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California Proposition 194, Employed Prisoners Not Eligible for Unemployment Compensation When Released (1996)

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California Proposition 194 was on the March 26, 1996 primary election ballot in California as a legislatively-referred state statute, where it was approved.

Proposition 194 modified California's penal code so that a prisoner's employment in a joint venture program while in prison does not entitle that prisoner to unemployment benefits once he or she is released from prison.

Election results

Proposition 194
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 4,126,987 73.94%
No1,454,91226.06%

Text of measure

Summary

The official ballot summary that appeared on the ballot said:

"Provides that prisoner's employment in a joint venture program while in prison does not entitle the prisoner to unemployment benefits upon release from prison."

Fiscal impact

The California Legislative Analyst's Office provided an estimate of net state and local government fiscal impact for Proposition 194. That estimate was:

"Probably minor overall fiscal effect."

Campaign donations

According to the campaign finance reporting system sponsored by the California Secretary of State, no money was spent supporting or opposing Proposition 194.[1]

Path to the ballot

Proposition 194 was voted onto the ballot by the California State Legislature via Senate Bill 103 (Statutes of 1995, Chapter 440).

Votes in legislature to refer to ballot
Chamber Ayes Noes
Assembly 44 15
Senate 35 0

See also

External links

References