United States Senate special election in South Carolina, 2014

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Special Elections to the 113th Session of Congress, 2013-2014

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2014 Congressional Elections2014 U.S. Senate Elections
2014 U.S. House Elections
U.S. Senate, South Carolina Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Scott Incumbent 61.1% 757,215
     Democratic Joyce Dickerson 37.1% 459,583
     American Party of South Carolina Jill Bossi 1.7% 21,652
     N/A Write-in 0% 532
Total Votes 1,238,982
Source: South Carolina State Election Commission


South Carolina held a special election for the U.S. Senate on November 4, 2014, for a two-year term. On December 17, 2012, The Associated Press revealed that Tim Scott had been chosen by Gov. Nikki Haley to temporarily take over for Sen. Jim DeMint (R) after he vacated his Senate seat to become president of the Heritage Foundation in January 2013.[1] The special election was held to fill the remaining two years of Demint's term. A six-year term was also up for election for the seat held by Lindsey Graham (R).

Tim Scott defeated Richland County Councilwoman Joyce Dickerson and Jill Bossi, an American Party of South Carolina candidate, in the general election. After winning the election Scott said he was “thankful for the evolution that's occurred in South Carolina, where we are a state where we've seen more progress made ... than perhaps any other state in the nation.”[2]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
March 30, 2014
June 10, 2014
November 4, 2014

Primary: South Carolina is one of 14 states that uses an open primary system, in which registered voters do not have to be members of a party to vote in that party's primary.[3][4][5]

Voter registration: To vote in the primary, voters had to register by May 10, 2014. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 4, 2014.[6]

See also: South Carolina elections, 2014

Incumbent: The special election was held to fill the remaining two years of Jim DeMint's term.

Candidates

General election candidates


June 10, 2014, primary results

Republican Party Republican Primary

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Independent Third Party Candidates


Failed to file

Withdrew

Declined to run


Election results

General election

U.S. Senate, South Carolina Special Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTim Scott Incumbent 61.1% 757,215
     Democratic Joyce Dickerson 37.1% 459,583
     American Party of South Carolina Jill Bossi 1.7% 21,652
     N/A Write-in 0% 532
Total Votes 1,238,982
Source: South Carolina State Election Commission

Republican primary

Tim Scott easily defeated Randall Young in the Republican primary on June 10, 2014.[7]

U.S. Senate, South Carolina Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngTim Scott 90% 275,018
Randall Young 10% 30,646
Total Votes 305,664
Source: Results via Associated Press

Democratic primary

Richland County Councilwoman Joyce Dickerson defeated former York County Councilman Sidney Moore and Harry Pavilack in the Democratic primary.[7]

U.S. Senate, South Carolina Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJoyce Dickerson 65.4% 72,547
Sidney Moore 23.6% 26,191
Harry Pavilack 11% 12,214
Total Votes 110,952
Source: Results via Associated Press

Race background

In January 2013, Sen. DeMint resigned to head the Heritage Foundation.[8] Governor Haley appointed Tim Scott to serve the first two years of DeMint's term, and on November 4, 2014, the voters of South Carolina will elect a candidate for the remaining two years.[20]

Tim Scott became the first black senator from the South since Reconstruction.[1]

Key votes

Below are important votes that Scott cast during the 113th Congress.

Economy

Farm bill

Nay3.png On February 4, 2014, the Democratic controlled Senate approved the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, H.R. 2642, also known as the Farm Bill.[21] It passed the Senate with a vote of 68-32. The nearly 1,000-page bill reformed and continued various programs of the Department of Agriculture through 2018. The $1 trillion bill expanded crop insurance for farmers by $7 billion over the next decade and created new subsidies for rice and peanut growers that will kick in when prices drop; however, cuts to the food stamp program cut an average of $90 per month for 1.7 million people in 15 states.[22] Scott voted with 22 other Republican senators against the bill.

2014 Budget

Nay3.png On January 16, 2014, the Democratic-controlled Senate approved H.R. 3547, a $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September 30, 2014.[23][24] The Senate voted 72-26 for the 1,582 page bill, with 17 Republicans and 55 Democrats voting in favor of the bill.[24] The omnibus package included 12 annual spending bills to fund federal operations.[25] It included a 1 percent increase in the paychecks of federal workers and military personnel, a $1 billion increase in Head Start funding for early childhood education, reduced funding to the Internal Revenue Service and the Environmental Protection Agency and left the Affordable Care Act without any drastic cuts. Scott voted with 25 other Republican members against the bill.[23][24]

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Nay3.png During the shutdown in October 2013, the Senate rejected, down party lines, every House-originated bill that stripped the budget of funding for the Affordable Care Act. A deal was reached late on October 16, 2013, just hours before the debt ceiling deadline. The bill to reopen the government, H.R. 2775, lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[26] The final vote on H.R. 2775 was 81-18, with all 18 votes against the bill from Republican members. Scott voted with the Republican Party against the bill.[27]

Polls

General Election
Poll Tim Scott Joyce DickersonJill BossiMargin of ErrorSample Size
The Winthrop Poll
September 21-28, 2014
52.4%31.8%1.8%+/-31,082
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org
General Election
Poll Tim Scott Joyce DickersonMargin of ErrorSample Size
YouGov
September 20 - October 1, 2014
54%31%+/-22,663
YouGov
August 18 - September 2, 2014
52%31%+/-5833
AVERAGES 53% 31% +/-3.5 1,748
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org
General Election
Poll Tim Scott Joyce DickersonOtherUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Rasmussen Reports
July 9-10, 2014
53%31%6%11%+/-4750
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Endorsements

Tim Scott

Jill Bossi

  • Bossi was endorsed by the Centrist Project.[29]

Campaign contributions

Tim Scott

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Scott's reports.[30]

Tim Scott (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
April Quarterly[31]April 15, 2013$54,782.42$1,466,538.46$(161,436.46)$1,359,884.42
July Quarterly[32]July 15, 2013$1,359,884.42$1,272,979.20$(253,654.69)$2,379,208.93
October Quarterly[33]October 15, 2013$2,379,208.93$762,099.18$(267,947.10)$2,873,361.01
Year-End[34]April 23, 2014$2,873,361.01$433,470.68$(213,930.03)$3,092,901.66
April Quarterly[35]March 31, 2014$3,092,901.66$965,960.63$(314,278.81)$3,744,582.48
July Quarterly[36]July 14, 2014$3,896,693.74$448,781.60$(676,147.36)$3,669,327.98
Running totals
$5,349,829.75$(1,887,394.45)

Joyce Dickerson

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Dickerson's reports.[37]

Joyce Dickerson (2014) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
Year-End Report[38]January 30, 2014$9,500.00$15,390.00$(10,725.00)$4,664.18
April Quarterly[39]April 14, 2014$4,664.18$12,784.00$(13,391.00)$4,057.15
Pre-Primary[40]May 27, 2014$7,537.15$9,735.00$(11,426.80)$5,845.35
July Quarterly[41]July 9, 2014$5,845.35$13,945.00$(16,817.80)$2,872.55
Running totals
$51,854$(52,360.6)

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 USA Today, "South Carolina to get first black senator in Tim Scott," December 17, 2012
  2. The State, "Scott makes history: SC elects first African American to Senate," accessed November 10, 2014
  3. National Conference of State Legislatures Website, "State Primary Election Types," accessed January 6, 2014
  4. Fair Vote, "Congressional and Presidential Primaries: Open, Closed, Semi-Closed, and 'Top Two,'" accessed January 6, 2014
  5. Ballotpedia research conducted December 26, 2013, through January 3, 2014, researching and analyzing various state websites and codes.
  6. South Carolina State Election Commission, "South Carolina Voter Registration Information," accessed January 3, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Associated Press, "South Carolina - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 10, 2014
  8. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named wp
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 Roll Call, "Appointment Speculation Centers on Rep. Tim Scott," December 6, 2012
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.6 Politico, "All eyes on Nikki Haley to pick Jim DeMint successor," December 7, 2012
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 National Journal, "DeMint Resignation Sets Off South Carolina Scramble," December 6, 2012
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 CNN.com, "First on CNN: Haley finalizes short list for DeMint seat," December 11, 2012
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 SC Votes, "Senate Candidate List," accessed March 31, 2014
  14. Green Papers, "SC," accessed January 24, 2014
  15. Bossi for Senate, "Home," accessed May 29, 2014
  16. SCVotes.gov, "Candidate Listing for the 11/4/2014 Statewide General Election," accessed September 15, 2014
  17. Campaign website, "Home," accessed January 13, 2014
  18. The State, "ELECTION 2014: Rick Wade drops out of U.S. Senate race," March 6, 2014
  19. Island Packet, "Patrick, Lotz mulling run for Scott's U.S. House seat," December 17, 2012
  20. Roll Call, "Appointment Speculation Centers on Rep. Tim Scott," December 6, 2012
  21. Senate.gov, "H.R. 2642 (Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013)," accessed February 12, 2014
  22. New York Times, "Senate Passes Long-Stalled Farm Bill, With Clear Winners and Losers," accessed February 12, 2014
  23. 23.0 23.1 Politico, "Senate approves $1.1 trillion spending bill," accessed January 20, 2014
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 U.S. Senate, "January 16 Vote," accessed January 20, 2014
  25. Roll Call, "House Passes $1.1 Trillion Omnibus," accessed January 20, 2014
  26. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  27. Senate.gov, "H.R. 2775 As Amended," accessed October 31, 2013
  28. Politico, "FreedomWorks backs Ted Yoho, Tim Scott, Mark Sanford," accessed March 19, 2014
  29. Centrist Project, "Featured Candidates," accessed July 9. 2014
  30. Federal Election Commission, "Scott 2014 Summary reports," accessed August 1, 2013
  31. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed August 1, 2013
  32. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed August 1, 2013
  33. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed October 30, 2013
  34. Federal Election Commission, "Year-End," accessed May 13, 2014
  35. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed May 13, 2014
  36. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed October 22, 2014
  37. Federal Election Commission, "Dickerson 2014 Summary reports," accessed April 29, 2014
  38. Federal Election Commission, "Year End Report," accessed April 29, 2014
  39. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed April 29, 2014
  40. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-Primary," accessed June 18, 2014
  41. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed July 31, 2014