Washington Designation of Controlled Substances Initiative (2014)

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A Washington Designation of Controlled Substances Initiative is not on the November 4, 2014 ballot in Washington as an Initiative to the People. The measure would have modified the designation of non-manufactured substances as "controlled substances." It would also have redefined marijuana, for the purposes of state law, to include processed marijuana or its resin. Some versions included provisions to allow for providing minors with certain controlled substances, such as tobacco. As of June 5, 2014, multiple versions of such an initiative were active according to the Washington Secretary of State. The following section provides the ballot titles and measure summaries for five such measures sponsored by Jared Allaway. None of the measures submitted signatures by the prescribed deadline, thereby failing to make the ballot.[1]

Text of measure

Initiative 1339

Ballot title

The official ballot title read as follows:[1]

Initiative Measure No. 1339 concerns controlled substances under state law.

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances are designated “controlled substances” and exclude certain unprocessed vegetable matter; redefine marijuana to exclude resin or processed marijuana; and change criminal laws regarding tobacco and minors.

Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ][2]

Ballot measure summary

The official ballot summary read as follows:[1]

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances are designated “controlled substances.” Certain unprocessed vegetable matter could not be a controlled substance. Substances with an accepted medical use in any state could not be designated under Schedule I. “Marijuana” would be redefined to exclude resin or processed marijuana. The measure would limit reliance on federal designations, without changing federal law; it would repeal a statute making it a crime to provide certain tobacco products to minors.[2]

Initiative 1340

Ballot title

The official ballot title read as follows:[1]

Initiative Measure No. 1340 concerns controlled substances under state law.

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances are designated “controlled substances” and exclude certain unprocessed vegetable matter; redefine marijuana to exclude processed marijuana or its resin; and change certain related criminal laws.

Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ][2]

Ballot measure summary

The official ballot summary read as follows:[1]

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances can be designated “controlled substances.” Certain unprocessed vegetable matter could not be designated, but processed tobacco could. Substances with an accepted medical use in any state could not be designated under Schedule I. “Marijuana” would be redefined to exclude resin or processed marijuana. Some substances would no longer be narcotics, affecting criminal penalties. Parents or guardians could provide certain controlled substances to their minor children without criminal penalty.[2]

Initiative 1345

Ballot title

The official ballot title read as follows:[1]

Initiative Measure No. 1345 concerns controlled substances under state law.

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances are designated “controlled substances” and exclude certain unprocessed vegetable matter; redefine marijuana to exclude processed marijuana or its resin; and change certain related criminal laws.

Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ][2]

Ballot measure summary

The official ballot summary read as follows:[1]

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances can be designated “controlled substances.” Certain unprocessed vegetable matter could not be designated, but processed tobacco could. Substances with an accepted medical use in any state could not be designated under Schedule I. “Marijuana” would be redefined to exclude resin or processed marijuana. Some substances would no longer be narcotics, affecting criminal penalties. Parents or guardians could provide certain controlled substances to their minor children without criminal penalty.[2]

Initiative 1346

Ballot title

The official ballot title read as follows:[1]

Initiative Measure No. 1346 concerns controlled substances under state law.

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances are designated “controlled substances” and exclude certain unprocessed vegetable matter; redefine marijuana to exclude processed marijuana or its resin; and change certain related criminal laws.

Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ][2]

Ballot measure summary

The official ballot summary read as follows:[1]

This measure would limit how non-manufactured substances can be designated “controlled substances.” Certain unprocessed vegetable matter could not be designated, but processed tobacco could. Substances with an accepted medical use in any state could not be designated under Schedule I. “Marijuana” would be redefined to exclude resin or processed marijuana. Some substances would no longer be narcotics, affecting criminal penalties. Parents or guardians could provide certain controlled substances to their minor children without criminal penalty.[2]

Initiative 1352

Ballot title

The official ballot title read as follows:[1]

Initiative Measure No. 1352 concerns marijuana (cannabis).

This measure would exempt certain marijuana-related activities from taxes, fees, and licenses, decriminalize certain marijuana offenses, eliminate marijuana blood concentration limits for medical marijuana patients, and authorize vacation of past marijuana convictions.

Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ][2]

Ballot measure summary

The official ballot summary read as follows:[1]

This measure would exempt certain cultivation, possession, and transfers of marijuana from taxes, fees, or licenses. Illegal possession of less than 40 grams of marijuana would be a civil infraction as would first-time offenses for persons under twenty-one if the conduct is legal for persons over twenty-one. THC blood limits for driving while intoxicated would not apply to medical marijuana patients, past convictions could be vacated, and parents or guardians could provide marijuana to minors.[2]

Support

All five of the initiatives concerning the controlled substances act were sponsored by Jared Allway, an Initiative Sponsor at Real Legalization. He also sponsored another initiative with the subject "concerns marijuana," which expired on March 19, 2014.[1]

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing the initiative process in Washington

Supporters were required to collect at least 246,372 valid signatures by July 3, 2014 in order to land the initiative on the ballot. No signatures were submitted by the prescribed deadline.[1]

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 Washington Secretary of State, "Proposed Initiatives to the People - 2014," accessed June 7, 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.