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Utah Executive Officers Succession, Amendment A (2008)

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The Utah Executive Officers Succession, Amendment A appeared on the November 4, 2008 ballot in Utah. It was one of five proposed constitutional amendments to the Utah Constitution that were legislatively-referred to the ballot by the Utah State Legislature.

Election results

See also 2008 ballot measure election results

These results are based on the Elections Division of Utah.[1]

Utah Amendment A (2008)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 613,744 75.86%
No195,31224.14%

Specific Provisions

The amendment enacted the following provisions:

  • Provides that the Lieutenant Governor becomes Governor upon a vacancy in the office of Governor.
  • Provides that the President of the Senate becomes Governor upon simultaneous vacancies in the offices of Governor and Lieutenant Governor.
  • Provides that the Speaker of the House of Representatives becomes Governor upon simultaneous vacancies in the offices of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and President of the Senate.
  • Provides what constitutes a vacancy in the offices of Governor and Lieutenant Governor.
  • Provides for succession to the duties of the office of Governor during a temporary disability of the Governor.
  • Modifies provisions relating to determining the disability of the Governor or person acting as Governor.
  • Modifies the process for appointing a person to fill a vacancy in the office of Lieutenant Governor by requiring the consent of the Senate; and
  • Provides a process for determining the disability of the Lieutenant Governor.

Supporters

The chief sponsor of the measure in the Utah assembly was Stephen Urquhart. The senate sponsor was John Hickman.

Arguments in Support

Arguments made in support of the measure included:

  • Although rarely used, problems with the reading of this part of the constitution created havoc in 2003 when then Lt. Gov. Olene Walker took over for Gov. Mike Leavitt following his confirmation as head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would clear up the language to avoid future complications.[2]

Opposition

None yet identified.

See also

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External links

References