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Boundary Compact Between Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota

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Boundary Compact Between Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota
Formation date: 1947
Member jurisdictions: 3
Issue(s): Boundaries

The Boundary Compact Between Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota is an interstate compact among Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.

Text of the compact

The legislature of each member state passes the laws with certain modifications, but the core of the legislation remains the same.

The following compact is hereby ratified and approved:
A COMPACT
Entered into by and between the state of Minnesota, the state of Wisconsin and the state of Michigan, state signatories hereto.

The contracting states solemnly agree:

That the boundary between the state of Michigan and the state of Wisconsin in the center of lake Michigan be and it hereby is finally fixed and established as the line marked A-B-C-D-E-F-G on the map, which line is more particularly described as follows:

Starting at Point A, a point equidistant from either shore on the line which is the eastward continuation of the boundary line between Wisconsin and Illinois or latitude 42* 29' 37" north;

Thence to Point B, a point equidistant from either shore on the line drawn through the Port Washington fog signal and storm signal and the White lake storm signal, on a true azimuth of 354* 12' 00," a distance of 61.55 statute miles;

Thence to Point C, a point equidistant from either shore on a line drawn through the Sheboygan coast guard storm signal, fog signal, radio beacon and Little Sable Point light, on a true azimuth of 03* 01' 15," a distance of 22.18 statute miles;

Thence to Point D, a point equidistant from either shore on a line drawn through the Twin River Point light and fog signal and Big Sable fog and light signal, on a true azimuth of 10* 04' 30," a distance of 30.33 statute miles;

Thence to Point E, a point equidistant from either shore on a line from Bailey's Harbor inland light and Point Betsie fog signal, radio beacon, and distance finding station, on a true azimuth of 17* 09' 55," a distance of 54.20 statute miles;

Thence to Point F, a point equidistant from either shore on a line drawn through the Pilot Island light and fog signal and Sleeping Bear Point light, on a true azimuth of 33* 29' 10," a distance of 17.24 statute miles;

Thence to Point G, the point determined by the United States supreme court decree of March 12, 1936, which is a point 45,600 meters from the center of Rock Island passage on a bearing of south 60* east, on a true azimuth of 49* 34' 10," a distance of 15.66 statute miles.

The latitude and longitude of the named control points is as follows:

  • Point A: Latitude 42*29'37," Longitude 87*01'15"
  • Point B: Latitude 43*22'50," Longitude 87*08'50"
  • Point C: Latitude 43*42'00," Longitude 87*07'20"
  • Point D: Latitude 44*07'55," Longitude 87*00'45"
  • Point E: Latitude 44*52'50," Longitude 86*41'10"
  • Point F: Latitude 45*05'20," Longitude 86*14'55"
  • Point G: Latitude 45*14'10," Longitude 86*29'30"

See also

External links

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References


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