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California Proposition 219, Uniform Application of Ballot Measures (1998)

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California Proposition 219 was on the June 2, 1998 statewide primary ballot in California as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment proposing a new amendment to the California Constitution. It was approved.

The main provisions of Proposition 219 are:

  • It prohibits any statewide ballot initiative, legislative referral, or local ballot measure from excluding or including any county, city or other local jurisdiction from being governed by the results of the vote on the measure based on how voters in a particular area voted. For example, under Proposition 219, if a majority of voters in a county voted "no" on a statewide proposition that was approved based on its statewide vote, the proposition still applies to them.
  • It establishes that statewide initiative, legislative measure, or local ballot measure cannot contain language which enables alternative or cumulative provisions of the measure to become law based upon a specified percentage of votes being cast for or against the measure.

Election results

Proposition 219
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 3,528,939 67.26%
No1,718,06932.74%
California Constitution
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXAXBXIXIIXIIIXIII AXIII BXIII CXIII DXIVXVXVIXVIIIXIXXIX AXIX BXIX CXXXXIXXIIXXXIVXXXV

Constitutional changes

Proposition 219 amended:

Text of measure

Title

The ballot title was:

Ballot Measures. Application. Legislative Constitutional Amendment.

Summary

Proposition 219.PNG

The official ballot summary for Proposition 219 was:

  • Prohibits any statewide initiative, legislative measure, or local ballot measure from excluding or including any county, city or other local jurisdiction from its application based upon voter approval or the casting of a specified percentage of votes for or against the measure within that political subdivision.
  • Provides that no statewide initiative, legislative measure, or local ballot measure can contain language which enables alternative or cumulative provisions of the measure to become law based upon a specified percentage of votes being cast for or against the measure.

Fiscal impact

The California Legislative Analyst's Office provided an estimate of net state and local government fiscal impact for Proposition 219. That estimate was:

  • "The number of measures this proposition would affect in the future, and the resulting fiscal impact, cannot be estimated."

Background

The California Legislative Analyst's Office prepared a "background" statement about Proposition 219 for the state's Voter Guide. It said:

In addition to voting for candidates for office, Californians vote on a variety of state and local measures--initiatives, referenda, constitutional amendments, bonds, and revisions to local charters. These measures are put before the voters by the state Legislature, local governing bodies (such as city councils and county boards of supervisors), and by individual citizens or groups seeking to change the law.
In most cases, these ballot measures apply to all areas within the state or a local community in the same way. For example, if a statewide measure passes, it applies to all counties in the same way, regardless of whether a majority of voters in any individual county approved the measure. One recent measure, however, was different (Proposition 172 on the November 1993 ballot). The measure, which enacted a statewide sales tax increase, provided that the revenues from the tax increase would go only to those counties that voted in favor of the measure. (Absent this vote the county could still receive the funds if the board of supervisors voted to request an allocation.) As a result, some people who otherwise would have voted "no" may have voted "yes" to ensure that their county received some of the money.
In addition, most ballot measures identify a specific policy that would be adopted if the measure passes. A recent local measure, however, contained an unusual provision. It stated that: If the measure were approved by a majority of voters, a tax for general purposes would be enacted.If, however, two-thirds of the voters approved the measure, a tax for special purposes would be enacted. Thus, a "yes" vote could mean two different things.

Path to the ballot

Proposition 219 was voted onto the ballot by the California State Legislature via SCA 18 (Proposition 219).

Votes in legislature to refer to ballot
Chamber Ayes Noes
Assembly 57 15
Senate 28 1

See also

External links