Washington Public Necessity and Convenience Certificate for Utilities, Referendum 7 (1916)

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The Washington Public Necessity and Convenience Certificate for Utilities, also known as Referendum 7, was on the November 7, 1916 ballot in Washington as a veto referendum, where it was defeated, thus overturning the legislation. The measure would have required proposed utility services, private or municipal, that serve the public to seek certification from a commission which would grant certificates based on the public necessity and convenience of such service.[1]

Election results

Washington Referendum 7 (1916)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No201,74281.13%
Yes 46,820 18.87%

Election results via: Washington Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

An act amending chapter 117, Session Laws of 1911, being an act entitled: 'An act relating to public service properties and utilities, providing for the regulation of the same, fixing penalties for the violation thereof, making appropriation and repealing certain acts,' by adding an additional section thereto, to be know as Section 74A.[2]

Path to the ballot

Referendum 7 was filed on March 25, 1915. Signatures were submitted to qualify it for the ballot. The measure was placed on the ballot as provided for by the state constitution.[3]

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Office of the Secretary of State, "1916 Voters Pamphlet," accessed September 19, 2013
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  3. Washington Secretary of State, "History of Referendum Measures," accessed September 19, 2013