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Alabama's 1st Congressional District elections, 2012

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Alabama's 1st Congressional District

General Election Date
November 6, 2012

Primary Date
March 13, 2012

November 6 Election Winner:
Jo Bonner Republican Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Jo Bonner Republican Party
Jo Bonner.jpg

Alabama U.S. House Elections
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7

2012 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of Alabama.png
The 1st Congressional District of Alabama held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012.
This is the 1st Congressional District prior to the 2010 redistricting.

Jo Bonner won re-election.[1]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
January 12, 2012
March 13, 2012
November 6, 2012

Primary: Alabama has an open primary system, in which registered voters do not have to be members of a party to vote in that party's primary.

Voter registration: Voters had to register to vote in the primary by March 3. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 28.[2]

See also: Alabama elections, 2012

Incumbent: Heading into the election the incumbent was Jo Bonner (R), who was first elected in 2002.

This was the first election which used new district maps based on 2010 Census data. The 1st District is located in southwestern Alabama and includes Mobile, Baldwin, Escambia, Monroe, Washington counties and part of Clarke county.[3]

Candidates

General election candidates

Republican Party Jo BonnerGreen check mark transparent.png


March 13, 2012 primary results

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

No candidates ran.

Republican Party Republican Primary

Election results

General Election

U.S. House, Alabama District 1 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJo Bonner Incumbent 97.9% 196,374
     Write-In N/A 2.1% 4,302
Total Votes 200,676
Source: Alabama Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Republican Primary

U.S. House, Alabama District 1 Republican Primary Republican Primary, 2012
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJo Bonner Incumbent 55.6% 48,481
Dean Young 24.3% 21,216
Pete Riehm 15.7% 13,744
Peter Gounares 4.4% 3,828
Total Votes 87,269

Impact of redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Alabama

District partisanship

FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

See also: FairVote's Monopoly Politics 2012

In 2012, FairVote did a study on partisanship in the congressional districts, giving each a percentage ranking (D/R) based on the new 2012 maps and comparing that to the old 2010 maps. Alabama's 1st District was projected as Safe Republican in 2012.[7]

  • 2012: 35D / 65R
  • 2010: 35D / 65R

Cook Political Report's PVI

See also: Cook Political Report's Partisan Voter Index

In 2012, Cook Political Report released its updated figures on the Partisan Voter Index, which measures each congressional district's partisanship relative to the rest of the country. Alabama's 1st Congressional District has a PVI of R+14, which is the 58th most Republican district in the country. In 2008, this district was won by John McCain (R), 61-39 percent over Barack Obama (D). In 2004, George W. Bush won the district 65-35 percent over John Kerry (D).[8]

Campaign contributions

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2012 elections season. Below are candidate reports.

Jo Bonner

Jo Bonner (2012) Campaign Finance Reports
ReportDate FiledBeginning BalanceTotal Contributions
for Reporting Period
ExpendituresCash on Hand
Pre-Primary[9]March 1, 2012$371,279.88$172,181.12$(320,554.74)$222,906.26
April Quarterly[10]April 3, 2012$222,906.26$278,472.38$(308,170.85)$193,207.79
Running totals
$450,653.5$(628,725.59)

Campaign issues

Economic issues

Incumbent Jo Bonner was targeted for supporting the TARP financial bail out package and for voting to increase the U.S. debt limit.[11][12] Peter Gounares said he decided to run due to Bonner's support for bank bail outs.[13] Pete Riehm called Bonner's vote to increase the U.S. debt ceiling "abominable."[14][15] Dean Young also criticized Bonner's support of government bail outs, saying "We've given Jo Bonner 9 years to fix the problem, and the truth is, he has become part of the problem. You don't bail out companies with other people's money."[16]

Ethics investigation

In September 2011, Dean Young sent a letter to the United States House Committee on Ethics requesting that committee chairman Jo Bonner recuse himself from any oversight of his personal financial disclosure statement. Young made the request due to allegations that Bonner improperly received investigative information from the committee’s probes of two lawmakers. The alleged secret communication concerned the investigations of Charles B. Rangel and Maxine Waters. The committee’s former staff director accused two committee attorneys of improperly sharing investigative information with Republicans on the panel, including Bonner.[17][18]

Impeachment of President Obama

Pete Riehm and Dean Young, speaking at a Tea-Party sponsored event in early 2012, said they would support the introduction of article of impeachment against President Barack Obama. Young indicated he would put President Obama "on notice" prior to attempting impeachment. "First, I would cut off his funding. If that didn’t work, I would introduce a resolution describing what he’s done wrong. The last resort, which I am willing to take, would be to impeach him. We simply cannot allow him to continue to operate the way he has," Young said. Riehm cited violations of the U.S. Constitution and added, "failure to recognize wrong-doing is moral dereliction and, when you have the authority, failure to uphold the law is accessory to the crime." Incumbent Jo Bonner and candidate Peter Gounares said they did not support pursuing impeachment.[19]

RESTORE Act

Peter Gounares and Pete Riehm stated that they oppose the RESTORE Act, which would distribute oil spill fines to the governments of states along the Gulf coast. Gounares said he instead favored handing out the money to the individuals affected by the spills, claiming that it would cause a local "economic boom." Riehm accused the RESTORE Act of inflating big government but did not favor handing the money out to individuals either. Incumbent Jo Bonner disagreed, stating, "I'm trying to be respectful to a dissenting view, but I would say it's very much a minority view."[20]

Campaign for Primary Accountability

A super PAC called the Campaign for Primary Accountability spent $21,000 to try to unseat Jo Bonner. Bonner told the New York Times that “obviously, when the Supreme Court made their decision to open up corporate war chests, this is the result." Bonner said he believed he would survive the primary challenge because his campaign expenditures far exceed the money being spent against him. “If I hadn’t had $1 million in my account, I could be underwater right now,” said Bonner.[21] The Campaign for Primary Accountability assisted Dean Young in his effort to unseat Bonner.[22]

District history

Candidate Ballot Access
Ballot Access Requirements Final.jpg

Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

2010

On November 2, 2010, Jo Bonner won re-election to the United States House. He defeated David Walter in the general election.[23]

U.S. House, Alabama District 1 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJo Bonner Incumbent 83% 129,063
     Constitution David Walter 17% 26,357
Total Votes 155,420

See also

External links

References

  1. ABC News "General Election Results 2012"
  2. Alabama Secretary of State "Voter Registration Info," accessed July 20, 2012
  3. Alabama Redistricting "Map" Accessed July 7, 2012
  4. "Peter Gounares to run for 1st Congressional District seat," Al.com, November 21, 2011
  5. "Pete Riehm, second conservative challenger to Rep. Jo Bonner, launches campaign," Al.com, September 27, 2011
  6. "Conservative Orange Beach businessman Dean Young to challenge Jo Bonner in GOP primary," Al.com, August 18, 2011
  7. FairVote, "2011 Redistricting and 2012 Elections in Alabama," September 2012
  8. Cook Political Report "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" Accessed October 2012
  9. Federal Election Commission, "Jo Bonner Pre-Primary," accessed July 9, 2012
  10. Federal Election Commission, "Jo Bonner April Quarterly," accessed July 9, 2012
  11. Washington Post, "Jo Bonner (R-Ala.)," accessed February 24, 2012
  12. Al.com, "Congressional hopeful Pete Riehm wants larger federal budget cuts, including to defense," November 30, 2011
  13. Al.Com "Despite political ferment elsewhere, analysts see status quo prevailing in Tuesday's elections ," May 31, 2010
  14. Al.com, "Pete Riehm, second conservative challenger to Rep. Jo Bonner, launches campaign," September 27, 2011
  15. Al.com, "Congressional hopeful Pete Riehm wants larger federal budget cuts, including to defense," November 30, 2011
  16. Al.com "Conservative Orange Beach businessman Dean Young to challenge Jo Bonner in GOP primary," August 18, 2011
  17. Al.com "Dean Young chides Rep. Jo Bonner over Ethics Committee controversy," September 14, 2011
  18. Talking Points Memo "Only In Washington: Ethics Questions Follow Ethics Chairman," September 22, 2011
  19. Alabama Press-Register "Alabama candidates vow: 'Impeach Obama' (George Talbot column)" February 1, 2012
  20. Al.com, "GOP congressional challengers oppose RESTORE act," January 24, 2012
  21. New York Times, "‘Super PAC’ Increasing Congress’s Sense of Insecurity," March 8, 2012
  22. New York Times "Anti-Incumbent Sentiment Fuels Primary Fights in Deep South," March 12, 2012
  23. U.S. Congress House Clerk "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010"