Wyoming Nonresidential Trustees Amendment, Constitutional Amendment A (2014)

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Nonresidential Trustees Amendment
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Type:Constitutional amendment
Constitution:Article 7, Section 17
Referred by:Wyoming State Legislature
Topic:Admin of gov't
Status:Defeated Defeatedd

The Wyoming Nonresidential Trustees, Constitutional Amendment A was on the November 4, 2014 ballot in the state of Wyoming as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have allowed the governor to appoint non-Wyoming citizens to serve as University of Wyoming trustees. Only 20 percent of the trustee positions, however, would have been allowed to be filled by out-of-state citizens.[1]

The amendment was sponsored in the Wyoming Legislature by Senate President Tony Ross (R-4) as Senate Joint Resolution 1.[2]

In Wyoming, an amendment requires a majority approval of all those voting in the general election. Therefore, a non-vote on the amendment essentially counts as a no vote.

Election results

Wyoming Constitutional Amendment A
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No114,59770.49%
Yes 47,979 29.51%
Total vote171,153

Election results via: Wyoming Secretary of State

Text of measure

Ballot title

The official ballot text appeared as follows:[1]

The adoption of this amendment would allow the governor to appoint nonresidents of the state to serve as University of Wyoming trustees. Not more than twenty percent (20%) of the appointed trustees may be nonresidents of the state. The governor would not be required to appoint any nonresident as a trustee. All appointments to the board of trustees are with the advice and consent of the Wyoming Senate.[3]

Constitutional changes

See also: Article 7, Wyoming Constitution

Amendment A would have amended Section 17 of Article 7 of the Constitution of Wyoming to read:[1]

The legislature shall provide by law for the management of the university, its lands and other property by a board of trustees, consisting of not less than seven members, to be appointed by the governor by and with the advice and consent of the senate, and the president of the university, and the superintendent of public instruction, as members ex officio, as such having the right to speak, but not to vote. The duties and powers of the trustees shall be prescribed by law. Not more than twenty percent (20%) of the appointed trustees may be nonresidents of the state, notwithstanding the provisions of Article 6, Section 15 of this Constitution.

Support

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The amendment was introduced into the Wyoming Legislature by Senate President Tony Ross (R-4).

Supporters

Officials

  • Dave Palmerlee, President of the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees[4]

Senate

The following state senators voted to place the measure on the ballot:[2]

Note: A yes vote on the measure merely referred the question to voters and did not necessarily mean these legislators approved of the stipulations laid out in Amendment A.
House

Senate

The following state representatives voted to place the measure on the ballot:[2]

Note: A yes vote on the measure merely referred the question to voters and did not necessarily mean these legislators approved of the stipulations laid out in Amendment A.

Arguments

  • Rep. Kermit Brown (R-14) said, "The primary thinking behind that was our UW graduates are all over the world. But there are some people out there who could bring tremendous contributions to the board of trustees. We think there's a lot of talent there, and it's really a mistake and a waste not to let them (serve)." According to the UW Alumni Association, 48,000 alumni live in Wyoming, and 70,000 live outside Wyoming.[4]

Opposition

Opponents

Officials

Senate

The following state senators voted against placing the issue on the ballot.[2]

House

The following state representatives voted against placing the issue on the ballot.[2]

Media editorial positions

2014 measures
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November 4
Amendment A Defeatedd
Endorsements
See also: Endorsements of Wyoming ballot measures, 2014

Support

  • Casper Star-Tribune said, "Being a working, dedicated trustee from outside the state would obviously take a special commitment from a UW graduate who lives elsewhere, who would have to take on the extra workload in addition to their regular job. But we believe there are people with special ties to UW who would be valuable resources to the university if they are given the chance to serve as trustees. We hope Ross’ bill passes and gives Wyoming an opportunity to take advantage of their expertise."[5]
  • Laramie Boomerang said, "One advantage to broadening the pool of potential trustee candidates is that it would serve to strengthen the overall competitiveness of UW graduates. These young men and women will be competing globally for professional advancement and growth. Anything that broadens the expertise on the board of trustees will increase the stature and respect for the university nationwide, and that can only add to the value of a diploma from UW."[6]

Path to the ballot

See also: Amending the Wyoming Constitution

A two-thirds vote in both chambers of the Wyoming State Legislature was required to refer the amendment to the ballot. SJR 1 was approved by the Wyoming Senate on January 30, 2013. The amendment was approved by the Wyoming House of Representatives on February 11, 2013.[2]

Senate vote

January 30, 2013 Senate vote

Wyoming SF 38 Senate Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 25 83.33%
No516.67%

House vote

February 11, 2013 House vote

Wyoming SF 38 House Vote
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 39 67.24%
No1932.76%

See also

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Suggest a link

External links

Additional reading

References