Alaska Distribution Requirement for Initiatives, Measure 1 (2004)

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Alaska Ballot Measure 1, also called the Signatures for Initiative and Referendum Petitions Act was on the November 2, 2004 ballot in Alaska as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved.[1]

Election results

Alaska Distribution Requirement for Initiatives, Measure 1
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 149,236 51.7%
No139,64248.3%

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

This amendment changes how to gather signatures for an initiative or referendum petition. It requires signatures from more of the voting districts in the State. It says that signers must be from at least 30 of the 40 house districts, three more than now required. It further requires signatures from each of 30 districts to be at least equal to seven percent of the voters who voted in each of these districts in the last general election. Currently only one signer from a district satisfies the requirement for district participation. The total number of statewide signatures required does not change.

Changes to the Alaska Constitution

The passing of Alaska Distribution Requirement for Initiatives, Measure 1 altered Article XI, Section 3 of the Alaska Constitution.

Change in older law

Alaska's older, less restrictive, distribution requirement required that initiatives must have petition signatures from at least one voter/signer in each of 2/3rds of Alaska's forty (40) state house districts, or 27 districts.

The newer requirement as passed in 2004 is that signers must be from at least 30 of the 40 house districts, an increase of 3 districts.

Additionally, the 2004 change requires signatures from each of 30 districts to be at least equal to seven percent of the voters who voted in each of these districts in the last general election. The previous requirement was that at least one voter needed to sign from each of at least 27 districts.

Campaign Financing

Major donorations included Yes On One, who contributed $70,785, and Greater Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce, who contributed $14,600, both in support of the measure. Totaled together the two groups donated $85,385.[2]

See also

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Suggest a link

External links

References