Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Michigan

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See also
This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Michigan. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Michigan. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: Michigan elections, 2014

Michigan held a primary election on August 5, 2014 and will hold a general election on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

The filing deadline for major party candidates was April 22, 2014. For independent candidates, the filing deadline was July 17, 2014. Qualified minor parties must nominate their candidates by county caucuses and state conventions, which had to occur by August 5, 2014 (for more information, see "Process to become a candidate" below). Write-in candidates seeking the nomination of a major party in the primary election had to file file a declaration of intent by July 25, 2014. Write-in candidates for the general election must file by October 24, 2014.[1]

Legend:      Ballot access     Campaign finance     Election date




Dates and requirements for candidates in 2014
Deadline Event type Event description
April 22, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for major party candidates participating in the primary
April 29, 2014 Ballot access Deadline for challenges against the petitions of major party candidates
July 17, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for independent candidates participating in the general election
July 24, 2014 Ballot access Deadline for challenges against the petitions of independent candidates
July 25, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for write-in candidates participating in the primary
July 25, 2014 Campaign finance Pre-primary report due (for period ending July 20)**
August 5, 2014 Election date State primary date
September 4, 2014 Campaign finance Post-primary report due (for period ending August 25)**
October 24, 2014 Campaign finance Pre-general report due (for period ending October 19)**
October 24, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for write-in candidates participating in the general election
November 4, 2014 Election date General election
December 4, 2014 Campaign finance Post-general report due (for period ending November 24)**
February 2, 2015 Campaign finance Annual report due (for period ending December 31, 2014)**
For more information, see "Campaign finance" below.

Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of October 2013, there are six recognized political parties in Michigan.[2]

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Democratic http://www.michigandems.com/ Party platform
Green http://www.migreenparty.org/ Party by-laws
Libertarian http://michiganlp.org/ Party by-laws
Natural Law http://www.natural-law.org/states/Michigan.html Party platform
Republican http://www.migop.org/ Party platform
U.S. Taxpayers http://www.ustpm.org/ Party platform

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. Michigan does not allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.[3][4]

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[5]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, Section 168.685

Political organizations seeking status as political parties must petition the Secretary of State for recognition. In addition to the requisite petitions, the chairperson and secretary of the state central committee of prospective party must file a certificate signed by both the chairperson and the secretary indicating the name of the party. This paperwork must be submitted to the Secretary of State by 4:00 p.m. on the 110th day preceding the general election.[6][7]

Petitions must contain signatures equaling at least one percent of all votes cast for Governor at the most recent gubernatorial election. In 2010, a total of 3,226,088 votes were cast for Governor, meaning that prospective parties must collect at least 32,261 signatures for their qualification petitions. Additionally, party organizers must collect at least 100 signatures in each of at least one half of the state's congressional districts.[6][7][8]

All signatures must be obtained no more than 180 days prior to the date of filing the petition with the Secretary of State. Signatures collected before that time will not be counted. A decision regarding the sufficiency of the petition will be made no later than 60 days prior to the general election. Petitions must meet specific formatting requirements, detailed below under "Petition requirements."[6][7]

Maintaining party status

In order to maintain qualified status, a party's principal candidate (i.e., the party's candidate who receives the greatest number of votes of all candidates fielded by the party in a particular election) must win at least one percent of the total number of votes cast for the successful candidate for Secretary of State in the most recent election for that office. In 2010, 1,608,270 votes were cast for the successful candidate for Secretary of State, meaning that a party's principal candidate must win at least 16,083 votes for the party to maintain qualified status. A party that fails to meet this requirement must petition again for state recognition.[6][7][9]

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Declaration of Intent for write-in candidates running for election in Michigan.
Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states, including Michigan, elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

For major party candidates

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, "Preparation and Filing of Nominating Petitions; Fees"

Political parties whose principal candidate received at least five percent of the total vote cast for all candidates for Secretary of State at the most recent general election are considered major parties and must nominate their candidates by primary election.[10] Major party candidates for Governor, U.S. Senate, U.S. House, or the state legislature must file an Affidavit of Identity and nominating petition by 4:00 p.m. on the 15th Tuesday preceding the primary election.[11][12] Candidates for Secretary of State and Attorney General are not nominated by primary, but by convention.[13]

The Affidavit of Identity requires the candidate to provide basic identifying information (such as candidate name, residential and mailing address, office being sought, etc.). The Affidavit also includes a campaign finance compliance statement, which the candidate must sign before a notary public.[12]

Nominating petition signature requirements vary according to the population of the electoral division (e.g., entire state, congressional district, state legislative district, etc.) and are summarized in the tables below.[14]

Statutory signature requirements for major party candidates
Population of electoral division Minimum signatures Maximum signatures
0 - 9,999 3 10
10,000 - 24,999 20 50
25,000 - 49,999 50 100
50,000 - 74,999 100 200
75,000 - 99,999 200 400
100,000 - 199,999 300 500
200,000 - 499,999 500 1,000
500,000 - 999,999 1,000 2,000
1,000,000 - 1,999,999 2,000 4,000
2,000,000 - 4,999,999 4,000 8,000
Over 5 million (statewide) 15,000 30,000
2014 signature requirements for major party candidates
Office Minimum signatures Maximum signatures
Governor[15]
U.S. Senator[16]
15,000 30,000
U.S. House[17] 1,000 2,000
State Senate[18] 500 1,000
State House[19] 200 400

Major party state legislative candidates may pay a filing fee of $100 in lieu of filing nominating petitions.[20]

Filing paperwork for federal, statewide, and multi-county state legislative district offices must be submitted to the Secretary of State. Filing paperwork for single county state legislative district offices must be submitted to the county clerk.[15][16][17][18][19][13]

For minor party candidates

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, Section 168.686a

Political parties whose principal candidate received less than five percent of the total vote cast for all candidates for Secretary of State at the most recent general election are considered non-major parties and cannot nominate their candidates by primary election. Instead, such parties must nominate candidates by county caucus and state convention.[10] Candidates for the United States House of Representatives or the state legislature may be nominated by county caucus, provided that the applicable electoral district lies entirely within the boundaries of a single county. Candidates for statewide office must be nominated by state convention. District candidates (e.g., state legislative or congressional candidates whose districts encompass parts of more than one county) may be nominated at district caucuses held in conjunction with the state convention, provided delegates from the district are in attendance.[21]

No more than one day following the conclusion of the caucus or convention, the chairperson and secretary of the caucus or convention must certify the names and mailing addresses of the selected candidates to the county clerk (if nominated by county caucus) or Secretary of State (if nominated by state convention). This certification must be accompanied by an Affidavit of Identity (the same as that filed by major party candidates) and a signed certificate of acceptance of the nomination for each candidate.[21]

Caucuses and conventions must be held by the date of the state primary election.[21]

For independent candidates

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, "Candidates Without Political Party Affiliation"

Independent candidates seeking access to the general election ballot must file an Affidavit of Identity (the same as that filed by party candidates) and a qualifying petition. All filing materials must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. on the 110th day preceding the general election.[22]

Qualifying petition signature requirements vary according to the population of the electoral division (e.g., entire state, congressional district, state legislative district, etc.) and are summarized in the tables below.[14]

Statutory signature requirements for independent candidates
Population of electoral division Minimum signatures Maximum signatures
0 - 9,999 9 30
10,000 - 24,999 60 150
25,000 - 49,999 150 300
50,000 - 74,999 300 600
75,000 - 99,999 600 1,200
100,000 - 199,999 900 1,500
200,000 - 499,999 1,500 3,000
500,000 - 999,999 3,000 6,000
1,000,000 - 1,999,999 6,000 12,000
2,000,000 - 4,999,999 12,000 24,000
Over 5 million (statewide) 30,000 60,000
2014 signature requirements for independent candidates
Office Minimum signatures Maximum signatures
Governor[15]
U.S. Senator[16]
Secretary of State, Attorney General[13]
30,000 60,000
U.S. House[17] 3,000 6,000
State Senate[18] 1,500 3,000
State House[19] 600 1,200

Signatures on qualifying petitions must be collected in the 180 days prior to the date the petition is filed. Any signatures collected prior to that will not be counted.

Filing paperwork for federal, statewide, and multi-county state legislative district offices must be submitted to the Secretary of State. Filing paperwork for single county state legislative district offices must be submitted to the county clerk.[15][16][17][18][19][13]

For write-in candidates

In order to have his or her votes tallied, a write-in candidate must submit a declaration of intent to be a write-in candidate to the appropriate filing official by 4:00 p.m. on the second Friday immediately preceding an election.[23]

Filing paperwork for federal, statewide, and multi-county state legislative district offices must be submitted to the Secretary of State. Filing paperwork for single county state legislative district offices must be submitted to the county clerk.[15][16][17][18][19][13]

Petition requirements

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain access to the ballot. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in Michigan.

Ballot access petitions in Michigan are subject to strict formal requirements, which are detailed below:

Nominating petitions for major party candidates

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, Section 168.544c

Nominating petitions for major party candidates must include language substantially the same as the following:[24]

NOMINATING PETITION (PARTISAN)

We, the undersigned, registered and qualified voters of the city or township of [name of city of township], in the county of [name of county] and state of Michigan, nominate [name of candidate], [street address], [city or township], as a candidate of the [name of party] party for the office [name of office being sought], [electoral district, if applicable], to be voted for at the primary election to be held on the [date] day of [month], [year].

WARNING: A person who knowingly signs more petitions for the same office than there are persons to be elected to the office or signs a name other than his or her own is violating the provisions of the Michigan election law.

CERTIFICATE OF CIRCULATOR

The undersigned circulator of the above petition asserts that he or she is qualified to circulate this petition and that each signature on the petition was signed in his or her presence; and that, to his or her best knowledge and belief, each signature is the genuine signature of the person purporting to sign the petition, the person signing the petition was at the time of signing a qualified registered elector of the city or township listed in the heading of the petition, and the elector was qualified to sign the petition.

Circulator -- do not sign or date certificate until after circulating petition.

[Printed name and signature of circulator; date]

[City or township where registered]

[Complete residential address]

[Zip code]

Warning -- A circulator knowingly making a false statement in the above certificate, a person not a circulator who signs as a circulator, or a person who signs a name other than his or her own as circulator is guilty of a misdemeanor.[24][25]

Nominating petitions must be printed on paper measuring 8.5 inches by 14 inches. The words "Nominating petition" must be printed in 24-point boldface type. The words, "We, the undersigned," etc. must be printed in 8-point type. "Warning," and the accompanying text must be printed in 12-point boldface type. The remainder of the petition must be printed in 8-point type. The name, address, and party affiliation of the candidate and the office being sought cannot be printed in type larger than 24-point.[24]

Signers must include their printed street address, name and date of signing, as well as their signatures.[24]

Qualifying petitions for independent candidates

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, Section 168.590h

Qualifying petitions for independent candidates must include language substantially the same as the following:[26]

QUALIFYING PETITION (CANDIDATE WITHOUT PARTY AFFILIATION)

We, the undersigned, registered and qualified electors of the city or township of [name of city or township], in the county of [name of county], and state of Michigan, nominate [name of candidate], [address of candidate], as a candidate without party affiliation for the office of [name of office sought and district, if applicable] in order that the name of the candidate can be placed without party affiliation on the ballot for the election to be held on the [date] day of [month], [year].

WARNING

Whoever knowingly signs more petitions for the same office than there are persons to be elected to the office or signs a name other than his or her own is violating the Michigan election law.[26][25]

The remainder of the petition must be written and signed in the same manner as a nominating petition.[26]

New party qualification petitions

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, Section 168.685

New party qualification petitions must include language substantially the same as the following:[27]

PETITION TO FORM NEW POLITICAL PARTY

We, the undersigned, duly registered electors of the city, township [choose one] of [name of city or township] county of [name of county], state of Michigan, residing at the places set opposite our names, respectfully request the secretary of state, in accordance with section 685 of the Michigan election law, 1954 PA 116, MCL 168.685, to receive the certificate and vignette accompanying this petition, and place the names of the candidates of the [name of proposed party] party on the ballot at the [type and date of election] election.

Warning: A person who knowingly signs petitions to organize more than one new state political party, signs a petition to organize a new state political party more than once, or signs a name other than this or her own is violating the provisions of the Michigan election law.[27][25]

Petitions must be printed on paper measuring 8.5 inches by 13 inches. The words "Petition to form a new political party" and the name of the party must be printed in 24-point boldface type. The word "Warning" and the text contained in the warning must be printed in 12-point boldface type.[27]

The remainder of the petition must be written and signed in the same manner as a nominating petition.[27]

Challenges to petitions

Written challenges to the validity of petitions may be made within seven days of the filing deadline. Complainants must note the specific petition and signatures that they contend to be invalid.[28]

Circulator requirements

Circulators must be United States citizens and at least 18 years of age. On April 3, 2014, Governor Rick Snyder signed House Bill 5152 into law. The bill removed all residency requirements for petition circulators.[24][29][30]

Campaign finance

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Michigan Election Law, "Michigan Campaign Finance Act"

An individual is legally considered a candidate for office when one of the following occurs:[31]

  • He or she files an Affidavit of Incumbency, nominating petition or qualifying petition for elective office (or pays a filing fee, if applicable)
  • He or she is nominated by a political party convention or caucus for elective office
  • He or she receives a contribution or makes an expenditure in an effort to be nominated or elected to office
  • He or she gives consent to someone else to receive a contribution or make an expenditure in an effort to be nominated or elected to office

All candidates are required to form candidate committees. Once an individual becomes a candidate, he or she is required to form a candidate committee within 10 days. Once the committee is formed, the candidate has an additional 10 days to register the committee by filing a Statement of Organization with the Secretary of State. On the Statement of Organization, the candidate must include basic personal information (such as name, political party, office sought, etc.) and basic information about the committee (including contact information, mailing address, treasurer and record keeper names and addresses, etc.). The candidate must provide the name and address of the financial depository that will be used for committee funds. A candidate may serve as his or her own treasurer, and the treasurer may elect to fulfill the duties of the record keeper.[31][32]

All candidates must file a pre-election campaign finance compliance statement, which is part of the Affidavit of Identity all candidates (barring write-ins) must file to gain ballot access. A candidate committee that does not receive or spend in excess of $1,000 in an election, or does not expect to do so, may waive reporting requirements (though such committees must still file late contribution reports, if applicable; see below for more information on late contribution reports). Any candidate who is elected to office must file a post-election campaign finance compliance statement prior to assuming office.[33]

Unless otherwise exempted, all candidates must file regular campaign finance disclosure statements, which include the following:[34]

  • Cover page
    • Includes basic information about the committee (including the state-assigned committee identification number, committee name and mailing address) candidate, and treasurer
  • Summary page
    • Includes summary information and subtotals from the subsequent reporting schedules
  • Schedule 1A: Itemized Contributions
    • For each contribution made to the committee during the period covered by the statement, the contributor's name and address must be noted, as well as the date and amount of the contribution and the cumulative total received from the contributor during the election cycle. If a contributor has given more than $100 in aggregate to the campaign, the contributor's occupation, employer, and business address must be noted.
  • Schedule 1A-1: Itemized Other Receipts
    • For other receipts (such as loans, interest payments, refunds, etc.), the name and address of the source, as well as the date, type and amount of the receipt, must be noted.
  • Schedule 1-IK: Itemized In-Kind Contributions
    • For in-kind contributions (such as goods or services donated or loaned to the campaign, etc.), the name and address of the contributor must be noted, as well as the type, value and date of receipt of the contribution. If the contributor has given over $100 in aggregate to the campaign, the contributor's occupation and employer must also be noted.
  • Schedule 1B: Itemized Expenditures
    • For each individual or business to whom the committee made a payment of more than $50 (either through a single expenditure or in aggregate during the reporting period), the recipient's name and address must be noted, as well as the purpose, date, and amount of the expenditure.
  • Schedule 1B-IK: Itemized In-Kind Expenditures
    • The name and address of the recipient of in-kind expenditures (such as donated goods or services, etc.) must be noted, as well as the type, date and value of the expenditure.
  • Schedule 1B-G: Expenditures for Get-Out-the-Vote Activities
    • For expenditures made for get-out-the-vote activities (such as busing of voters to polls, poll watchers, etc.), the name and address of the recipient must be noted, as well as the type, date and amount of expenditure.
  • Schedule 1C: Incidental Office Expense Disbursements
    • Only current officeholders must file this schedule, which is used to report disbursements made for incidental office expenses. Expenses must be itemized in the same fashion as all other expenditures.
  • Schedule 1E: Debts and Obligations
    • For debts and obligations either owed or forgiven by or to the committee, the lender or debtor must be noted, as well as the type of obligation, date and amount of each payment, cumulative payment on the debt, and outstanding balance at the close of the reporting period.
  • Schedule 1F: Fund Raiser Schedule
    • For each fundraising event, the date and location of the event must be noted, as well as the number of individuals attending, total contributions and receipts, and total event cost.

If the candidate committee spends or receives more than $5,000 in a calendar year, or expects to do so, the committee must file reports electronically via the Michigan Electronic Reporting and Tracking System.[35]

Candidate committees must file pre-election and post-election disclosure statements for each election in which the candidate's name appears on the ballot (e.g., primary election, general election). Committees must also file annual campaign statements.[33]

Statutory campaign finance statement schedule
Report type Closing date of statement Due date
Pre-election report 16 days before the election 11 days before the election
Post-election report 20 days after the election 30 days after the election
Annual campaign statement December 31 January 31 of the following calendar year

A reporting period begins after the closing date of the most recent campaign statement filed by the committee. If the committee has never filed a statement, the opening date of the first campaign statement is the earlier of the candidate's formation date or the date the committee first accepted contributions or made expenditures. This also applies to annual campaign statements, unless the committee did not file campaign statements for an election during the year.[33]

If a candidate committee receives a single or cumulative contribution of $500 or more between the day following the closing date of the last campaign statement and the third day before the date of an election, the committee must file a late contribution report with 48 hours of receipt of the contribution.[33]

Contribution limits

The table below summarizes contribution limits in Michigan. The uppermost row indicates contributor type, while the leftmost column indicates office.[36][37]

Contribution limits in Michigan
Individual Political (PAC) committee Independent (PAC) committee Caucus (PAC) committee District political party committee County political party committee State political party committee
Governor and Lieutenant Governor (with public funding) $6,800 $6,800 $68,000 $68,000 $30,000 $30,000 $750,000
Governor and Lieutenant Governor (without public funding) $6,800 $6,800 $68,000 $68,000 $68,000 $68,000 $136,000
Secretary of State and Attorney General $6,800 $6,800 $68,000 $68,000 $68,000 $68,000 $136,000
State Senate $2,000 $2,000 $20,000 Unlimited $20,000 $20,000 $20,000
State House $1,000 $1,000 $10,000 Unlimited $10,000 $10,000 $10,000
Contribution limits apply to election cycles (e.g., both the primary and general elections).
Source: Michigan Department of State

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

Michigan Secretary of State: Bureau of Elections
Why: This agency provides and processes candidate filing paperwork for state-level and judicial offices.
Physical address: 430 W. Allegan St., Lansing, MI 48929
Mailing address: PO Box 20126, Lansing, MI 48901-0726
Telephone: (517) 373-2540
Fax: (517) 373-0941
https://www.michigan.gov/sos

Counties

See also: Counties in Michigan

A candidate may need to file a number of documents with the county elections office in the county he or she resides in. Individual county contact information can be found below. In the table below, if a piece of information does not exist, it is because it could not be found for this municipality. To provide information for the table below, please email us.

Michigan county contact information
County Email Primary phone Street address City Zip code
Alcona County pattit@alcona-county.net 989.724.9410 106 5th St., Harrisville, MI 48740
Alger County mfroberg@algercourthouse.com 906.387.7053 101 Court St., PO Box 538 Munising, MI 49862
Allegan County jwatts@allegancounty.org 269.673.0450 113 Chestnut St. Allegan, MI 49010
Alpena County friedrib@alpenacounty.org 989.354.9520 720 W Chisholm St., Ste. 2 Alpena, MI 49707
Antrim County guys@antrimcounty.org 231.533.6353 203 E. Cayuga, PO Box 520 Bellaire, MI 49615
Arenac County rrockwell@arenaccountygov.com 989.846.4626 120 N. Grove, PO Box 747 Standish, MI 48658
Baraga County goodreauw@baragacounty.org 906.524.6183 16 N. Third St. L'Anse, MI 49946
Barry County pjarvis@barryco.org 269.945.1285 220 W. State Street Hastings, MI 49058
Bay County luczakc@baycounty.net 989.895.4280 515 Center Ave., Ste. 101 Bay City, MI 48708
Benzie County dolney@benzieco.net 231.882.9671 448 Court Place Beulah, MI 49617
Berrien County styler@berriencounty.org 269.983.7111 811 Port St. St. Joseph, MI 49085
Branch County tkubasiak@countyofbranch.com 517.279.4306 31 Division St. Coldwater, MI 49036
Calhoun County anorlander@calhouncountymi.gov 269.781.0707 315 W. Green St. Marshall, MI 49068
Cass County MonicaK@cassco.org 269.445.4464 120 N. Broadway, P.O. Box 355 Cassopolis, MI 49031
Charlevoix County browec@charlevoixcounty.org 231.547.7200 203 Antrim Street Charlevoix, MI 49720
Cheboygan County clerk@cheboygancounty.net 231.627.8808 870 S. Main St., PO Box 70 Cheboygan, MI 49721
Chippewa County cmaleport@chippewacountymi.gov 906.635.6300 319 Court St. Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783
Clare County mayfieldp@clareco.net 989.539.7131 225 W. Main St., PO Box 438 Harrison, MI 48625
Clinton County zukerd@clinton-county.org 989.224.5140 100 E. State St., Ste. 2600 St. Johns, MI 48879
Crawford County smoore@crawfordco.org 989.344.3200 200 W. Michigan Ave. Grayling, MI 49738
Delta County clerk@deltacountymi.org 906.789.5105 310 Ludington St. Escanaba, MI 49829
Dickinson County clerkdolly@dickinsoncountymi.gov 906.774.0988 705 S. Stephenson, PO Box 609 Iron Mountain, MI 49801
Eaton County dbosworth@eatoncounty.org 517.543.2421 1045 Independence Blvd. Charlotte, MI 48813
Emmett County gmartin@emmetcounty.org 231.348.1744 200 Division St., Ste. 130 Petoskey, MI 49770
Genesee County 810.257.3224 900 S. Saginaw St., 2nd Floor East Flint, MI 48502
Gladwin County countyclerk@gladwinco.com 989.426.7351 401 W. Cedar Ave. Gladwin, MI 48624
Gogebic County gpelissero@gogebic.org 906.663.4518 200 N. Moore St. Bessemer, MI 49911
Grand Traverse County bscheele@grandtraverse.org 231.922.4762 400 Boardman Ave. Traverse City, MI 49684
Gratiot County gratiotcountyclerk@yahoo.com 989.875.5215 214 E. Center St. Ithaca, MI 48847
Hillsdale County mkast@co.hillsdale.mi.us 517.437.3391 29 N. Howell St., Rm 1 Hillsdale, MI 49242
Houghton County pat@houghtoncounty.net 906.482.1150 401 E. Houghton Ave. Houghton, MI 49931
Huron County neall@co.huron.mi.us 989.269.9942 250 E. Huron Ave., Rm 201 Bad Axe, MI 48413
Ingham County bbyrum@ingham.org 517.676.7204 345 S. Jefferson, PO Box 179 Mason, MI 48854
Ionia County trich@ioniacounty.org 616.527.5322 100 W. Main St., Courthouse Ionia, MI 48846
Iosco County nhuebel@ioscocounty.org 989.362.3497 422 W. Lake St., PO Box 838 Tawas City, MI 48764
Iron County dhilberg@ironmi.org 906.875.3221 2 South 6th St. Crystal Falls, MI 49920
Isabella County mlux@isabellacounty.org 989.772.0911 200 N. Main St. Mt Pleasant, MI 48858
Jackson County ariska@co.jackson.mi.us 517.788.4265 312 S. Jackson St. Jackson, MI 49201
Kalamazoo County tasnow@kalcounty.com 269.383.8840 201 W. Kalamazoo Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49007
Kalkaska County dhill@kalkaskacourt.org 231.258.3300 605 N. Birch Kalkaska, MI 49646
Kent County mary.hollinrake@kentcountymi.gov 616.632.7640 300 Monroe Ave., NW Grand Rapids, MI 49503
Keweenaw County keweenawclerk@pasty.net 906.337.2229 5095 Fourth St. Eagle River, MI 49950
Lake County clerk@co.lake.mi.us 231.745.2725 800 10th St., Ste. 200 Baldwin, MI 49304
Lapeer County tspencer@lapeercounty.org 810.667.0356 255 Clay St. Lapeer, MI 48446
Leelanau County mcrocker@co.leelanau.mi.us 231.256.9824 8527 E. Gov. Center Dr., Ste. 103 Suttons Bay, MI 49682
Lenawee County roxann.holloway@lenawee.mi.us 517.264.4594 425 N. Main St. Adrian, MI 49221
Livingston County mdunleavy@co.livingston.mi.us 517.546.0500 200 E. Grand River Ave. Howell, MI 48843
Luce County lucoclrk@lighthouse.net 906.293.5521 407 W. Harrie St. Newberry, MI 49868
Mackinac County macclerk@lighthouse.net 906.643.7300 100 S. Marley St., Rm 10 St Ignace, MI 49781
Macomb County carmella.sabaugh@macombgov.org 586.469.5205 40 N. Main St., 1st Floor Mt Clemens, MI 48043
Manistee County p51nowak@manisteecountymi.gov 231.723.3331 415 Third St. Manistee, MI 49660
Marquette County pdishnow@mqtco.org 906.225.8330 234 W. Baraga Ave. Marquette, MI 49855
Mason County jriffle@masoncounty.net 231.843.8202 304 E. Ludington Ave. Ludington, MI 49431
Mecosta County mpurcell@co.mecosta.mi.us 231.592.0783 400 Elm St. Big Rapids, MI 49307
Menominee County mkleiman@menomineeco.com 906.863.9968 839 10th Ave. Menominee, MI 49858
Midland County amanary@co.midland.mi.us 989.832.6739 220 W. Ellsworth St. Midland, MI 48640
Missaukee County clerk@missaukee.org 231.839.4967 111 S. Canal St., PO Box 800 Lake City, MI 49651
Monroe County Sharon_Lemasters@monroemi.org 734.240.7020 106 E. First St. Monroe, MI 48161
Montcalm County kmillard@co.montcalm.mi.us 989.831.7339 Vital Records/Elections PO Box 368, Stanton, MI 48888 Stanton, MI 48888
Montmorency County montclerk@i2k.net 989.785.8022 12265 M-32, PO Box 789 Atlanta, MI 49709
Muskegon County clerk@co.muskegon.mi.us 231.724.6316 141 E. Apple Ave., 2nd Floor Muskegon, MI 49442
Newaygo County laurie@co.newaygo.mi.us 231.689.7235 1087 E. Newell St., PO Box 885 White Cloud, MI 49349
Oakland County brownlr@oakgov.com 248.858.0561 1200 North Telegraph Road, Dept. #415 Pontiac, MI 48341
Oceana County rgriffin@oceana.mi.us 231.873.4328 100 State St. Hart, MI 49420
Ogemaw County gklacking@ogemawcountymi.gov 989.345.0215 806 W. Houghton Ave., Rm 101 West Branch, MI 48661
Ontonagon County ontclerk@ontonagoncounty.org 906.884.4255 725 Greenland Rd. Ontonogon, MI 49953
Osceola County oscclerk1@osceolacountymi.com 231.832.3261 301 W. Upton Ave. Reed City, MI 49677
Oscoda County jwinton@oscodacountymi.com 989.826.1109 311 S.Morenci Ave., PO Box 399 Mio, MI 48647
Otsego County sdefeyter@otsegocountymi.gov 989.731.7500 225 W. Main St. Gaylord, MI 49735
Ottawa County dkrueger@miottawa.org 616.994.4531 12220 Fillmore St., PO Box 296 West Olive, MI 49460
Presque Isle County piclerk@picounty.org 989.306.0615 151 E. Huron Ave., PO Box 110 Rogers City, MI 49779
Roscommon County clerk@roscommoncounty.net 989.275.7614 500 Lake St. Roscommon, MI 48653
Saginaw County skaltenbach@saginawcounty.com 989.790.5251 111 S. Michigan Ave. Saginaw, MI 48602
Sanilac County countyclerk@sanilaccounty.net 810.648.3212 60 W. Sanilac Ave., Courthouse Rm 203 Sandusky, MI 48471
Schoolcraft County clerk@schoolcraftcounty.us 906.341.3618 300 Walnut St., Rm 164 Manistique, MI 49854
Shiawassee County lbraid@shiawassee.net 989.743.2242 208 N. Shiawassee St. Corunna, MI 48817
St. Clair County jdeboyer@stclaircounty.org 810.985.2200 201 McMorran Blvd., Rm 1100 Port Huron, MI 48060
St. Joseph County benderp@stjosephcountymi.org 269.467.5603 125 W. Main St., PO Box 189 Centreville, MI 49032
Tuscola County jfetting@tuscolacounty.org 989.672.3780 440 N. State St. Caro, MI 48723
VanBuren County learyt@vbco.org 269.657.8218 212 Paw Paw St., Ste. 101 Paw Paw, MI 49079
Washtenaw County kestenbauml@ewashtenaw.org 734.222.6730 200 N. Main Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Wayne County cgarrett@co.wayne.mi.us 313.224.6262 2 Woodward Ave., Ste. 211 Detroit, MI 48226
Wexford County clerk@wexfordcounty.org 231.779.9450 437 E. Division St. Cadillac, MI 49601

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits

The state executive term limits in Michigan are established in Article V, Section 30 of the Michigan Constitution and are as follows:[38]

There are no state executives term-limited in 2014.

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

Members of the Michigan State Senate may serve a total of two four-year terms, and members of the Michigan House of Representatives may serve a total of three two-year terms.[39]

Term limits were imposed on state legislators as a result of a constitutional amendment approved by voters in 1992.

2014

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

There are 35 state legislators who will be termed out in 2014

Name Party Chamber District
Tupac Hunter Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 5
Glenn Anderson Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 6
John Pappageorge Ends.png Republican Senate District 13
Randy Richardville Ends.png Republican Senate District 17
Gretchen Whitmer Electiondot.png Democratic Senate District 23
Mark Jansen Ends.png Republican Senate District 28
Roger Kahn Ends.png Republican Senate District 32
Fred Durhal, Jr. Electiondot.png Democratic House District 5
David Nathan Electiondot.png Democratic House District 8
Douglas Geiss Electiondot.png Democratic House District 12
Rashida Tlaib Electiondot.png Democratic House District 12
Andrew Kandrevas Electiondot.png Democratic House District 13
John Walsh Ends.png Republican House District 19
Dian Slavens Electiondot.png Democratic House District 21
Harold Haugh Electiondot.png Democratic House District 22
Ellen Lipton Electiondot.png Democratic House District 27
Jon Switalski Electiondot.png Democratic House District 28
Woodrow Stanley Electiondot.png Democratic House District 34
Peter Lund Ends.png Republican House District 36
Vicki Barnett Electiondot.png Democratic House District 37
Hugh Crawford Ends.png Republican House District 38
William Rogers Ends.png Republican House District 42
Gail Haines Ends.png Republican House District 43
Eileen Kowall Ends.png Republican House District 44
Tom McMillin Ends.png Republican House District 45
Cindy Denby Ends.png Republican House District 47
Kenneth Kurtz Ends.png Republican House District 58
Matt Lori Ends.png Republican House District 59
Kate Segal Electiondot.png Democratic House District 62
Jase Bolger Ends.png Republican House District 63
Kevin Daley Ends.png Republican House District 82
Bob Genetski Ends.png Republican House District 88
Joe Haveman Ends.png Republican House District 90
Jim Stamas Ends.png Republican House District 98
Wayne Schmidt Ends.png Republican House District 104

2012

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012

There were no Michigan State Senate elections in 2012. There were 14 state representatives termed out in 2012.

2010

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

There were 66 state legislators termed out in 2010.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Michigan and List of United States Senators from Michigan

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Michigan:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Michigan
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 2 5 7
     Republican Party 0 9 9
TOTALS as of October 2014 2 14 16

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Michigan:

Senate

Party As of October 2014
     Democratic Party 12
     Republican Party 26
Total 38

House

Party As of October 2014
     Democratic Party 50
     Republican Party 59
     Independent 1
Total 110

See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

News

Other information

References

  1. Michigan Secretary of State, "2014 Michigan Election Dates," accessed February 26, 2014
  2. State of Michigan Department of State, "State of Michigan Political Party Status, May 16, 2013
  3. Michigan Election Law, "Chapter XXIVA, Section 168.590," accessed December 5, 2013
  4. Michigan Election Law, "Chapter XXIVA, Section 168.685," accessed December 5, 2013
  5. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.685," accessed February 26, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Michigan Department of State, "New Political Party Qualification," accessed February 26, 2014
  8. Michigan Department of State, "Election Results - General Election - Governor - November 2, 2010," accessed February 26, 2014
  9. Michigan Department of State, "Election Results - General Election - Secretary of State - November 2, 2010," accessed February 26, 2014
  10. 10.0 10.1 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.532," accessed February 26, 2014
  11. Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.551," accessed February 26, 2014
  12. 12.0 12.1 Michigan Department of State, "Affidavit of Identity and Receipt of Filing," accessed February 26, 2014
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 Michigan Department of State, "Filing Requirements: Secretary of State, Attorney General, 2014 Election Cycle," accessed February 26, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.544f," accessed February 26, 2014
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 Michigan Department of State, "Filing Requirements: Office of Governor, 2014 Election Cycle," accessed February 26, 2014
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 Michigan Department of State, "Filing Requirements: Office of U.S. Senator, 2014 Election Cycle," accessed February 26, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 Michigan Department of State, "Filing Requirements: Office of U.S. Representative in Congress, 2014 Election Cycle," accessed February 26, 2014
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 Michigan Department of State, "Filing Requirements: Office of State Senator, 2014 Election Cycle," accessed February 26, 2014
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 Michigan Department of State, "Filing Requirements: Office of State Representative, 2014 Election Cycle," accessed February 26, 2014
  20. Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.163," accessed February 26, 2014
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.686a," accessed February 26, 2014
  22. Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.590c," accessed February 26, 2014
  23. Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.737a," accessed February 26, 2014
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.544c," accessed February 27, 2014
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.590h," accessed February 27, 2014
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.685," accessed February 26, 2014
  28. Michigan Election Law, "Section 168.552," accessed February 27, 2014
  29. Ballot Access News, "Michigan Repeals Ban on Out-of-State Circulators," April 5, 2014
  30. Michigan Legislative Website, "House Bill 5152 (2013)," accessed April 7, 2014
  31. 31.0 31.1 Michigan Electronic Reporting and Tracking System, "The Statement of Organization Forming and Registering a Candidate Committee," accessed February 27, 2014
  32. Michigan Department of State, "Statement of Organization Form for Candidate Committees," accessed February 27, 2014
  33. 33.0 33.1 33.2 33.3 Michigan Electronic Reporting and Tracking System, "Campaign Finance Disclosure Requirements," accessed February 27, 2014
  34. Michigan Department of State, "Candidate Committee Campaign Statement Instructions and Forms," accessed February 27, 2014
  35. Michigan Electronic Reporting and Tracking System, "Appendix D: Electronic Filing of Campaign Statements," accessed February 27, 2014
  36. Michigan Election Law, "Section 169.252," accessed February 27, 2014
  37. Michigan Department of State, "Election Cycle Campaign Finance Contribution Limits for State Level Office, Local Level Office, Judicial and Caucus Committee PACs," accessed February 27, 2014
  38. Michigan Constitution, "Article V, Section 30," accessed November 13, 2013
  39. Michigan Constitution, "Article IV, Section 54," accessed November 13, 2013