Washington Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Tax, Initiatives 97 and 97B (1988)

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The Washington Hazardous Waste Clean-Up Tax, also known as Initiative Measure 97 and Alternative Measure 97B, were on the November 8, 1988 ballot in Washington as an Initiative to the Legislature, where Initiative 97 was approved and Alternative Measure 97B was defeated. Measure 97 imposed a 0.7% tax on the wholesale value of hazardous substances for hazardous waste cleanup programs. The defeated Alternative Measure 97B would have imposed a 0.8% tax on the wholesale value of hazardous substances for hazardous waste cleanup programs, but would have excluded taxation on more hazardous substances.[1]

Election results

See also: Washington State Constitution, Section 1 of Article II for how the law deals with competing measures.
Washington Initiatives 97 and 97B (1988)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda For Either 1,307,638 42.60%
Defeatedd Against Both 224,286 7.31%
Washington Initiatives 97 and 97B (1988)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda 97 860,835 28.05%
Defeatedd 97B 676,469 22.04%

Election results via: Washington Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot regarding the competing measures:[1]

VOTERS PLEASE NOTE: The state Constitution establishes a TWO-STEP process to express your preference on these issues.[2]

The language that appeared on the ballot for Initiative Measure 97 :[1]

Shall a hazardous waste cleanup program, partially funded by a 7/10 of 1% tax on hazardous substances, be enacted?[2]

The language that appeared on the ballot for Alternative Measure 97B:[1]

Shall the legislature's cleanup program, with 0.8% hazardous substance tax raising less money, with less overage of petroleum, be retained?[2]

Path to the ballot

Sponsor Christine Platt of Olympia filed 215,505 signatures for the initiative on August 13, 1987. The measure was certified to the legislature on February 8, 1988. The legislature passed Alternative Measure 97B rather than Platt's Measure 97. As required by the state constitution, both measures were placed on the ballot as competing measures.[3]

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Office of the Secretary of State, "1988 Voters Pamphlet," accessed August 16, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  3. Washington Secretary of State, "Initiatives to the Legislature," accessed August 16, 2013