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Black Diamond Plan Of Government Proposition (November 2012)

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A Black Diamond Plan Of Government measure was on the November 6, 2012 election ballot in King County, which is in Washington, where it was defeated.

If approved, this proposition would have changed Black Diamond CIty from a Mayor-Council plan of government to a Council-Manager plan of government. Among other things this will change the chief executive from an elected position, Mayor, to an appointed position, City Manager.[1]

Election results

Black Diamond Prop. 1
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No90258.76%
Yes 633 41.24%

Election results from King County, Current Election Results.

Text of measure

Language on the ballot:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The City of Black Diamond currently operates as a Mayor-Council plan of government under the provisions of RCW Chapter 35A.12 with an elected mayor as chief executive. Shall the City of Black Diamond abandon its present Mayor-Council plan of government and adopt in its place the Council-Manager plan of government under the provisions of RCW Chapter 35A.13 with an appointed city manager as chief executive?

no

Yes[1]

Support

Supporters of this proposition argue that this change will avoid gridlock, allow the city to be run in a more business-like manner, and results in a government that responds more reliably to the people as the entire Council makes decisions instead of just the Mayor.[1]

Opposition

Those who oppose the change of government argue that the current Mayor-Council form of government is used in most of Washington and has worked for Black Diamond City for over 50 years; it is proven and time-tested. They also urge voters to not give up their right to vote for mayor.[1]

See also


References