Washington Daylight Savings Time, Initiative 210 (1960)

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The Washington Daylight Savings Time Initiative, also known as Initiative 210, was on the November 8, 1960 ballot in Washington as an Initiative to the People, where it was approved. The measure established a state-wide daylight savings time from the last Sunday of April to the last Sunday of September.[1]

Election results

Washington Initiative 210 (1960)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 596,135 51.71%
No556,62348.29%

Election results via: Washington Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

AN ACT Providing that at two o'clock antemeridian Pacific Standard Time of the last Sunday in April each year the time of the State of Washington shall be advanced one hour, and at two o'clock antemeridian Pacific Standard Time of the last Sunday in September in each year the time of the State of Washington shall, by the retarding of one hour, be returned to Pacific Standard Time.[2]

Support

Arguments

The following reasons were given in support of Initiative 210 in the Washington 1960 Voters' Guide:[3]

ADD AN EXTRA HOUR OF DAYLIGHT TO THE ACTIVE PART OF YOUR DAY

JUST THINK OF THE ADVANTAGES of an extra hour of daylight at the active end of your day. Enjoy the gracious outdoor living offered by our wonderful State - swimming, boating, fishing, golf, after-work picnics, or perhaps a relaxing ride with the family really seeing our wondrous scenery. Dad will even have extra time to play or enjoy outdoor hobbies with the children, or get EXTRA yard work done. Just think, 154 more hours of daylight each year (an extra two-week vacation) with daylight saving time.

WASHINGTON STATE, AND YOU, WILL BENEFIT by a general increase in business. An extra hour of sun is an extra hour of fun for the tourist, and this means more tourist dollars for MOST communities. AND, our State, without daylight saving time, is limited to only four hours to do business with New York and the East, and this affects ALL business in the long run. Let's get in step with the rest of the nation. California and British Columbia have daylight saving, and Oregon is voting to adopt it this election.[2]

The arguments in favor of Initiative 210 were prepared by:[1]

  • Max D. Crittenden, State Chairman, Jaycees for Uniform Time Committee
  • Robert A. Stewart, Co-Chairman, Jaycees for Uniform Time Committee
  • Roger Schramm

Opposition

Arguments

The following reasons were given in opposition to Initiative 210 in the Washington 1960 Voters' Guide:[3]

DON'T BE MISLED ONLY 14 STATES HAVE STATEWIDE DAYLIGHT SAVING

A FEW CITIES IN 12 OTHER STATES ON LOCAL OPTION!

PLAIN TRUTHS

1. Farming, logging and many other industries would suffer heavy financial lost under Daylight Savings. DO NOT jeopardize jobs in Washington.

2. Children do not get their proper rest under Daylight Saving Time.

3. Seattle has 13 minutes more evening daylight under STANDARD TIME than Los Angeles has on DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME. What more do we need?

4. The State of Washington, in the past five years, has had a record increase in tourists - 20% since 1955 - with Standard Time. Tourists are not interested in time, their time is their own.

5. Washington voters have twice rejected Daylight Saving Time, in 1952 and 1954, by decisive margins. Don't let "The Playboys" wreck the economy of your State . . . VOTE NO on Daylight Saving Time.[2]

The arguments against Initiative 210 were prepared by:[1]

  • Leonard Zink, Washington State Dairyman's Federation
  • A. Lars Nelson, Master, Washington State Grange
  • Ed Heineman, Washington Horse Breeder's Association

Path to the ballot

Initiative 210 was filed on April 15, 1960. Signatures were submitted to qualify it for the ballot. The measure was placed on the ballot as provided for by the state constitution.[4]

Similar measures

See also

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Office of the Secretary of State, "1960 Voters Pamphlet," accessed September 9, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  3. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named votersguide
  4. Washington Secretary of State, "Initiatives to the People," accessed September 9, 2013