
Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary

4th Congressional District

General election candidates

Democratic Party Gene Jeffress
Republican Party Tom Cotton Green check mark transparent.png
Green Party Joshua Drake
Libertarian Party Bobby Tullis

June 12, 2012, Democratic primary runoff


May 22, 2012, primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Republican Party Republican Primary


Impact of redistricting

Congressman Mike Ross said that redistricting was responsible for making Congress become more partisan by creating fewer competitive districts. He said that the process has created more safe seats for both parties, resulting in fewer moderate lawmakers willing to work with the opposite party. Ross is co-sponsoring legislation which would require states to redraw boundaries by using an independent commission. Ross, the only Democratic Arkansas congressman, did not seek re-election in 2012. He said, "It used to be that we only did politics on even years and we'd actually make policy on odd years. Now we never make policy. It's politics 24-7 the entire two year term."[11]

See also

References