California Proposition 196, Murders Committed by Firing from Vehicles are Punishable by Death (1996)

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California Proposition 196, also known as the Murder: Punishment Act, was on the March 26, 1996 primary election ballot in California as a legislatively-referred state statute, where it was approved.

Proposition 196 added an additional type of first-degree murder to the state's list of special circumstances that are punishable by the death penalty or by life imprisonment with no parole. Specifically, it says that the "intentional murder of a person by discharging a firearm from a motor vehicle with the intent to inflict death" is to be added to the list of special circumstances for first-degree murder for which the death penalty or life imprisonment without the possibility of parole is authorized.

Proposition 195, on the same March 1996 ballot, also passed, and added three additional types of first-degree murder to the list of special circumstances.

Election results

Proposition 196
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 4,873,194 85.8%
No806,48114.2%
See also: California ballot propositions that were approved with a vote of 80% or more

Text of measure

Summary

The official ballot summary that appeared on the ballot said:

  • Adds the intentional murder of a person by discharging a firearm from a motor vehicle with the intent to inflict death to the list of special circumstances for first-degree murder for which the death penalty or life imprisonment without the possibility of parole is authorized.
  • Joined to Proposition 195 (Chapter 477, Statutes of 1995). If both measures pass, murder during carjacking, murder resulting from a carjacking kidnap, and murder of juror in retaliation for, or to prevent, performance of juror's duties, are also added to the list of special circumstances.

Fiscal impact

The California Legislative Analyst's Office provided an estimate of net state and local government fiscal impact for Proposition 196. That estimate was:

"Adoption of this measure would result in unknown state costs, potentially ranging into several millions of dollars annually in the long run."

Campaign donations

According to Cal-Access, the campaign finance reporting system sponsored by the California Secretary of State, no money was spent supporting or opposing Proposition 196.[1]

Path to the ballot

Proposition 196 was voted onto the ballot by the California State Legislature via Senate Bill 9 (Statutes of 1995, Chapter 478).

Votes in legislature to refer to ballot
Chamber Ayes Noes
Assembly 55 12
Senate 29 3

See also

External links

References