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Ballotpedia's 2012 General Election Preview Articles: New York Congressional Seats

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October 29, 2012

By Ballotpedia's Congressional team

New York’s Congressional Elections in 2012
U.S. Senate Election? U.S. House seats Possible competitive races?
Yes 27 5

ALBANY: New York: There are 27 U.S. House seats and 1 U.S. Senate seat on the ballot in New York this year. Heading into general election on November 6, 2012, 100% of the congressional races are contested, meaning there are at least two candidates running in each of the 28 races. There are 25 incumbents running in the House races -— with 2 seats left open due to retirements.

In addition, New York is one of eight states that have "electoral fusion" -- which allows more than one political party to support a common candidate. This creates a situation where one candidate will appear multiple times on the same ballot, for the same position. The race is won by whichever candidate receives the most cumulative votes. Electoral fusion was once widespread across the United States, but is now commonly practiced only in New York.[1]

Opponents of fusion voting argue that the process results in dealmaking to ensure that patronage is rampant.[2] Proponents maintain that fusion voting allows for minor parties to actually make a difference during the election, allowing voters the opportunity to vote for a minority party platform but still affect the general election result.[3]

For the purposes of maintaining uniform listings of candidates across the country, the candidates will be labeled according to the primary party with which they registered. If a candidate also files under a minority party, that party will be listed next to that candidate's name.

U.S. Senate

Incumbent U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D) is running for re-election in 2012. Gillibrand was appointed to the U.S. Senate in 2009, when she filled the seat left vacant by Hillary Clinton's appointment as President Barack Obama’s Secretary of State. She was then elected in 2010 to finish out Clinton's term and is now seeking her own six-year term.[4]

Gilibrand was unopposed in the Democratic primary election on June 26th, and will face four challengers in the general election, including Republican Wendy Long.[5] Long defeated U.S House member Bob Turner in the primary. The race is not considered competitive and is listed as Solidly Democratic according to a Cook Political Report Race Rating from October 4, 2012.[6]

U.S. House

Heading into the November 6 election, the Democratic Party holds 21 of the 29 Congressional seats from New York. However, the state lost two seats after the 2010 Census reapportionment and will elect 27 representatives. Of the 54 possible major party primaries (2 parties, 27 seats), only 16 (30%) were contested, well below the national average. The remaining 38 party primaries contained only one candidate (or none at all). Highlights from the June 26th primaries include:

  • New York's 24th is considered to be a toss-up according to the New York Times race ratings. Republican incumbent Ann Marie Buerkle is challenged by Dan Maffei (D) in a district that is more Democratic than the one she won in 2010. Buerkle is considered to be the most vulnerable incumbent in New York and faces a tough rematch from Maffei.[7] In 2010, she won by .3% over Maffei[8]
  • In the 18th District, former Bill Clinton aide Sean Maloney beat four Democratic challengers to win the party nod to take on vulnerable Republican incumbent Nan Hayworth[9][10] in the general election.

According to the Cook Political Report race ratings in October 2012, 5 of the 27 districts are considered to be in play. These are the 27th Congressional District of New York, 18th, 19th, 1st and 11th districts.[11]

In New York, all polls are open from 6:00 AM to 9:00 PM, Eastern Time.[12]

See also: State Poll Opening and Closing Times (2012)

Here is a complete list of U.S. Senate and House candidates appearing on the general election ballot in New York:

[edit]

Senate

State General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
New York Class 1 Senate seat Democratic Party Working Families Party Independence Party of America Kirsten Gillibrand
Republican Party Conservative Party Republican Party Wendy Long
Libertarian Party Chris Edes
Green Party Colia Clark
Independent John Mangelli
Kirsten Gillibrand Pending Pending

House

District General Election Candidates Incumbent 2012 Winner Partisan Switch?
1st Democratic Party Working Families Party Tim Bishop
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Randy Altschuler
Tim Bishop Pending Pending
2nd Democratic Party Working Families Party Vivianne Falcone
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of AmericaIndependentPeter T. King
Steve Israel Pending Pending
3rd Democratic Party Working Families Party Independence Party of America Steve Israel
Republican Party Conservative Party Independent Stephen Labate
Libertarian Party Michael McDermott
IndependentAnthony Tolda
Peter T. King Pending Pending
4th Democratic Party Working Families Party Independence Party of America Carolyn McCarthy
Conservative PartyFrank Scaturro
Republican Party Francis Becker Jr.
Carolyn McCarthy Pending Pending
5th Democratic Party Gregory Meeks
Republican Party Allan Jennings Jr.
Libertarian Party Catherine Wark
Gary Ackerman Pending Pending
6th Democratic PartyWorking Families Party Grace Meng
Republican Party Conservative Party Libertarian Party Daniel Halloran
Green Party Evergreen Chou
Gregory W. Meeks Pending Pending
7th Democratic Party Working Families Party Nydia Velazquez
Conservative Party James Murray
Joseph Crowley Pending Pending
8th Democratic Party Working Families Party Hakeem Jeffries
Republican Party Conservative Party Alan Bellone
Green Party Colin Beavan
Jerrold Nadler Pending Pending
9th Democratic Party Working Families Party Yvette Clarke
Republican Party Conservative Party Daniel Cavanagh
Green Party Vivia Morgan
Bob Turner Pending Pending
10th Democratic Party Working Families Party Jerrold Nadler
Republican Party Conservative Party Michael Chan
Ed Towns Pending Pending
11th Democratic Party Working Families Party Mark Murphy
Republican Party Conservative Party Michael Grimm
Green Party Henry Bardel
Yvette D. Clarke Pending Pending
12th Democratic Party Working Families Party Carolyn Maloney
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Christopher Wight
Nydia Velazquez Pending Pending
13th Democratic Party Working Families Party Charles Rangel
Republican Party Craig Schley
Independent Deborah Liatos
Michael Grimm Pending Pending
14th Democratic Party Working Families Party Joseph Crowley
Republican Party Conservative Party William Gibbons Jr.
Green Party Anthony Gronowicz
Carolyn B. Maloney Pending Pending
15th Democratic Party Working Families Party Jose E. Serrano
Republican Party Conservative Party Frank Della Valle
Charles B. Rangel Pending Pending
16th Democratic Party Working Families Party Eliot Engel
Republican Party Joseph McLaughlin
Green Party Joseph Diaferia
José E. Serrano Pending Pending
17th Democratic Party Working Families Party Nita Lowey
Republican Party Joe Carvin
Independent Francis Morganthaler
Eliot Engel Pending Pending
18th Democratic Party Green Party Sean Maloney
Republican Party Conservative Party Nan Hayworth
Nita Lowey Pending Pending
19th Democratic Party Working Families Party Julian Schreibman
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Chris Gibson
Nan Hayworth Pending Pending
20th Democratic Party Working Families Party Independence Party of America Paul Tonko
Republican Party Conservative Party Robert Dieterich
Chris Gibson Pending Pending
21st Democratic Party Working Families Party Bill Owens
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Matt Doheny
Green Party Donald Hassig
Paul Tonko Pending Pending
22nd Democratic Party Dan Lamb
Republican Party Independence Party of America Richard Hanna
Maurice Hinchey Pending Pending
23rd Democratic Party Working Families Party Nate Shinagawa
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Tom Reed
Bill Owens Pending Pending
24th Democratic Party Working Families Party Dan Maffei
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Ann Marie Buerkle
Green Party Ursula Rozum
Richard L. Hanna Pending Pending
25th Democratic Party Working Families Party Louise Slaughter
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Maggie Brooks
Ann Marie Buerkle Pending Pending
26th Democratic Party Working Families Party Brian Higgins
Republican Party Conservative Party Independence Party of America Michael Madigan
Kathy Hochul Pending Pending
27th Democratic Party Working Families Party Kathy Hochul
Republican Party Conservative Party Chris Collins
Brian Higgins Pending Pending
28th District Removed in Redistricting Louise Slaughter N/A N/A
29th District Removed in Redistricting Tom Reed N/A N/A

Members of the U.S. House from New York -- Partisan Breakdown
Party As of November 2012 After the 2012 Election
     Democratic Party 21 21
     Republican Party 8 6
Total 29 27

This is a map of the congressional districts of New York before and after the 2010 redistricting. The image also includes the partisan breakdown of the districts that are close in registration figures.

Articles

See also

Alabama


References