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Arizona Corporation Commission Membership, Proposition 103 (2000)

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Arizona Proposition 103, also known as the Constitutional Amendment Relating to Corporation Commission Membership, was on the November 7, 2000 election ballot in Arizona as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. It was approved.[1]

Election results

Corporation Commission Membership
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 743,284 53%
No659,74847%
Election results from Arizona Elections Department.

Text of measure

The summary from Arizona Legislative Council read as follows:

The Corporation Commission regulates certain utilities and railroads in this state and handles the incorporating process and regulates the securities industry in this state.

Under current law, the Corporation Commission consists of three members each elected to a six year term of office. Each member may only serve a single consecutive six year term and must be out of office for a full term before being eligible to serve again.

Proposition 103 would amend the Arizona Constitution to expand the Corporation Commission to five members and to change the term of office to four years. Proposition 103 also would limit a member to two consecutive terms in office and would require a member to be out of office for at least one full term before being eligible to serve again.

This proposition also provides for a phase in process for the additional Corporation Commission members. Beginning with the election in 2002, the two new members would both serve a two year term and all later terms of office would be for a four year term.[2][3]

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References

  1. Arizona 2000 election results
  2. NCSL ballot measure database, accessed December 31, 2013
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.