Caroline Fayard

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Cathryn Caroline Fayard
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Candidate for
Louisiana Secretary of State
PartyDemocratic
Leadership
Vice President, Louisiana Appleseed
Education
High schoolEpiscopal High School (1996)
Bachelor'sDartmouth College (2000)
J.D.University of Michigan (2005)
Cathryn Caroline Fayard was a Democratic candidate for Louisiana Secretary of State in the 2011 statewide official elections. She was the only Democrat to have declared for the office, and would have faced an uncontested primary on October 22. In the event, she failed to qualify and did not appear on the primary ballot.[1] The general election was held on November 8.

Fayard is a New Orleans-based attorney and was formerly a candidate in the special lieutenant governor election in 2010. She announced her candidacy for secretary of state on May 4 but dropped out on September 8, the final day of qualifying.[2][1]

Biography

Fayard grew up in the Baton Rouge, LA suburb of Denham Springs. She graduated from Episcopal High School, where she was valedictorian of her graduating class and a member of Navy Junior ROTC, before earning her bachelor's degree at Dartmouth College and her J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. After completing her law degree, Fayard worked at the White House and Goldman Sachs before taking a position at the Washington-based law firm of Williams and Connolly. She subsequently served as a clerk to a Louisiana district court judge, after which she served as an instructor at the Loyola University-New Orleans School of Law until 2009, when she returned to private practice.

She currently serves as vice president on the Board of Louisiana Appleseed, a non-profit that promotes access to justice.

Issues

Though she did not release any official position statements during her 2010 run for secretary of state, she made a number during her campaign for lieutenant governor in 2010. These include:

  • Reducing the size of government and shrinking waste
  • Raising standards and increasing accountability
  • Creating economic opportunities and promoting strategic planning to diversify Louisiana's economy
  • Promoting the state's tourism and hospitality industries[3]

Fayard has shown support for common conservative causes; she has said that she is pro-life[4] and supports efforts to reduce the size of government. However, she worked for then-First Lady Hillary Clinton after graduating from law school, and former Democratic President Bill Clinton raised money for her campaign for lieutenant governor. She has stated that she opposes the policies of current President Barack Obama[5], but, in a video clip widely publicized by Republicans, gave Obama a "B+" for his performance as president.[6]

Elections

2011

See also: Louisiana secretary of state election, 2011

Fayard announced on May 4, 2011 that she would seek the Democratic nomination for Louisiana Secretary of State in the 2011 Louisiana statewide official elections.[7] As of August 4, no other Democrats had announced for the race, while Incumbent Tom Schedler and State Rep. Walker Hines were battling for the Republican nod. Fayard did not qualify, however, and dropped out of the race.[1] Primaries were held on October 22 and the general election on November 19.

Legislature128.png
2011
State Executive Official elections

KentuckyLouisiana
MississippiWest Virginia

NewsCalendar

"I hate Republicans" comment

Before Fayard announced her candidacy, she received substantial attention for comments during a March 24 Democratic fundraiser, where she stated that she "hates Republicans," and that they are "cruel and destructive" and "eat their young."[8] The Louisiana Republican Party publicized Fayard's comments widely, even printing bumper stickers for its supporters that read "Caroline Fayard Hates Me." Fayard did not apologize for her remarks directly, instead stating that her comments had been taking out of context and that she was trying to make a point about the divisive nature of contemporary politics.[9]

See also

External links

References