Colorado Cessation of Nuclear Weapons Component Production Initiative (1982)

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The Colorado Cessation of Nuclear Weapons Component Production Initiative, also known as Initiative 6, was on the November 2, 1982 ballot in Colorado as an initiated constitutional amendment, where it was defeated. The measure would have ended nuclear weapons component production in Colorado by allowing taxpayers to designate a portion of their income tax refunds to the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Conversion Fund. This fund would have been used by the Governor to promote the elimination of the nuclear projects. Additionally, it would have required the Governor to direct state executive agencies in similar matters, as well as an invetory of Rocky Flat facilities to determine their ability to be converted.[1]

Election results

Colorado Initiative 6 (1982)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No564,60663.40%
Yes 325,985 36.60%

Election Results via: Colorado State Legislative Council, Ballot History

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[1]

Shall the Constitution of the State of Colorado be amended in order to bring about the cessation of nuclear weapons component production in Colorado by providing that a taxpayer may designate a portion of his income tax refund to be deposited in the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Conversion Fund, by appropriating moneys in the fund annually to the governor for his use in publicizing the hazards of plutonium processing and the opportunities for conversion to other activities and in promoting the cessation of plutonium processing, and by requiring the Governor to direct state executive agencies to assist in such action and to initiate an inventory of Rocky Flats facilities to determine which are unsafe for conversion?[2]

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Colorado State Legislative Council, "Ballot History," accessed February 19, 2014
  2. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.