Dan Patrick

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Dan Patrick
Dan Patrick.jpg
Lieutenant Governor of Texas
Incumbent
In office
January 20, 2015-present
Term ends
2019
Years in position 0
PartyRepublican
Compensation
Base salary$7,200
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 4, 2014
First electedNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Prior offices
Texas State Senate, District 7
2007-2015
Education
Bachelor'sUniversity of Maryland-Baltimore County
Personal
Place of birthBaltimore, MD
ProfessionRadio commentator
Websites
Office website
Dan Patrick is the current Republican Lieutenant Governor of Texas. In that capacity, he also serves as President of the Texas State Senate. He was first elected to the office in the 2014 elections. He defeated previous incumbent, David Dewhurst, in a runoff election to secure the Republican nomination.[1]

Patrick is a former Republican member of the Texas State Senate, representing District 7 from 2007 to 2015. Patrick did not seek re-election to the Texas State Senate in 2014.

Biography

Patrick graduated with a B.A. in English from the University of Maryland-Baltimore County and is the founder of Talk Radio KSEV.

In addition to being a senator, Patrick is also the founder of Lone Star Times and is a conservative commentator. Prior to his position to the state senate, he authored the book, The Second Most Important Book You'll Ever Read.[2]

Political career

Lieutenant Governor of Texas (2015-present)

Patrick first won election to the lieutenant governor's office on November 4, 2014. He was sworn into office on January 20, 2015, replacing David Dewhurst (R).[3]

Support for religious freedom bill

On April 28, 2015, the same day the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about the constitutionality of gay marriage, the Texas Legislature was in the process of fast-tracking a law supported by Patrick allowing members of the clergy to refuse to marry any couple that infringed upon their religious beliefs.[4] [5] The bill, sponsored by State Senator Craig Estes (R), addresses a concern identical to one raised by Justice Antonin Scalia, but the bill's sponsor claims the timing is coincidental.[6]

Filed weeks after the deadline for bill filings in the Texas State Senate, Estes filed the bill at the urging of Patrick on April 28. The bill was scheduled for a public hearing on April 30, 2015 - until State Senator Jose Menendez (D) stopped he bill in its tracks with a legislative procedure that provides for at least a 48-hour delay. "When I found out what was in the bill, I thought ‘Wow, this is something that needs – people need time to be heard,'" Menendez said told reporters.[7] Menendez questioned whether the bill was even necessary, noting that he had never heard of the clergy being forced to marry someone they did not want to marry in the 170-year history of Texas.[7] State Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer (D) also expressed concern about the manner by which the bill was being introduced, telling reporters “It’s the equivalent of giving the legislative middle finger.”[8] Similar measures caused controversy in Indiana and Arkansas, but caused less controversy in Texas where the socially conservative Patrick has put his weight behind the measure.[8] The bill's sponsor, Estes, says the bill will likely be heard on Monday, May 4, 2015.[7]

Texas State Senate (2007-2015)

Patrick represented District 7 in the Texas State Senate from 2007 to 2015.

Committee assignments

2013-2014

At the beginning of the 2013 legislative session, Patrick served on the following committees:

Texas Committee Assignments, 2013
Education, Chair
Finance
Higher Education
Transportation
Joint Committee on Oversight of Higher Ed Governance, Excellence & Transparency
2011-2012

In the 2011-2012 legislative session, Patrick served on the following Texas Senate committees:

2009-2010

In the 2009-2010 legislative session, Patrick served on the following Texas Senate committees:

Issues

Launches conservative PAC

On April 12, 2010, Patrick announced the creation of a new political action committee known as The Independent Conservative Republicans of Texas (Archive). The group's goal was not to raise money or run ads, but identifying elected officials with a conservative record. Patrick said that the group became necessary in order to differentiate between Republicans and true conservatives.[9]

Wallace Hall impeachment
See also: Wallace Hall impeachment trial

After he was appointed in 2011, University of Texas Regent Wallace Hall began looking into what he believed to be clout scandals within the University of Texas system. Hall investigated the university's forgivable-loans program and admissions policies and preferential treatment to politically-connected individuals.[10] Hall, as an individual citizen, filed FOIA requests with the University system after his inquiries via his role as a Regent were rebuffed.[11] According to his accusers, Hall filed requests of more than 800,000 pages, which some Texas administrators called an unnecessary burden.[12][13] However, a letter from University chancellor Francisco Cigarroa in February 2014 said that Hall requested closer to 100,000 pages.[14][15] In addition, Cigarroa wrote: "During testimony before the Select Committee, some early witnesses implied that the U.T. System has not protected the privacy rights of students, staff, and patients. This is simply not true."[16]

An effort was begun in June 2013 to try and impeach Hall from his position as regent. Some legislators justifyed the impeachment on the grounds that Hall did not disclose several lawsuits that he was involved in when he originally completed his Regent background check. Hall updated Governor Rick Perry's office in April 2013 with the full list.[17][18] The lack of lawsuit disclosure by Hall is not unique -- more than 9,000 lawsuits were not disclosed by other appointed Texas officials.[19] No unelected official in Texas has ever been successfully impeached or removed from office.[20] Governor of Texas Rick Perry's spokesperson said the investigations send a "chilling message" to gubernatorial appointees.[21] He added that the investigation was "extraordinary political theater."[22] Texas state legislators have never previously tried to remove an appointed official. Only two elected officials in the history of Texas have ever been successfully impeached.[23]

In May 2014, Patrick said an investigation should be launched based on the findings uncovered by Hall. During a debate with David Dewhurst, Patrick said: "This is a potentially huge scandal in the making. If students who should have earned the right to go to the University of Texas Law School were denied a seat — and many are, because there are only so many seats — because a legislator’s friend, a donor’s child, or a legislator’s child or relative got in ahead of them with lower scores, that is wrong. And Wallace Hall should not be impeached because he looked at that issue."[24]

Elections

2014

See also: Texas Lieutenant Gubernatorial election, 2014

Dan Patrick TV ad for Lt. Governor

Patrick was a Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas in the 2014 election. He ran as a challenger to incumbent David Dewhurst (R), who was seeking re-election, and defeated him in a runoff election to secure the Republican nomination.[25] In announcing his bid, Patrick said Texas was in need of "authentic conservative leadership."[1] Patrick was endorsed by Empower Texans.[26] The general election took place November 4, 2014.

Patrick came in first in the primary and faced incumbent David Dewhurst in a runoff on May 27, which Patrick also won.

Results

Primary election
Texas Lieutenant Gubernatorial Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDan Patrick 41.4% 552,692
Green check mark transparent.pngDavid Dewhurst Incumbent 28.3% 377,856
Todd Staples 17.8% 236,949
Jerry Patterson 12.5% 166,399
Total Votes 1,333,896
Election Results via Texas Secretary of State.
Primary runoff
Texas Lieutenant Gubernatorial Republican Runoff, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDan Patrick 65% 489,586
David Dewhurst Incumbent 35% 263,194
Total Votes 752,780
Election Results via Texas Secretary of State.
General election
Lieutenant Governor of Texas, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDan Patrick 58.1% 2,724,493
     Democrat Leticia Van de Putte 38.7% 1,813,974
     Libertarian Robert Butler 2.6% 119,833
     Green Chandrakantha Courtney 0.6% 27,719
Total Votes 4,686,019
Election Results via Texas Secretary of State.

Race background

Primary defeat for Dewhurst

Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst was the only incumbent running for re-election in 2014 while a number of other Republicans vied for his office, including two incumbents in other statewide executive offices.

Dewhurst was previously considered to be a rising star in the Republican Party since the Texas governorship has recently been a platform for Republican presidential candidates. In his 2012 Senate run, however, he lost the Republican primary to Tea Party-affiliated candidate Ted Cruz. After that defeat, Dewhurst was seen as weakened and less conservative than the Republican base in Texas. His high-profile legislative battle with 2014 gubernatorial candidate, State sen. Wendy Davis, over abortion restrictions failed to reinforce his conservative credentials.

In the primary, Dewhurst came second to State Senator Dan Patrick. After the primary on March 4, Republican lobbyists pressured the three second-place candidates involved in runoffs to drop out of their respective races and decide the Republican nominations early. Incumbent Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and Texas Representative Dan Branch, second-place finishers for lieutenant governor and attorney general respectively, refused to do so and said that they would continue campaigning. The second-place Republican running for comptroller, however, dropped out, reducing the number of Republican runoffs to two.[27]

In the runoff on May 27, Patrick defeated Dewhurst again, securing the Republican nomination. This result meant that there were no incumbent state executives who won re-election in the 2014 elections.

Money in the race
2013

For the reporting period ending June 30, 2013, Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples had $3 million in his campaign fund - the most of the four Republican primary candidates. Sen. Dan Patrick had $2.1 million, and Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst had $1.73 million.[28] Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson had $1.3 million cash-on-hand, raising $417,000 in the last two weeks of June.[29]

Polls

General election
All candidates

Lieutenant Governor of Texas
Poll Dan Patrick (R) Leticia Van de Putte (D)Chandrakantha Courtney (G)Robert Butler (L)Margin of ErrorSample Size
University of Texas/Texas Tribune
October 10-19, 2014
52%35%4%9%+/-3.33866
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

Major party candidates

Texas Lieutenant Governor - Patrick and Van de Putte
Poll Dan Patrick (R) Leticia Van de Putte (D)Not sureMargin of ErrorSample Size
Public Policy Polling
April 10-13, 2014
51%35%14%+/-4.1559
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

Primary election
Republican primary

Lt. Governor of Texas - Republican Primary
Poll David Dewhurst Dan PatrickJerry PattersonTodd StaplesDon't KnowMargin of ErrorSample Size
University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll
October 18-27, 2013
26%13%10%5%46%+/-5.021,200
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.
Lt. Governor of Texas - Republican Primary
Poll David Dewhurst Dan PatrickJerry PattersonTodd StaplesMargin of ErrorSample Size
University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll
February 7-17, 2014
38%31%14%16%+/-5.37543
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

Hypothetical match-ups

Lieutenant Governor of Texas
Poll David Dewhurst (R) Leticia Van de Putte (D)Don't Know/NAMargin of ErrorSample Size
Public Policy Polling
November 1-4, 2013
46%37%17%+/-4.4500
University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll
February 7-17, 2014
50%32%17%+/-3.281,200
AVERAGES 32% 23% 11.33% +/-3.93 753
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

2012

See also: Texas State Senate elections, 2012

Patrick won re-election in the 2012 election for Texas State Senate, District 7. Patrick ran unopposed in the May 29 primary election and defeated Sam Texas (D) in the general election, which took place on November 6, 2012.[30]

Texas State Senate, District 7, General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDan Patrick Incumbent 68.4% 196,526
     Democratic Sam Texas 31.6% 90,793
Total Votes 287,319

2010

See also: Texas State Senate elections, 2010

Patrick won re-election to the 7th District Seat by defeating Libertarian candidate Lee Coughran in the general election on November 2, 2010.[30]

Texas State Senate, District 7
2010 General election results
Candidates Votes Percent
Green check mark transparent.png Dan Patrick (R) 184,704 86.41%
Lee Coughran (L) 29,048 13.58%

2006

On Nov. 7, 2006, Patrick won election to the 7th District Seat in the Texas State Senate, defeating opponent Michael Kubosh (L).[30]

Patrick raised $1,154,550 while Kubosh raised $1,250.[31]

Texas State Senate, District 7 (2006)
Candidates Votes Percent
Green check mark transparent.png Dan Patrick (R) 118,067 69.18%
F. Michael Kubosh (L) 52,586 30.81%

Campaign donors

Comprehensive donor information for Patrick is available dating back to 2006. Based on available campaign finance records, Patrick raised a total of $3,131,141 during that time period. This information was last updated on August 21, 2013.[32]

Dan Patrick's Campaign Contribution History
Year Office Result Contributions
2012 Texas State Senate, District 7 Won $692,044
2010 Texas State Senate, District 7 Won $697,073
2008 Texas State Senate, District 7 Not up for election $587,474
2006 Texas State Senate, District 7 Won $1,154,550
Grand Total Raised $3,131,141

2012

Patrick won re-election to the Texas State Senate in 2012. During that election cycle, Patrick raised a total of $692,044.

2010

Patrick won re-election to the Texas State Senate in 2010. During that election cycle, Patrick raised a total of $697,073.

2008

Patrick was not up for election to the Texas State Senate in 2008. During that election cycle, Patrick raised a total of $587,474.

2006

Patrick won election to the Texas State Senate in 2006. During that election cycle, Patrick raised a total of $1,154,550.

Scorecards

See also: State legislative scorecards and State legislative scorecards in Texas

Legislative scorecards are used to evaluate elected public officials based on voting record. Some scorecards are created by political advocacy groups with a focus on specific issues, while others are developed by newspapers and are broad in scope. Scorecards are meant to be used as a tool for voters to have a quick picture of whether their views align with a particular legislator's record.

Because scorecards can be specific to particular issues or general to a state’s legislative term, for example, each report should be considered on its own merits. Each entity that publishes these reports uses different methodologies and definitions for the terms used.

An overview for scorecards in all 50 states can be found on this page. To contribute to the list of Texas scorecards, email suggestions to scorecards@ballotpedia.org.

Please see our writing guidelines if you would like to add results from an individual scorecard to this legislator's profile.

2013

In 2013, the Texas State Legislature was in its 83rd legislative session from January 8 through May 27. Thirty minutes after the regular session ended, Governor Rick Perry called legislators back for a special session starting that evening.[33] Two additional called sessions were held from July 1 through July 30 and July 30 through August 5.[34]

  • Legislators are scored on bills which relate to economic freedom, the size and scope of government and individual liberty.
  • Legislators are scored based on their votes on bills relating to the organizations principles, missions and goals of responsible, conservative solutions for Texas.
  • Legislators are scored based on their votes on bills relating to core budget and free enterprise issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes for bills with the greatest impact on Texas’ environment and public health.
  • Equality Texas - Equality Texas rankings for the Texas House during the 83rd regular legislative session
  • Legislators are assigned grades reflecting votes on LGBT issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on their votes on bills relating to taxes and property rights.
  • Legislators are scored based on issues critical to businesses, taxpayers and families.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes relating to conservative issues.
  • The 2013 TLCV scorecard covers a range of votes and issues, including: water, global warming, environmental regulation, clean energy, clean air, good government, oil and gas regulation and energy efficiency.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes for bills relating to this issue of abortion.
  • Mark P. Jones is the Chair of the Department of Political Science at Rice University. He builds a ranking of Texas state representatives each year based on their votes from the previous session. Jones then ranks legislators based on how liberal and conservative they are according to legislative history.
  • Legislators are scored on their votes on key conservative issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes for Amendments 2, 12, 51, 95 and 118.
  • Young Conservatives of Texas: Legislative Ratings for the 83rd Legislature
  • Legislators are scored based on votes for House Bill 2.
  • Legislators are scored on their votes on key small business issues.
  • Concerned Women for America of Texas: Legislative Scorecard for the 83rd session.

2011

In 2011, the Texas State Legislature was in its 82nd legislative session from January 11 through May 30. A special session was called for May 31 through June 29.[34]

  • Legislators are scored based on their votes on bills relating to the organizations principles, missions and goals of responsible, conservative solutions for Texas.
  • Legislators are scored based on their votes on bills relating to core budget and free enterprise issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes on social issues, economic issues and other issues.
  • The Humane Scorecard assesses support on a broad range of animal protection issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes relating to conservative issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes relating to environment and conservation issues.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes for bills relating to this issue of abortion.
  • Mark P. Jones is the Chair of the Department of Political Science at Rice University. He builds a ranking of Texas state representatives each year based on their votes from the previous session. Jones then ranks legislators based on how liberal and conservative they are according to legislative history.
  • Legislators are scored based on 56 House votes and 38 Senate votes that offer clear public policy choice.
  • Legislators are scored based on votes for bills with the greatest impact on Texas’ environment and public health.
  • Legislators are scored based on consumer-related bills.

Empower Texans Fiscal Responsibility Index

Empower Texans produces the Fiscal Responsibility Index as "a measurement of how lawmakers perform on size and role of government issues." The index uses "exemplar votes on core budget and free enterprise issues that demonstrate legislators' governing philosophy."[35] Legislators were graded along a 0 through 100 scale in 2013 and on an A through F grading scale in 2011.

2013

Patrick received a score of 93.9 in the 2013 Fiscal Responsibility Index.

2011

Dan Patrick received a grade of A+ on the 2011 Fiscal Responsibility Index.

  • 2011 Taxpayer Champion. Patrick was named a "2011 Taxpayer Champion," which is "the top award presented by Texans for Fiscal Responsibility to legislators based on their rating on the most recent Fiscal Responsibility Index."[36]

Personal

Patrick and his wife, Janetlea, have two children: Ryan and Shane.[2]

State profile

Texas' population in 2014 was 26,956,958.

Texas' population in 2014 was 26,956,958 according to the United States Census Bureau. This estimate represented a 7.2 percent increase from the bureau's 2010 estimate. The state's population per square mile was 96.3 in 2010, exceeding the national average of 87.4.

Texas experienced a 4 percent increase in total employment from 2011 to 2012 based on census data, exceeding the 2.2 percent increase at the national level during the same period.[37]

Demographics

Texas fell below the national average for residents who attained at least bachelor's degrees based on census data from 2009 to 2013. The United States Census Bureau found that 26.7 percent of Texas residents aged 25 years and older attained bachelor's degrees compared to 28.8 percent at the national level.

The median household income in Texas was $51,900 between 2009 and 2013 compared to a $53,046 national median income. Census information showed a 17.5 percent poverty rate in Texas during the study period compared to a 14.5 percent national poverty rate.[37]

Racial Demographics, 2013[37]
Race Texas (%) United States (%)
White 80.3 77.7
Black or African American 12.4 13.2
American Indian and Alaska Native 1.0 1.2
Asian 4.3 5.3
Two or More Races 1.8 2.4
Hispanic or Latino 38.4 17.1

Presidential Voting Pattern, 2000-2012[38][39]
Year Democratic vote in Texas (%) Republican vote in Texas (%) Democratic vote in U.S. (%) Republican vote in U.S. (%)
2012 41.4 57.2 51.1 47.2
2008 43.7 55.5 52.9 45.7
2004 38.2 61.1 48.3 50.7
2000 38.0 59.3 48.4 47.9

Note: Each column will add up to 100 percent after removing the "Hispanic or Latino" percentage, although rounding by the Census Bureau may make the total one- or two-tenths off. Read more about race and ethnicity in the Census here.[40]

Recent news

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External links

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Governing, "Dan Patrick to Challenge David Dewhurst for Texas Lieutenant Governor," June 28, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 Project Vote Smart, "Biography," accessed May 24, 2014
  3. The Dallas Morning News, "Outgoing Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst saluted by Senate colleagues on last day," January 13, 2015
  4. Lauren McGaughy, Houston Chronicle, "At Patrick's urging, Senate fast-tracks 'religious freedom' bill," April 29, 2015
  5. Lauren McGaughy, Houston Chronicle, "Senator delays Texas 'religious freedom' bill amid controversy," April 30, 2015
  6. Paul J. Weber, Associated Press, Star Telegram, "Republicans pushing for passage of Texas ‘religious freedom’ bill," April 30, 2015
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Karina Kling, Time Warner Cable News: Austin, "Democrat Derails ‘Religious Freedom’ Bill from Fast-Track," May 1, 2015
  8. 8.0 8.1 Paul J. Weber, Associated Press, LGBTQ Nation, "Texas lawmakers push anti‑gay religious freedom bill on heels of Supreme Court hearing," April 30, 2015
  9. Star-Telegram, "Texas senator launches PAC to identify conservative legislators," April 12, 2010 (dead link) (dead link)
  10. American Spectator, "Transparency for Thee," October 25, 2013
  11. Daily Texas Online, "Facing impeachment, Regent Wallace Hall defends actions in debate with Sen. Kirk Watson," September 28, 2013
  12. Daily Texas Online, "Former UT System vice chancellor alleges Regent Wallace Hall’s ‘clear intent to get rid of Bill Powers’," October 24, 2013
  13. Dallas Morning News, "UT regent sought 800,000 documents, official says in impeachment hearing," October 22, 2013
  14. Watchdog, "‘Witch hunt’ fallout: Speaker calls for narrower public records law," February 5, 2014
  15. Texas Tribune, "UT System Responds to Transparency Committee Directives," February 3, 2014
  16. Texas Tribune, "Cigarroa letter to the Committee on Transparency in State Agency Operations," February 1, 2014
  17. Texas Tribune, "UT Regent Wallace Hall Updates Lawsuit Disclosures," April 30, 2013
  18. Real Clear Policy, "The Campaign Against Wallace Hall," August 15, 2013
  19. Watchdog.org, "Case against UT regent Wallace Hall is a sham — here’s proof," September 6, 2013
  20. News-Journal, "University of Texas regent not worried by impeachment inquiry," September 9, 2013
  21. Texas Tribune, "Transparency Committee to Mull Impeachment of UT Regent," June 25, 2013
  22. Texas Tribune, "Perry Blasts Impeachment Probe of Wallace Hall," October 30, 2013
  23. Texas Public Radio, "UT Regent Wallace Hall Will Testify In Impeachment Hearing," November 13, 2013
  24. Texas Tribune, "Video: Lieutenant Governor Debate in Central Texas," May 21, 2014
  25. Associated Press, "Dad: George P. Bush eyeing Texas land commissioner," November 14, 2012 (dead link) (dead link)
  26. Empower Texans, "2014 Endorsements," November 19, 2013
  27. Texas Tribune, "Lobbyist: Efforts Afoot to Get Candidates to Drop Out," March 10, 2014
  28. The Statesman, "Staples tops money race for lieutenant governor," July 15, 2013
  29. WFAA, "Campaign finance reports show cash on hand for Davis, Patterson," July 15, 2013
  30. 30.0 30.1 30.2 Texas Secretary of State, "1992 - Current Election History," accessed February 17, 2014
  31. Follow the Money, "2006 Candidate funds," accessed May 24, 2014
  32. Follow the Money, "Patrick, Dan," accessed August 21, 2013
  33. kten.com, "Texas Lawmakers To Tackle Redistricting In Special Session," May 29, 2013
  34. 34.0 34.1 Legislative reference Library of Texas, "Texas Legislative Sessions and Years," accessed June 13, 2014
  35. Empower Texans, "Fiscal Responsibility Index," accessed February 22, 2014
  36. Empower Texans, "2011 Taxpayer Champions (dead link) (dead link)
  37. 37.0 37.1 37.2 United States Census Bureau, "QuickFacts Beta," accessed March 24, 2015
  38. Texas Secretary of State, "Election Results," accessed April 14, 2015
  39. The American Presidency Project, "Presidential Elections Data," accessed March 24, 2015
  40. United States Census Bureau, "Frequently Asked Questions," accessed April 21, 2014
Political offices
Preceded by
David Dewhurst (R)
Lieutenant Governor of Texas
2015-present
Succeeded by
NA
Preceded by
Jon Lindsay
Texas Senate District 7
2007-2015
Succeeded by
Paul Bettencourt (R)