Washington Litter Control Act, Initiatives 40 and 40B (1972)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on the Environment
Environment.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Ballot measures
in Washington State
Seal of Washington.jpg
Constitutional amendments
Initiatives to the People
Initiatives to the Legislature
Statutes referred by Legislature
Veto referendums
Political topics on the ballot
LawsHistoryConstitution

The Washington Litter Control Act, also known as Initiative Measure 40 and Alternative Measure 40B, were on the November 7, 1972 ballot in Washington as an Initiative to the Legislature, where Initiative 40 was defeated and Alternative Measure 97B was approved. Alternative Measure 40B established an anti-litter program in the state. The defeated Measure 40 would have established an anti-litter program and an "ecology patrol" in the state.[1]

Election results

See also: Washington State Constitution, Section 1 of Article II for how the law deals with competing measures.
Washington Initiatives 40 and 40B (1972)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda For Either 788,151 65.30%
Defeatedd Against Both 418,764 34.70%
Washington Initiatives 40 and 40B (1972)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd 40 194,128 19.55%
Approveda 40B 798,931 80.45%

Election results via: Washington Secretary of State

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot regarding the competing measures:[1]

NOTE: Voter entitled to mark preference even though voting against both (to indicate which measure is the lesser objectionable). Preference vote will have no significance unless the majority of the voters mark their ballots as "FOR EITHER."[2]

The language that appeared on the ballot for Initiative Measure 40 :[1]

An ACT regulating litter disposal; directing the Department of Ecology to administer its provisions and to promulgate necessary rules and regulations; establishing an ecology patrol with powers of enforcement; providing penalties and fines for littering; stating that littering from a moving vehicle is a moving violation; requiring litter receptacles marked with antilitter symbols or logos to be placed in designated public places; and providing that administration of the act shall be financed in substantial part by assessments levied against manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers of goods, containers or wrappers which are reasonably related to the litter problem.[2]

The language that appeared on the ballot for Alternative Measure 40B:[1]

An ACT regulating litter disposal; directing the Department of Ecology to administer its provisions and to promulgate necessary regulations; authorizing the Director to designate departmental employees to enforce the act in addition to other law enforcement officers; providing penalties and fines for littering; requiring litter receptacles marked with anti-litter symbols to be placed in designated public places; establishing a litter control account in the general fund; and providing that administration of the act shall be financed in substantial part by assessments levied against manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers of goods, containers or wrappers which are reasonably related to the litter problem.[2]

Path to the ballot

Sponsor Irving B. Stimpson of the Washington Committee to Stop Litter filed 141,228 signatures for the initiative on August 20, 1970. The measure was certified to the legislature on January 29, 1971. The legislature passed Alternative Measure 40B rather than Stimpson's Measure 40. As required by the state constitution, both measures were placed on the ballot as competing measures.[3]

See also

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Office of the Secretary of State, "1972 Voters Pamphlet," accessed August 23, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  3. Washington Secretary of State, "Initiatives to the Legislature," accessed August 23, 2013