Colorado Amendment Approval, Referendum A (1996)

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The Colorado Voter Approval of Constitutional and Statutory Amendments Referendum, also known as Referendum A, was on the November 5, 1996 ballot in Colorado as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have created super-majority requirements for voter approved constitutional amendments by requiring voter approval of proposed constitutional amendments by sixty percent of the votes cast. It also would have created a similar super-majority requirement by prohibiting the general assembly from amending or repealing any law enacted by the initiative within four years of adoption unless approved by two-thirds of all the members elected to each house of the General Assembly. Additionally, the measure would have required that initiated and referred measures to amend the Constitution be submitted to the electors at a general election and not at an election held in an odd-numbered year.[1]

Election results

Colorado Referendum A (1996)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No787,13459.11%
Yes 544,543 40.89%

Election Results via: The Colorado Legislative Council

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

An amendment to articles V and XIX of the constitution of the state of Colorado, concerning ballot measures, and, in connection therewith, requiring voter approval of proposed constitutional amendments by sixty percent of the votes cast thereon, permitting, until January 1, 2003, a simple majority of votes to approve amendments to amend or repeal any provision that was previously adopted with less than sixty percent of the votes cast thereon, prohibiting the general assembly from amending or repealing any law enacted by the initiative within four years of adoption unless approved by two-thirds of all the members elected to each house of the General Assembly, and requiring that initiated and referred measures to amend the Constitution be submitted to the electors at a general election and not at an election held in an odd-numbered year.[2]

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 20, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.