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Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Florida

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This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Florida. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Florida. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2015

See also: Florida elections, 2015 and Florida municipal elections, 2015

There are no regularly scheduled state executive, state legislative or congressional elections in Florida in 2015.

2014


Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

Florida recognizes more political parties than any other state in the nation. As of February 2015, the state officially recognized 15 political parties. In order to be recognized by the state, a political party must fulfill certain requirements, which are detailed below in "Process to establish a political party."[5]

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Democratic Party link Party platform
Republican Party link Party mission statement
America's Party of Florida link Party constitution
Constitution Party of Florida link Party platform
Ecology Party of Florida link Party constitution
Florida Socialist Workers Party link
Green Party of Florida link Party constitution
Independence Party of Florida link Party principles
Independent Party of Florida link Party constitution
Justice Party of Florida link Party platform
Libertarian Party of Florida link Party bylaws
Party for Socialism and Liberation link
Peace and Freedom Party link Party mission statement
Reform Party of Florida link Party principles
Tea Party of Florida link

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. Florida does not allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[6]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Chapter 103 of the Florida Statutes

To be recognized as a minor party in Florida, a group consisting of more than one person must file a certificate and a copy of the minor party's constitution, bylaws, regulations and rules with the Florida Department of State Division of Elections.[7]

The certificate must include:

  1. The name of the minor party
  2. The names and addresses of its current officers, including members of its executive committee
  3. A completed statewide voter registration application for each current officer and member of the executive committee, showing their affiliation with the proposed minor party.[8]

The copy of the minor party's constitution, bylaws, regulations and rules must provide procedures for the following:

  • Prescribing membership
  • Conducting meetings
  • Notifying members of meetings in a timely manner
  • Publishing notice of meetings on its website in a timely manner
  • Electing officers
  • Removing officers
  • Making party nominations when required by law
  • Conducting campaigns for party nominees
  • Raising and expending party funds
  • Selecting delegates to a national convention, if applicable
  • Selecting presidential electors, if applicable
  • Altering or amending party documents[8]

The members of the executive committee of the minor party must elect a chair, vice chair, secretary and treasurer. Each of these positions must be filled by a member of the minor party, and no member may hold more than one office, except in the case of secretary and treasurer. One member may hold both of those positions.[8]

The minor party must notify the Division of Elections within five days of any changes to the original certificate filed. Once its registration has been processed, the Division of Elections will send a letter to the minor party acknowledging its status. The minor party must then inform the Division of Elections whether or not it will collect party assessment fees from its candidates. If collected, party assessment fees are equal to two percent of the salary of the office sought by the candidate and must be paid with other fees at the time the candidate files.[7][8]

If 5 percent of the total registered electors of the state affiliate as members of a minor party by January 1 preceding a primary election, that minor party will be considered a major political party.[9]

For an example of how many registered electors must affiliate, look to the table below.

Number of registered electors in 2012 general election Number of registered electors needed to affiliate with the party
11,934,446[10] 596,722

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the State of Candidate form for candidates running for election in Florida.

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Chapter 99 of the Florida Statutes

In Florida, a candidate is not allowed to file for more than one office at a time if the terms of those offices run concurrently. Thus, any elected public official wishing to run for office must resign if the term of that office will run concurrently with the office the official currently holds.[9]

Qualifying as a candidate

Major party, minor party and unaffiliated candidates in Florida file in the same way.

All qualifying paperwork and filing fees must be submitted to the Florida Department of State, Division of Elections during the qualifying period corresponding to the office sought. Qualifying periods are as follows:[2]

  • For candidates seeking federal office, state attorney or public defender, filing may begin after noon on the 120th day prior to the primary election but must be completed no later than noon on the 116th day before the primary election.
  • For candidates seeking state office, other than state attorney or public defender, filing may begin after noon on the 71st day before the primary election but must be completed no later than noon on the 67th day before the primary election.
  • During a year in which the Florida State Legislature apportions the state, all candidates must file during the qualifying period designated for those seeking state office.

During the qualifying period, every candidate must file a full and public disclosure of financial interests, a form designating a campaign treasurer and campaign depository, qualifying fees or in-lieu-of-fee petitions, and a candidate oath. The candidate oath must be administered by the qualifying officer and must be signed in its written form by both the candidate and the qualifying officer, affirming that:[2][11]

  • the candidate is a registered voter
  • the candidate is qualified to run for and hold the office sought
  • the candidate has not qualified for any other office in the state that runs for the same term as the office sought
  • the candidate has resigned from any other public office whose term would run at the same time as the office sought
  • the assessment fee has been paid
  • if running with a political party, the candidate has not been a registered member of any other political party for 365 days before the beginning of the qualifying period.

Candidate filing fees

In Florida, candidates are required to pay filing fees and election assessment fees to the Division of Elections when qualifying. A party assessment fee may also have to be paid, if the party the candidate is running with elects to levy one. Filing fees are equal to 3 percent of the annual salary of the office sought. Election assessments are equal to 1 percent of the annual salary of the office sought. Party assessments, if required, are equal to 2 percent of the annual salary of the office sought.[12]

For examples of these fees, look to the table below.

2014 candidate qualifying fees[13]
Office sought Total fees required from party candidates if party assessment is levied Total fees required from nonpartisan candidates and party candidates with no party assessment levied
U.S. Representative $10,440.00 $6,960.00
Governor $7,816.38 $5,210.92
Cabinet, such as Florida Chief Financial Officer, Attorney General, Commissioner of Agriculture $7,738.32 $5,158.88
State Senator and State Representative $1,781.82 $1,187.88
State Attorney or Public Defender $9,188.40 $6,125.60

A candidate may waive the required filing fees if he or she submits an in-lieu-of-filing-fee petition with signatures equal to at least 1 percent of the total number of registered voters in the geographical area represented by the office sought. Signatures for this petition may not be collected until the candidate has filed the appointment of campaign treasurer and designation of campaign depository form, and the completed petition must be filed by the 28th day preceding the first day of the qualifying period for the office sought. This petition must be filed with the supervisor of elections in each county in which the the petition was circulated in order to verify the signatures. The supervisor of elections in the county will then certify the number of valid signatures to the Florida Division of Elections no later than seven days prior to the first day of the corresponding qualifying period.[14]

Write-in candidates

A write-in candidate is not entitled to have his or her name printed on any ballots, but a space is provided for voters to write in a candidate's name on the general election ballot. A candidate may not qualify as a write-in candidate if he or she has qualified to run for public office by other means.[2]

A write-in candidate is required to file a candidate oath with the Florida Division of Elections. This is due during the qualifying period for the office sought. A write-in candidates is not required to pay any filing fees.[2][11]

At the time of qualifying, the write-in candidate must reside within the district represented by the office sought.[15]

Petition requirements

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain ballot access. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in Florida.

Format requirements

In Florida, petitions are used by candidates to waive filing fees. To do this, candidates are required to use Form DS-DE 104, Candidate Petition. If reproduced, the wording and format of this form must be kept exact. Signatures on a Candidate Petition are valid only for the next qualifying period for the office sought in an election immediately following that qualifying period. For example, a candidate seeking office in the 2014 general election could not start collecting signatures until after the 2012 qualifying period ended for that office.[16]

Candidates file their completed petitions with the supervisor of elections in the county in which the petitions were circulated.[17] When filing, candidates must pay in advance to have their petitions verified. They must either pay the sum of 10 cents per signature verified or the actual cost of checking each signature, whichever is less. Candidates may submit an Undue Burden Oath if they cannot afford to pay to have their petitions verified; however, if the candidate paid a circulator to circulate the petition, that candidate may not file an Undue Burden Oath.[18] Petition fees may be paid in any of the following ways:[16]

  • With a campaign check or the campaign's petty cash
  • The candidate may pay the verification fee with personal funds and report it as an in-kind donation or be reimbursed by the campaign.
  • Someone else may pay the verification fee and be reimbursed by the campaign.

Circulation requirements

There is nothing in the Florida Statutes that prohibits a candidate from paying a circulator to collect signatures for the candidate's petition.[16] However, the statutes do not address any requirements of the circulators. There are no residency requirements for circulators.

Campaign finance

Figure 2: This is an Appointment of Campaign Treasurer and Designation of Campaign Depository form for candidates in Florida.

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Chapter 106 of the Florida Statutes

The campaign finance reporting process for candidates seeking state office in Florida is outlined below. Candidates seeking federal office must file with the Federal Election Commission. Reporting details for federal candidates are not included in this section.

Getting started

Before a candidate can qualify for office, accept contributions or make expenditures, he or she must designate a campaign treasurer and campaign depository. To do this, the candidate must file an Appointment of Campaign Treasurer and Designation of Campaign Depository form with the Florida Department of State, Division of Elections. On this form, the candidate must indicate which office he or she is seeking. However, the candidate may later change the office sought as long as he or she notifies the Division of Elections and offers to return pro rata any contributions received for the original office sought.[19]

Within 10 days of filing the Appointment of Campaign Treasurer and Designation of Campaign Depository form, the candidate must file a statement with the Division of Elections indicating that he or she has read and understands the rules and requirements for campaign finance reporting.[20]

Campaign treasurers

No contributions or expenditures, including personal funds used by the candidate, may be accepted or made for the campaign unless those funds have been processed by the candidate's appointed campaign treasurer. A candidate may appoint himself or herself as treasurer and may also appoint a number of deputy treasurers to help with the reporting process. Deputy treasurers are permitted to do everything a campaign treasurer can, as long as they have been authorized to do so by the campaign treasurer and the candidate. A candidate for statewide office may have as many as 15 deputy treasurers. Any other candidate may have no more than three. The names and addresses of all deputy treasurers must be filed with the Division of Elections.[19][21]

The campaign treasurer is responsible for receiving and reporting all contributions, but before doing so, he or she must file a written letter of acceptance of the position with the Division of Elections. Any appointed deputy treasurer must also file a letter of acceptance.[19][21][22]

In case of the death, resignation, or removal of a campaign treasurer, the candidate must appoint and certify a successor with the Division of Elections. No resignation of a campaign treasurer will be considered effective until written notice has been given to the candidate and a copy has been filed with the Division of Elections. The same is true for the removal of a campaign treasurer. Such removal will not be considered effective until written notice has been given to the campaign treasurer and a copy filed with the Division of Elections.[19]

Campaign depositories

In addition to the campaign depository named in the Appointment of Campaign Treasurer and Designation of Campaign Depository form, a candidate may also designate one secondary depository in each county in which an election is held involving the office sought by the candidate. A secondary depository must be used for the sole purpose of forwarding funds to the primary depository. Any bank, savings and loan association or credit union authorized to transact business in Florida may be designated as a campaign depository. The candidate must file the name and address of all depositories with the Division of Elections.[19]

The campaign treasurer may deposit any funds in the primary depository that are not currently being used into a separate interest-bearing account or certificate of deposit in any bank, savings and loan association or credit union authorized to transact business in the state. Such an account must be kept separate from any personal accounts, and any withdrawal of the funds in the account, whether principal or interest, must be deposited back into the primary depository for the campaign and must be reported as a contribution.[19]

Reporting

All campaign finance reports must be filed through the Division of Elections Electronic Filing System (EFS), which can be accessed here.[23]

Funds received by the campaign treasurer must be deposited in one of the designated campaign depositories within five business days of receipt. The treasurer must keep recorded accounts of all contributions and expenditures related to the campaign current within two days of any changes. All campaign accounts may be inspected under reasonable circumstances before, during or after the election by any authorized representative of the Division of Elections. Accounts kept by the campaign treasurer must be kept for a number of years equal to the term of the office sought by the candidate.[22][24]

In addition to keeping current accounts of campaign finances, campaign treasurers must file regular reports with the Division of Elections. For details on these reports, see the table below.[4]

Report Filed by Covers Due date
Monthly Reports All candidates All financial transactions related to the campaign during each calendar month starting from the time the campaign treasurer is appointed 10th day of the month following the month covered in the report, unless that day falls on a weekend or holiday, then the next business day
Biweekly Reports Non-statewide candidates All financial transactions related to the campaign starting on the 60th day before the primary and continuing until the Friday before the general election Every other Friday
Weekly Reports Statewide candidates All financial transactions related to the campaign starting on the 60th day before the primary and continuing until the Friday before the general election Every Friday
25th Day Reports Non-statewide candidates Any financial transactions related to the campaign between the last filed report and the 25th day before a primary or general election 25th day before a primary or general election
11th Day Reports Non-statewide candidates Any financial transactions related to the campaign between the last filed report and the 11th day before a primary or general election 11th day before a primary or general election
Daily Reports Statewide candidates Any financial transactions related to the campaign occurring each day, starting the 10th day preceding the general election through the 5th day preceding it The 10th, 9th, 8th, 7th, 6th and 5th days before the general election

All reports are due by midnight of the due date.[23]

The following must be included for each reporting period:[4]

  • the name, address and occupation of each person who has made one or more contributions, with the amount and date of each contribution; if the person is a corporation, a description of the principal type of business conducted by the corporation must also be reported
  • the name and address of any political committee that transferred funds to or from the candidate, with the amounts and dates of all transfers
  • the name, address, occupation and principal place of business of any lenders or endorsers of loans to the campaign, with the date and amount of such loans
  • a statement of each contribution, rebate, refund, or other receipt not otherwise listed
  • sum of all loans, in-kind contributions and other receipts for the campaign
  • the name and address of each person to whom expenditures were made, including personal services, salaries and reimbursements, with the amount, date and purpose of each expenditure; expenditures made from the petty cash fund do not need to be reported individually
  • total amount withdrawn and spent for petty cash purposes
  • sum of all expenditures made
  • amount and nature of any debts and obligations owed
  • transaction information for each credit card purchase
  • amount and nature of any separate interest-bearing accounts or certificates of deposit and identification of the financial institution in which such accounts or certificates of deposit are located

The candidate and campaign treasurer are responsible for the correctness of each report and must together attest to the correctness of the report upon filing.[4]

If no funds have been received or spent during a reporting period, the report for that period does not have to be filed. The campaign treasurer must notify the Division of Elections in writing that no report will be filed and must indicate on the next filed report that it covers the entire period between the last filed report and the one being filed.[4]

Fines

Reports not filed by the due date are subject to fines, as detailed in the table below.[21]

Number of days late Amount of fine
One to three $50 per day late
Four or more $500 per day late, not to exceed 25 percent of the total receipts or expenditures covered by that report, whichever is greater
Any number of days late for reports due immediately preceding a primary or general election $500 per day late, not to exceed 25 percent of the total receipts or expenditures covered by that report, whichever is greater

Fines must be paid to the Division of Elections within 20 days of receiving notice of the payment due.[4]

Disposing of funds

A candidate who withdraws his or her candidacy, becomes unopposed, is eliminated in an election or elected to office can no longer accept contributions and must dispose of all campaign funds within 90 days. If the candidate filed an Undue Burden Oath to waive the signature verification fee for filing petitions, that fee must be paid first from excess funds. Remaining funds can be disposed of in any of the following ways:[25]

  • The candidate may be reimbursed for personal funds added to the campaign fund.
  • Funds may be returned to contributors, pro rata.
  • Funds may be donated to charitable or tax-exempt organizations.
  • Up to $25,000 may be given to the political party of which the candidate is a member.
  • Funds may be given to the state to be deposited in either the Election Campaign Financing Trust Fund or the General Revenue Fund, as designated by the candidate.

Candidates elected to office may also dispense campaign funds by transferring a certain amount of the funds to an office fund. The amount of funds allowed to be transferred depends on the office sought.[25]

  • Statewide candidates may transfer up to $50,000 (governor and lieutenant governor are considered separate offices in this case).
  • Multi-county offices may transfer up to $10,000.
  • State legislative office may transfer up to $10,000 multiplied by the number of years of the term of office.

A candidate elected to office may also maintain up to $20,000 in his or her campaign account for the purpose of re-election. However, if he or she does not qualify to run for re-election, those funds must be disposed of within 90 days.[25]

Once funds have been disposed of, the candidate must file a report, signed by both the candidate and campaign treasurer, detailing the following:[25]

  • the name and address of any person or unit of government to whom funds were distributed, as well as the amount of funds distributed
  • the name and address of each person to whom an expenditure was made, with the amount and purpose of the expenditure
  • the name and address of the bank, savings and loan association or credit union in which funds were transferred to an office account, as well as the amount transferred
  • the name and address of the bank, savings and loan association or credit union in which funds were retained for future campaigns for the same office, as well as the amount retained.

Contribution limits

In addition to reporting requirements, candidates are subject to contribution limits, including the following:

  • In Florida, corporations are allowed to donate to candidates because they are considered by definition a "person." Thus, no person, including corporations, or political committees may make contributions in excess of the following amounts per election:[21][26][27]
  • A candidate may not receive contributions starting five days before an election and continuing through the election date. Any contribution received after this time must be returned to the contributor.[27]
  • Anonymous contributions should be reported, but not spent. After the campaign, they must be disbursed with other excess funds.[21]
  • No person may make any contribution in the name of another person.[27]
  • A candidate may not solicit contributions from any religious, charitable, or civic causes or organizations established primarily for the public good. A candidate is also prohibited from making contributions to these organizations in exchange for political support.[27]
  • Cash contributions, including contributions made by cashier's check, may not exceed $50 per election.[28]
  • A candidate cannot accept contributions in excess of $50,000 in aggregate total from county executive committees of political parties and cannot accept contributions exceeding an aggregate total of $50,000 from national or state executive committees of political parties. Total contributions from executive committees or other subordinate or affiliated committees from political parties may not exceed $250,000.[27]

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

Florida Division of Elections

Why: This agency receives and processes candidate filing paperwork.
Room 316, R. A. Gray Building
500 South Bronough Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250
Telephone: (850) 245-6200
Fax: (850) 245-6217
Email: DivElections@dos.state.fl.us
http://election.dos.state.fl.us/

Counties

See also: Counties in Florida

Though all candidate paperwork is filed at the state level, a candidate running by petition method must have his or her petitions verified by Florida's counties. Those petitions are then filed with the state. Individual county contact information is listed in the table below.

Term limits

Florida state executives and legislators are term-limited. These limits were established by Revision No. 11 proposed by the Florida Constitution Revision Commission and adopted in 1998 and by Amendment 9, which was passed by voters in 1992.

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits

The state executive term limits in Florida are as follows:[29]

There were no state executives who were term-limited in 2014.

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

A politician in Florida can serve in the state legislature for eight years, serving either four two-year terms in the Florida House of Representatives or two four-year terms in the Florida State Senate.[30]

2014

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

A total of 19 state legislators were termed out in 2014.

Name Party Chamber District
Don Gaetz Ends.png Republican Senate District 1
Arthenia Joyner Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 19
Jeremy Ring Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 29
Jimmy Patronis Ends.png Republican House District 6
Charles McBurney Ends.png Republican House District 16
Bryan Nelson Ends.png Republican House District 31
Robert Schenck Ends.png Republican House District 35
Will Weatherford Ends.png Republican House District 38
Seth McKeel Ends.png Republican House District 40
Stephen Precourt Ends.png Republican House District 44
Betty Reed Electiondot.png Democratic House District 61
Ed Hooper Ends.png Republican House District 67
Doug Holder Ends.png Republican House District 74
Matt Hudson Ends.png Republican House District 80
Perry Thurston Electiondot.png Democratic House District 94
James Waldman Electiondot.png Democratic House District 96
Elaine Schwartz Electiondot.png Democratic House District 99
Joseph Gibbons Electiondot.png Democratic House District 100
Eduardo Gonzalez Ends.png Republican House District 111

2012

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012

A total of 22 state legislators were termed out in 2012.

2010

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

A total of 30 state legislators were termed out in 2010.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Florida and List of United States Senators from Florida

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Florida:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Florida
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 1 10 11
     Republican Party 1 17 18
TOTALS as of March 2015 2 27 29

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Florida:

State Senate

Party As of March 2015
     Democratic Party 14
     Republican Party 25
     Vacancy 1
Total 40

State House

Party As of March 2015
     Democratic Party 39
     Republican Party 78
     Vacancy 3
Total 120


Recent news

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See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

Other information

References

  1. Florida Department of State Division of Elections, "2013-2014 Dates to Remember," accessed November 6, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 061," accessed December 2, 2014
  3. Ballotpedia phone call with Florida Department of State, Division of Elections on September 11, 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 07," accessed March 11, 2014
  5. Florida Division of Elections Website, "Political Parties," Updated February 11, 2015
  6. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Florida Division of Elections Website, "Frequently Asked Questions: Minor Political Parties," accessed March 10, 2014
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 103, Section 097," accessed March 10, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 97, Section 012," accessed March 10, 2014
  10. Florida Department of State, Division of Elections, "General Election County Voter Registration By Party," accessed March 10, 2014
  11. 11.0 11.1 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 021," accessed March 10, 2014
  12. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 092," accessed March 10, 2014
  13. Florida Division of Elections, "2014 Qualifying Fees," accessed March 10, 2014
  14. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 095," accessed March 10, 2014
  15. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 0615," accessed March 10, 2014
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 Florida Department of State Division of Elections, "Candidate Petition Handbook," Updated September 2013
  17. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 095," accessed March 10, 2014
  18. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 99, Section 097," accessed March 11, 2014
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 19.5 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 021," accessed March 12, 2014
  20. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 023," accessed March 12, 2014
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 Florida Division of Elections Website, "Frequently Asked Questions: Campaign Finance," accessed March 12, 2014
  22. 22.0 22.1 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 06," accessed March 12, 2014
  23. 23.0 23.1 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 0705," accessed March 12, 2014
  24. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 05," accessed March 12, 2014
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 141," accessed March 12, 2014
  26. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 11," accessed March 12, 2014
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 27.4 Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 08," accessed March 12, 2014
  28. Florida Statutes, "Title IX, Chapter 106, Section 09," accessed March 12, 2014
  29. Florida Constitution, "Article IV, Section 5," accessed November 6, 2013
  30. Florida Department of State Division of Elections, "Limited Political Terms In Certain Elective Offices, Ballot Summary, " accessed November 6, 2013