California's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
U.S. House, California District 7 General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAmi Bera Incumbent 50.4% 92,521
     Republican Doug Ose 49.6% 91,066
Total Votes 183,587
Source: California Secretary of State


2016
2012

CongressLogo.png

California's 7th Congressional District

General Election Date
November 4, 2014

Primary Date
June 3, 2014

November 4 Election Winner:
Ami Bera Democratic Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Ami Bera Democratic Party
Ami Bera.jpg

Race Ratings
Cook Political Report: Toss Up[1]

Sabato's Crystal Ball: Lean D[2]


California U.S. House Elections
District 1District 2District 3District 4District 5District 6District 7District 8District 9District 10District 11District 12District 13District 14District 15District 16District 17District 18District 19District 20District 21District 22District 23District 24District 25District 26District 27District 28District 29District 30District 31District 32District 33District 34District 35District 36District 37District 38District 39District 40District 41District 42District 43District 44District 45District 46District 47District 48District 49District 50District 51District 52District 53

2014 U.S. Senate Elections

Flag of California.png
BattlegroundRace.jpg

On November 19, 2014, more than two weeks after the Nov. 4 general election, incumbent Ami Bera (D) was declared the winner in the nation's most expensive House race of the 2014 election cycle with a total price tag of $20,721,764.[3]

After winning, Bera said, "It's been my honor serving this community as a doctor for the last nineteen years, and I am grateful I will have the opportunity to continue serving as the representative for California's 7th Congressional District in Congress."[4]

Ballotpedia identified California's 7th Congressional District as a battleground district because it only slightly favored Democrats, and Obama won the district by 5 percent or less in 2008 and 2012. Additionally, Bera was identified as a vulnerable incumbent by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC).[5]

Fueled by more than $13 million from outside groups, citizens of California's 7th Congressional District were bombarded with attack ads in this battleground district. With the help of the DCCC, freshman incumbent Bera, who won election in 2012 by only 3.4 percent, accused his challenger Doug Ose (R) of getting rich while he served in Congress.[6] Ose represented California's 3rd Congressional District from 1999 to 2005. With the help of the National Republican Congressional Committee, Ose tied Bera to Nancy Pelosi and President Barack Obama and accused him of supporting a $716 billion dollar cut to Medicaid.[7]

Despite the call from president and CEO of News & Review newspapers, Jeff vonKaenel, for the candidates and super PACs to focus on issues instead of spreading lies through "slime-filled" attack ads, Californians continued seeing Bera and Ose attack each other on the airwaves up until Election Day.[8]

During his concession speech, Ose criticized the political system and attacks on his professional success. He said, "Let me begin by saying that I celebrate the fact that our institutions and our laws provide us a system whereby elections can be peacefully resolved. I congratulate Congressman Bera on his victory. I regret that one of the themes in this election appears to have been that successful people by the very nature of their success are unworthy of elective office. In fact, people who are successful in the private sector are exactly the people we want to step forward and run for public office."[4]

In their only scheduled debate held October 8, Bera and Ose's major point of disagreement was healthcare. Ose argued that he was in favor of replacing the Affordable Care Act with a bill that would not “kill jobs”. He also expressed concern that the Affordable Care Act “strips 716 billion dollars from Medicare, which is a safety net that our seniors have come to rely upon.”[9] Bera, a doctor, supported fixing the Affordable Care Act. He said, “Now, the Affordable Care Act is not the solution that I would have come up with as a doctor and a healthcare expert, but it is now the law. So let’s take this law. Let’s fix it and let’s make it better.”[9]

The race was labeled a toss-up by Real Clear Politics and The Rothenberg Political Report.[10][11][12]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
March 7, 2014
June 3, 2014
November 4, 2014

Primary: California is one of three states to use a blanket primary, or top-two system, which allows all candidates to run and all voters to vote but only moves the top two vote-getters, regardless of party affiliation, to the general election.[13][14][15]

Voter registration: To vote in the primary, voters had to register by May 19, 2014. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 20, 2014 (the 15th calendar day before that election).[16]

See also: California elections, 2014

Incumbent: Heading into the election the incumbent was Ami Bera (D), who was first elected in 2012.

California's 7th Congressional District is located in the central portion of the state and includes much of Sacramento County.[17]

Candidates

General election candidates

Democratic Party Ami Bera Approveda
Republican Party Doug Ose


June 3, 2014, primary results

Democratic Party Ami Bera - Incumbent Approveda
Republican Party Igor Birman
Republican Party Elizabeth Emken - 2012 Republican candidate for U.S. Senate[18]
Republican Party Doug Ose Approveda
Libertarian Party Douglas Arthur Tuma
Independent Phill Tufi

Election results

General election

U.S. House, California District 7 General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAmi Bera Incumbent 50.4% 92,521
     Republican Doug Ose 49.6% 91,066
Total Votes 183,587
Source: California Secretary of State

Primary election

U.S. House, California District 7 Primary, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAmi Bera Incumbent 46.7% 51,878
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDoug Ose 26.4% 29,307
     Republican Igor Birman 17.5% 19,431
     Republican Elizabeth Emken 7.1% 7,924
     Libertarian Art Tuma 1.5% 1,629
     Independent Phill Tufi 0.8% 869
Total Votes 111,038
Source: California Secretary of State

Race background

Vulnerable incumbent

Bera was identified as a vulnerable incumbent in 2014. He was a member of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's Frontline Program, which was designed to help protect vulnerable Democratic incumbents heading into the 2014 election.[5]

Blanket primary

While Bera was almost certain to advance past the blanket primary on June 5, his general election opponent could have meant the difference between whether he was re-elected or ousted in November. Ose, the Republican frontrunner in the race, defeated the other Republican candidates in the primary.[19] Bera would likely have preferred to face Igor Birman in the general election, who was seen as being more conservative than Ose. Ose had a reputation of being a moderate Republican. Ose led the other Republican candidates in polling and fundraising prior to the primary.[19]

Outside spending

With a total price tag of $20,721,764, the race for California's 7th Congressional District seat was the most expensive House race of the 2014 election cycle. Bera raised $3,727,211 while Ose raised $3,215,639. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) were the top two outside groups who spent money in this race. The DCCC spent $4,561,579 and the NRCC spent $3,213,304.[3]

Bera commented on the outside spending in the race saying, "They want to buy Doug Ose's vote, and they're spending millions of dollars to get that vote. So, what we have to do is, as the people who live here, we have to rise up and say our democracy is about fighting for our community."[20]

Ose commented on the DCCC's spending saying, "The reality is the Democratic side wouldn't be spending two and a half or three million dollars on this race if they didn't know they had a problem."[20]

Debate

In their only scheduled debate held October 8, Bera and Ose agreed that California’s “Yes Means Yes” law, “which creates the standard on all California campuses that the absence of no does not mean consent for sex” helps protect women.[9] They also partially agreed on how to address the nation’s immigration problem. Ose said, “I think the first step that we need to take on immigration is to secure our borders and our ports of entry to prevent additional individuals coming in here that we don’t know who they are or where they come from.”[9] Bera agreed that the border needed to be secured and added, “I am a co-sponsor, though, of the comprehensive immigration bill that passed in a bipartisan way out of the Senate.”[9] Bera, however, did not address whether or not he supported amnesty for those in the country illegally.

When asked about California’s three-year drought hurting farmers and resulting in rising food costs, Bera argued that he helped get funding for Folsom Dam. He said, “When completed, that will allow us to hold on to more water during dry years and then we obviously also have a flood risk here so in years that are really wet it will keep our community more safe. We’ve got to increase storage capacity. We’ve done dozens of workshops working with the residents in the community and the water districts to let people know what they can do as well, and Sacramento County residents should be very proud of themselves. We’ve reduced our water consumption by about 20 percent. Now, we’ve got a ways to go.” [9]

Ose countered by accusing Bera of declining “to make any effort to reduce the outflows from Folsom Dam.” He said, “For the past 15 months, I’ve been talking about reducing the outflows from Folsom Dam because of the very real possibility that we’re going to need that water, and here we are. We need the water. Congressman Bera has declined to make any effort to reduce the outflows from Folsom Dam. He has today, or recently at least, come out in opposition to the tunnels which is opposite of what he was in 2010 when he was in favor of the tunnels. My problem here is we need solutions. We’ve got to protect our water resources and stop spending it – excuse me, stop sending it south. You understand, please, additional releases from Folsom Dam constitute taking our water and sending it south to Los Angeles. Congressman Bera has not spoken up on this. He has not picked up the phone and talked to the bureau about reducing outflows. That’s why we’re sending out thousands of feet per hour more than are flowing into Folsom. That has to stop.”[9]

Their major point of disagreement was healthcare. Ose argued that he was in favor of replacing the Affordable Care Act with a bill that would not “kill jobs”. He explained, “And while there are a couple things within the 3,000 pages of the Affordable Care Act that have merit, the vast majority of the bill is not consistent with the needs of this country. What we need to do is make sure that people can have coverage for pre-existing conditions, that we allow them to shop across state lines to get the best deal, and that we allow them to pick their own doctor." He also expressed concern that the Affordable Care Act “strips 716 billion dollars from Medicare, which is a safety net that our seniors have come to rely upon.”[9]

Bera, a doctor, supported fixing the Affordable Care Act. He said, “Now, the Affordable Care Act is not the solution that I would have come up with as a doctor and a healthcare expert, but it is now the law. So let’s take this law. Let’s fix it and let’s make it better. Let’s address the cost of care. That’s why I’ve worked across the aisle to come up with no-nonsense solutions working with Republicans like the Small Business and Family Relief Act that helps lower the cost of care to the average Sacramento County family. That would be $600 a year on average right back into their pockets.”[9]

The debate ended with each candidate attacking the other. Ose argued that Bera had hurt seniors by cutting $716 billion from Medicare. Bera argued that Ose would only protect the interests of Wall Street bankers, if he was elected.

Polls

General election
Poll Ami Bera Doug OseUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Garin-Hart-Yang (September 17-18, 2014)
47%43%10%+/-4.7406
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org


Primary election
Poll Ami Bera Doug OseIgor BirmanElizabeth EmkenUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
DCCC internal poll (May 1-2, 2014)
47%22%17%7%7%+/-4.1567
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Media

Igor Birman


Igor Birman - "The Real Conservative."

Ad attacking Doug Ose for being "too liberal."

Doug Ose


Doug Ose - "Fiscal Conservative."

Ad promising to fight Obamacare.

Issues

See also: Energy and the 2014 election: the ballots and beyond

Ami Bera

Bera's campaign website listed the following issues:[21]

  • National Security: "In Congress, I will uphold our most enduring principles, while protecting America from those who threaten our freedoms. I believe we must be tough and smart not only about today's challenges, such as terrorism and homeland security, but also about emerging threats, such as nuclear proliferation."
  • Medicare: "Glaringly absent from the current debate about Medicare is the Doctor’s perspective. As a physician who has worked at every level of the health care system and a candidate for Congress, I bring a unique perspective to the Medicare discussion."
  • Job Creation and Economic Recovery: "Living in Sacramento County, it is obvious that people are hurting. They are trying to do the right thing, to work hard and care for their families. But too often this is not enough. For too many, America’s promise of opportunity is beginning to seem empty."
  • Creating a New Energy Economy: "Central to our national mission is the mandate to build for future generations. We now know, however, that many of our present patterns of development and growth are both economically and environmentally unsustainable. The long-term health, security and prosperity of our nation and world require a transition in how we think about our relationship to energy use and natural ecosystems."
  • Moving Forward with Healthcare: "I have spent my professional life caring for people and educating the next generation of doctors. Unfortunately, the system consistently puts bureaucracies before the health of our patients. I have witnessed medical costs skyrocket without seeing patient care improve. And I have treated patients who would be healthier if they could have afforded basic preventive care. This is the result of an industry that puts profits before patients."

[22]

—Ami Bera's campaign website, http://www.beraforcongress.com/issues

Doug Ose

Ose's campaign website listed the following issues:[23]

  • Putting Our Community First, not the Special Interests: "Our economy is stalled by sluggish growth and one of the slowest recoveries in history. It simply isn’t providing enough opportunity for Americans who need to find a job, expand their business or hire more workers. Full time employment is becoming harder to find with the advent of Obamacare, and employers are shifting to more part-time workers."
  • Drought/Protecting Local Water Supply: "We have a real water crisis here in the Sacramento region. While man has no control over Mother Nature, poor management practices and government’s failure to build sufficient upstream retention facilities have made our region’s drought even worse. When it was predicted that California’s population was to grow by millions of people, having a shortage of local water was foreseeable."
  • Reducing the Tax Burden: "America’s complicated and contradictory tax system benefits the politically connected at the expense of people who work hard and play by the rules. Every year, Americans are asked to pay more in taxes and receive less in public services. The federal government is now borrowing 40 cents of every dollar to sustain unprecedented deficit spending."
  • Holding Government Accountable: "Government spending is growing at a record pace under President Obama. Our nation’s debt is out of control. This unsustainable and reckless spending puts our financial security at risk, and burdens the American taxpayer more every day. It’s time to hold government accountable for the money it spends and the decisions it makes."
  • Our Schools: Local Control, World-Class Standards: "Every school must be a place where every student can learn. And without world-class standards in school, America’s future is threatened. That is why education decisions must be made by parents and local school boards, not bureaucrats in Washington, D.C."

[22]

—Doug Ose's campaign website, http://www.dougose.com/issues

Key votes

Below are important votes cast by Bera during the 113th Congress.

HR 644

See also: Bowe Bergdahl exchange

Yea3.png On September 9, 2014, the Republican-run House approved H.R. 644, a resolution condemning President Barack Obama's act of exchanging five Guantanamo Bay prisoners for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.[24][25] The House voted 249-163 for resolution, with all Republicans and 22 Democrats supporting the bill. Fourteen Democrats and five Republicans did not vote on the resolution, while all other Democrats opposed its passage.[25] Ami Bera dissented from the majority of the Democratic party and voted in favor of the bill.[24][25]

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Nay3.png On September 30, 2013, the House passed a final stopgap spending bill before the shutdown went into effect. The bill included a one-year delay of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate and would have also stripped the bill of federal subsidies for congressional members and staff. It passed through the House with a vote of 228-201.[26] At 1 a.m. on October 1, 2013, one hour after the shutdown officially began, the House voted to move forward with going to a conference. In short order, Sen. Harry Reid rejected the call to conference.[27] Ami Bera voted against the stopgap spending bill that would have delayed the individual mandate.[28]

Yea3.png The shutdown ended on October 16, 2013, when the House took a vote on HR 2775 after it was approved by the Senate. The bill to reopen the government lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[29] The House passed the legislation shortly after the Senate, by a vote of 285-144, with all 144 votes against the legislation coming from Republican members. Ami Bera voted for HR 2775.[30]

Campaign contributions

Ami Bera

Doug Ose

Igor Birman

Elizabeth Emken

**As of the 2014 Pre-Primary Report, Emken's committee owed $285,000 in outstanding loans to Elizabeth Emken.

Douglas Arthur Tuma

District history

Candidate ballot access
Ballot Access Requirements Final.jpg

Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

2012

On November 6, 2012, Ami Bera (D) won election to the United States House. He defeated Dan Lungren in the general election.

U.S. House, California District 7 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAmi Bera 51.7% 141,241
     Republican Dan Lungren Incumbent 48.3% 132,050
Total Votes 273,291
Source: California Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010

On November 2, 2010, George Miller won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Rick Tubbs (R) in the general election.[64]

U.S. House, California District 7 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGeorge Miller incumbent 68.3% 122,435
     Republican Rick Tubbs 31.7% 56,764
Total Votes 179,199

See also

External links

References

  1. Cook Political Report, "2014 HOUSE RACE RATINGS FOR June 26, 2014," accessed July 28, 2014
  2. Sabato's Crystal Ball, "2014 House Races," accessed July 28, 2014
  3. 3.0 3.1 OpenSecrets.org, "Most Expensive Races," accessed October 31, 2014
  4. 4.0 4.1 KCRA.com, "Doug Ose concedes, Rep. Bera wins re-election in D7," accessed December 5, 2014
  5. 5.0 5.1 Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, "DCCC Chairman Steve Israel Announces 2013-2014 Frontline Members," accessed March 5, 2013
  6. Youtube, "No Wonder," accessed October 31, 2014
  7. Youtube, "Priorities," accessed October 31, 2014
  8. News Review, "Doug Ose and Ami Bera’s despicable attack ads," accessed October 31, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 CapRadio.org, "Transcript Of Debate Between Ami Bera And Doug Ose, Candidates For U.S. Congress District 7," accessed October 30, 2014
  10. News Review, "Doug Ose and Ami Bera’s despicable attack ads," accessed October 31, 2014
  11. Real Clear Politics, "California 7th District - Ose vs. Bera," accessed October 30, 2014
  12. Rothenberg Political Report, "House Ratings," accessed October 30, 2014
  13. National Conference of State Legislatures Website, "State Primary Election Types," accessed January 6, 2014
  14. Fair Vote, "Congressional and Presidential Primaries: Open, Closed, Semi-Closed, and 'Top Two,'" accessed January 6, 2014
  15. Ballotpedia research conducted December 26, 2013, through January 3, 2014, researching and analyzing various state websites and codes.
  16. California Secretary of State Website, "Voter Registration," accessed January 3, 2014
  17. California Redistricting Map, "Map," accessed September 25, 2012
  18. The Sacramento Bee, "Elizabeth Emken eyes challenging Ami Bera in Sacramento seat," February 23, 2013
  19. 19.0 19.1 Scribd, "CA-07 DCCC IVR (May 2014)," accessed May 7, 2014
  20. 20.0 20.1 News 10, "Bera, Ose wage increasingly expensive campaigns for Congress," accessed October 30, 2014
  21. Campaign website, "Issues," accessed April 14, 2014
  22. 22.0 22.1 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  23. Campaign website, "Issues," accessed April 14, 2014
  24. 24.0 24.1 The Hill, "House votes to condemn administration over Taliban prisoner swap," September 9, 2014
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 U.S. House, "Roll Call Vote 485," accessed September 10, 2014
  26. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  27. Buzzfeed, "Government Shutdown: How We Got Here," accessed October 1, 2013
  28. Clerk of the U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 504," accessed October 31, 2013
  29. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  30. U.S. House, "Final vote results for Roll Call 550," accessed October 31, 2013
  31. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera April Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2013
  32. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera July Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2013
  33. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera October Quarterly," accessed October 21, 2013
  34. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera Year-End," accessed February 4, 2014
  35. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera April Quarterly," accessed April 21, 2014
  36. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera Pre-Primary," accessed June 2, 2014
  37. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera July Quarterly," accessed July 23, 2014
  38. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera October Quarterly," accessed October 20, 2014
  39. Federal Election Commission, "Ami Bera Pre-General," accessed November 24, 2014
  40. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose April Quarterly," accessed October 29, 2013
  41. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose July Quarterly," accessed October 29, 2013
  42. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose October Quarterly," accessed October 29, 2013
  43. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose Year-End," accessed February 10, 2014
  44. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose April Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  45. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose Pre-Primary," accessed June 2, 2014
  46. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose July Quarterly," accessed July 28, 2014
  47. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose October Quarterly," accessed October 23, 2014
  48. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose Pre-General," accessed November 24, 2014
  49. Federal Election Commission, "Igor Birman October Quarterly," accessed October 29, 2013
  50. Federal Election Commission, "Igor Birman Year-End," accessed February 10, 2014
  51. Federal Election Commission, "Igor Birman April Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  52. Federal Election Commission, "Igor Birman Pre-Primary," accessed June 2, 2014
  53. Federal Election Commission, "Elizabeth Emken July Quarterly," accessed July 28, 2013
  54. Federal Election Commission, "Doug Ose October Quarterly," accessed October 29, 2013
  55. Federal Election Commission, "Elizabeth Emken Year-End," accessed February 10, 2014
  56. Federal Election Commission, "Elizabeth Emken April Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  57. Federal Election Commission, "Elizabeth Emken Pre-Primary," accessed June 2, 2014
  58. Federal Election Commission, "Douglas Arthur Tuma April Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  59. Federal Election Commission, "Douglas Arthur Tuma July Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  60. Federal Election Commission, "Douglas Arthur Tuma October Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  61. Federal Election Commission, "Douglas Arthur Tuma Year-End," accessed May 5, 2014
  62. Federal Election Commission, "Douglas Arthur Tuma April Quarterly," accessed May 5, 2014
  63. Federal Election Commission, "Douglas Arthur Tuma Pre-Primary," accessed June 2, 2014
  64. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013