Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Minnesota

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Ballot Access Requirements for Candidates
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U.S. House requirements for Independents in 2014
This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Minnesota. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Minnesota. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included. This page reflects research completed in April 2014.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2014

See also: Minnesota elections, 2014

Minnesota will hold a primary election on August 12, 2014 and a general election on November 4, 2014. Voters will elect candidates to serve in the following state and federal offices:

The candidate filing deadline for the 2014 elections was June 3, 2014.[1] The filing deadline to create a new political party for the 2014 elections was also June 3, 2014.[2]

Legend:      Ballot Access     Campaign Finance     Election Date




Dates and requirements for candidates in 2014
Deadline Event type Event description
April 14, 2014 Campaign finance First quarter report due for constitutional office candidates**
May 20, 2014 Ballot access Candidate filing period opens
June 3, 2014 Ballot access Filing deadline for candidates and new political parties
June 16, 2014 Campaign finance Second quarter report due for constitutional office candidates**
July 28, 2014 Campaign finance Pre-primary report due for state legislative and constitutional office candidates**
August 12, 2014 Election date Primary election date
September 23, 2014 Campaign finance 42nd day pre-general due for constitutional office candidates**
October 27, 2014 Campaign finance Pre-general report due for state legislative candidates; 10th day pre-general report due for constitutional office candidates**
November 4, 2014 Election date General election
February 2, 2015 Campaign finance Year-end report due for state legislative and constitutional office candidates**
For more information, see "Campaign finance" below.

Political parties

As of November 2013, there are five recognized political parties in Minnesota.[3] The Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party, the Republican Party and the Independence Party are considered major parties. The Libertarian and Grassroots parties are considered minor parties. For more information about the difference between major and minor political parties, see "Process to establish a political party" below.

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Libertarian http://www.lpmn.org/ Party platform
Grassroots Party http://mngreens.org/ Party platform
Republican http://mngop.com/ Party platform
Independence Party http://www.mnip.org/ Party platform
Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party http://www.dfl.org/ Party platform

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. Minnesota[4] does allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[5]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 200.02"

Minnesota recognizes two classes of political parties: major parties and minor parties.

Qualifying as a major party

A party may qualify as a major political party via one of the methods described below:[6]

1.) Fielding one candidate who wins five percent of the total vote cast in the election

The party must have fielded at least one candidate for election to the office of:[6]

a.) Governor and Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State Auditor or Attorney General at the last preceding state general election for those offices; or
b.) Presidential electors or United States Senator at the last preceding state general election for presidential electors.

The candidate must have received votes in each county in that election. In total, the candidate must have received votes equaling at least five percent of the total number of individuals who voted in that election.[6] For example, 2,123,369 individuals voted in 2010, meaning that a party's candidate would need to win at least 106,169 votes in order for the party to qualify for major party status.[7]

A party whose candidate meets these requirements becomes a major party as of January 1 following that election and retains such status for at least two consecutive general elections, even if the party fields a candidate who does not win the requisite votes. If the party fails in each of two consecutive general elections to field a candidate who meets these requirements, however, the party will lose major party status as of December 31 following the latter of the two elections.[6]

2.) Fielding a full slate of candidates

The party must have fielded at least 45 candidates for election as state representatives, 23 candidates for election as state senators, four candidates for election as congressional representatives, and one candidate for election to each of the following offices: Governor and Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State and State Auditor at the last preceding state general election for those offices -- a total of 76 offices.[6]

A party who fields this slate of candidates becomes a major party as of January 1 following that election and retains such status for at least two consecutive general elections, even if the party fails to field the requisite slate of candidates. If the party does not field the necessary slate of candidates for two consecutive general elections, however, the party will lose major party status as of December 31 following the latter of the two consecutive elections.[6]

3.) Petitioning the Secretary of State for recognition

The party must present to the Secretary of State a petition for a place on the state partisan primary ballot.[6]

a.) The petition must contain signatures equal to at least five percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the preceding state general election. For example, 2,123,369 individuals voted in 2010, meaning that a party would need to collect at least 106,169 signatures in order for the party to qualify for major party status.[7]
b.) The petition must be submitted before the close of the filing period for the state partisan primary ballot.

Upon qualifying for a place on the primary ballot, the party must field candidates via one of the two methods above.[6]

Qualifying as a minor party

A party may qualify as a minor political party via one of the methods described below:[6]

1.) Fielding one candidate who wins at least one percent of the vote in the election

The party must have fielded at least one candidate for election to the office of:[6]

a.) Governor and Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State Auditor or Attorney General at the last preceding state general election for those offices; or
b.) Presidential electors or United States Senator at the preceding state general election for presidential electors.

The candidate must have received votes in each county. In total, the candidate must have received votes equaling at least one percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the election.[6] For example, 2,123,369 individuals voted in 2010, meaning that a party's candidate would need to win at least 21,234 votes in order for the party to qualify for minor party status.[7]

A party whose candidate meets these requirements becomes a minor party as of January 1 following that election and retains such status for at least two consecutive general elections, even if the party fields a candidate who does not win the requisite votes. If the party fails in each of two consecutive general elections to field a candidate who meets these requirements, however, the party will lose minor party status as of December 31 following the latter of the two elections.[6]

2.) Petitioning the Secretary of State for recognition

The party must present to the Secretary of State a petition for a place on the general election ballot.[6]

a.) The petition must contain signatures equal to at least one percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the preceding state general election. For example, 2,123,369 individuals voted in 2010, meaning that a party would need to collect at least 21,234 signatures in order to qualify for minor party status.[7]
b.) The petition must be submitted before the close of the filing period for the state partisan primary ballot.

Upon qualifying for a place on the general election ballot, the party must field candidates in the method described above to maintain status.[6]

To be considered a minor party in an election in a state legislative district, the party must have fielded a candidate for legislative office in that district who won at least 10 percent of the total number of votes cast for that office, or the party must present the Secretary of State with a petition containing signatures equaling at least 10 percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the preceding state general election for that office.[6]

Procedural requirements

The relevant statutes stipulate that a major political party must maintain a party organization in the state in accordance with the following requirements:[6][8]

  • The final authority over the affairs of each major party is vested in the party's state convention, which must be held at least once every general election.
  • Subject to the control of the state convention, the general management of party affairs is vested in the state central committee.
  • The state executive committee of a party is responsible for the administration of the party's affairs, subject to the direction of the state convention and state central committee.
  • The chair of the state central committee of each party must file a copy of the party's constitution with the Secretary of State as soon as they are enacted.

Similarly, a minor party must submit a certification to the Secretary of State by December 31 each general election year demonstrating that it has adopted a state constitution, designated a state party chair, and held a state convention in the last two years.[6]

Major parties must nominate their candidates for office by primary election. Minor parties are not entitled to participate in primary elections and instead must field candidates via nominating petitions (see "Process to become a candidate" below for more information).[9]

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Affidavit of Candidacy for candidates running for election in Minnesota.
Quick facts about Lieutenant Governors
  • 45 states have Lt. governors, 43 of them fill the office by election
  • 21 states, including Minnesota, elect Lt. governors on a single ticket with the governor at both the primary and general elections
  • 5 states elect Lt. governors separately from Governors at the primary and then put the top two vote-getters together on the general election ballot
  • 17 states elect Lt. governors separately from the Governor

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Chapter 204B. Elections; General Provisions"

For major party candidates

Major party candidates seeking access to the primary ballot must file an Affidavit of Candidacy. The affidavit must state the following, regardless of the office being sought:[10][11]

  • That the candidate is an eligible voter
  • That the candidate has no other affidavit on file as a candidate for any other office at the same primary or next ensuing general election
  • That the candidate is 21 years old, or will be at the time he or she assumes office, and that the candidate will maintain a residence in the district from which he or she is seeking election for 30 days prior to the general election
  • That the candidate's name as written on the affidavit for ballot designation is the candidate's true name or the name by which he or she is commonly known in the community

The candidate must also include his or her address and telephone number. Major party candidates must indicate on their affidavits that they have either participated in the party's most recent precinct caucus or intend to vote for a majority of the party's candidates at the next ensuing general election. The affidavit includes office-specific information, as well.[10][11]

In addition the Affidavit of Candidacy, a major party candidate must either pay a filing fee or submit a petition in lieu of paying the filing fee. Filing fees vary according to office and are as follows:[11][12]

Filing fees
Office Filing fee
Governor
Attorney General
Auditor
Secretary of State
U.S. Representative
$300
U.S. Senator $400
State legislature $100

If the candidate elects to submit a petition in lieu of paying the filing fee, the petition must meet the following signature requirements:[11][12]

Signature requirements for petitions in lieu of filing fees
Office Required signatures
Governor
Attorney General
Auditor
Secretary of State
U.S. Senator
2,000
U.S. Representative 1,000
State legislature 500

Candidates must file between the 84th day preceding the primary election and the 70th day preceding the primary. Candidates for federal office must file with the Secretary of State. Candidates for state-level office may file with the county auditor of their county of residence or the Secretary of State.[11][13]

For minor party and independent candidates

A minor party or independent candidate seeking access to the general election ballot must file an Affidavit of Candidacy meeting the same specifications as that filed by a major party candidate. Instead of including the name of his or her political party, independent candidates may designate a non-recognized party or political principle, provided that the designation is made in three words or less and does not suggest similarity with an existing recognized party.[10][14]

Minor party and independent candidates must also submit a nominating petition. For federal or statewide office, signatures must equal either one percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the state at the last preceding state general election, or 2,000, whichever is less. For congressional office, signatures must equal either five percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the district at the last preceding state general election, or 1,000, whichever is less. For state legislative office, signatures must equal either 10 percent of the total number of individuals who voted in the legislative district at the last preceding state general election, or 500, whichever is less. Signature requirements and examples are summarized in the table below:[14][15][7]

Nominating petition signature requirements
Office Applicable percentage of votes cast in 2010 Lesser of % of votes cast or statutory total
Governor
Attorney General
Auditor
Secretary of State
U.S. Senator
21,234 2,000
U.S. House District 1 12,401 1,000
State House District 1A 1,384 500

In addition to the Affidavit of Candidacy and nominating petition, a minor party or independent candidate is liable for the same filing fee as a major party candidate. A nominating petition may be used in lieu of paying the filing fee, but the petition must include a prominent statement informing signers that the petition will be used in this way.[12][14]

Candidates must file between the 84th day preceding the primary election and the 70th day preceding the primary. Candidates for federal office must file with the Secretary of State. Candidates for state-level office may file with the county auditor of their county of residence or the Secretary of State.[13][14]

For write-in candidates

Write-in candidates must file a written request in order to have their votes tallied. Such requests must be filed no later than the seventh day before the general election. Write-in candidates for federal office must submit their requests to the Secretary of State. Write-in candidates for state-level office may submit requests to the county auditor of their county of residence or the Secretary of State.[13]

Petition requirements

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process to gain access to the ballot. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators in Minnesota.

Sample forms for all petitions are available through the Secretary of State's website.

General requirements

All petitions must be prepared in accordance with the following:[16]

  • Petitions must be printed on paper measuring no greater than 8.5 inches wide by 14 inches long. The signer's oath and the signature lines must appear on the same side of the paper.
  • Petition language must be printed in type no smaller than 10-point.
  • Each page of a petition must contain a short title describing the petition's purpose.
    • Each page of a nominating petition or a petition submitted in lieu of filing fees must state the office being sought, the candidate's name and residential address, and the candidate's political party or political principle expressed in no more than three words (the word "nonpartisan" may not be used, but the word "independent" may be).[17][18]
    • Each page of a major party qualification petition must include the following statement: "We, the undersigned members of the [name of political party], request the Secretary of State to designate a place on the [year] state partisan primary election ballot for that party as a major political party in Minnesota."[19]
    • Each page of a minor party qualification petition must include the following statement: "We, the undersigned members of the [name of political party], request the Secretary of State to qualify that party as a minor political party in Minnesota beginning with the [year] state general election.[20]
  • Each page of a petition must contain a signer's oath printed in boldface type no smaller than 12-point. If an oath is not specified by statute, the following must be used: "I swear (or affirm) that I know the contents and purpose of this petition and that I signed this petition only once and of my own free will."
    • Nominating petitions must include the following oath: "I solemnly swear (or affirm) that I know the contents and purpose of this petition, that I do not intend to vote at the primary election for the office for which this nominating petition is made, and that I signed the petition of my own free will."[17][18]
  • Each page of a petition must include the following statement immediately above the signature lines: "All information must be filled in by person(s) signing the petition unless disability prevents the person(s) from doing so."
  • Each page of a petition must include no more than 10 signature lines. Signature lines must be consecutively numbered and must include space for inclusion of the date of the signature, the signer's year of birth, printed name, and residential address.
  • Each page of a petition must include the following statement: "All information on this petition is subject to public inspection."

Signature requirements

The person signing any petition must complete the signature date, name, year of birth, and residential address lines on the petition. A person who is physically unable to complete the petition fields may ask another person for assistance.[21]

Only individuals who are eligible to vote for the candidate being nominated may sign a nominating petition or a petition submitted in lieu of filing fees. Petitions may only be signed during the candidate filing period. Signatures do not have to be notarized or certified.[17][18][22]

Circulator requirements

The relevant statutes and administrative rules do not stipulate requirements that petition circulators must meet.[23]

Campaign finance

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Chapter 10A. Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure"

Campaign finance requirements

If a candidate anticipates receiving more than $750 from supporters or intends to receive public money, he or she must form a campaign committee. All campaign financial transactions must be made through the committee -- the candidate can neither accept contributions nor make expenditures for the campaign outside of the committee.[24]

All committees must have a chair and a treasurer, each of whom is chosen by the candidate. The candidate may, at his or her discretion, serve as the committee chair and/or treasurer. The treasurer is the key financial agent in the committee and is responsible for keeping records, reconciling the campaign's books, and meeting reporting requirements. The committee must keep a separate bank account, over which the treasurer must have signing authority. Any contributions must be deposited into this account within 10 business days of receipt.[24]

The campaign committee must register with the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board. This registration includes basic information, such as the names and addresses of the candidate, the committee, the committee's officers, and the committee's bank account. The registration must be signed by the candidate or the treasurer and submitted (in person, or by mail, fax or email) to the Board within 14 days after receiving more than $750 in contributions or making more than $750 in expenditures.[24]

Reporting requirements

Campaign committees are required to file regular campaign finance disclosure reports with the Campaign Finance and Disclosure Board. Each report covers the time period from the beginning of the year to the date of the report. The beginning balance on every report is always the ending balance from the last report. Reports must be filed every year until the committee closes, even if the committee does not collect or spend any money during the year. Reports must be filed electronically (the Board can make exceptions if the committee demonstrates that is has a good reason for not filing electronically). The Board offers free software for record keeping and reporting purposes, which can be downloaded here. Using the provided software, committees can automatically generate their reports based on the receipts and expenditures they enter.[24]

For reporting purposes, contribution and expenditure amounts are the total of all contributions received from the same donor or expenditures made to the same vendor or supplier. Contributions from donors who each give $200 or less (including both cash and in-kind contributions) do not need to be itemized, but should be reported as aggregate totals. Contributions from one donor of more than $200 must be reported individually. The donor's name, address, and employer or occupation must be noted, as well as the date and amount of the contribution. For vendors or suppliers to whom expenditures of $200 or less are made, the total amount should be reported (itemization is not necessary). For vendors or suppliers to whom expenditures of more than $200 are made, the vendor's name and address must be noted along with expenditure details (date and amount of payment, and a description of the item or service purchased).[24]

A committee cannot stop operating until it has $100 or less in cash and property and has submitted a termination report to the Board. A committee can terminate its registration with the Board even if it has unpaid debts, though the committee, candidate, or officers will remain liable for the unpaid debts.[24]

In an election year, candidates for state legislative office are required to file three separate reports with the Board:[25]

State legislative reporting schedule for 2014
Report type Closing date of statement Due date
Pre-primary report July 21, 2014 July 28, 2014
Pre-general report October 20, 2014 October 27, 2014
Year-end report December 31, 2014 February 2, 2015

In an election year, candidates for constitutional office (e.g., Governor, Secretary of State, etc.) must file six separate reports with the Board:[26]

Constitutional officer reporting schedule for 2014
Report type Closing date of statement Due date
First quarter report March 31, 2014 April 14, 2014
Second quarter report May 31, 2014 June 16, 2014
Pre-primary report July 21, 2014 July 28, 2014
42nd day pre-general report September 16, 2014 September 23, 2014
10th day pre-general report October 20, 2014 October 27, 2014
Year-end report December 31, 2014 February 2, 2015

In a non-election year, candidates are only required to file one report for the entire year, due on January 31 of the following year.[24]

For certain transactions that occur between the last pre-primary or pre-general report and the date of the election, special notice must be made to the Board. The Board will determine the amounts that trigger notice requirement for each office after the 2014 legislative session. The notice is due within 24 hours if the committee files electronically or by the next business day if the committee files in person.[24]

Contribution limits

Contribution limits are applied to election and non-election segments. Election segments are two-year periods that end on December 31 of an election year. Any other two-year period is called a non-election segment. Contribution limits are higher in an election segment than they are in a non-election segment. For an office with a four-year term, the non-election segment and the election segment together make up the election cycle for that office. Contribution limits also vary according to the type of donor and the type of contributor. Contribution limits apply both to one-time contributions and to the total amount given by one person or group over the course of each two-year segment.[24]

The table below summarizes the contribution limits that apply to individuals, political committees and funds. The uppermost row indicates the type of election segment, while the leftmost column indicates the contribution recipient.[24][27] [28]

Individual, political committee and fund contribution limits in Minnesota
Election segment Non-election segment
Governor and Lieutenant Governor $4,000 $2,000
Attorney General $2,500 $1,500
Secretary of State
Auditor
$2,000 $1,000
State Senate $1,000 $1,000
State House $1,000 N/A

On May 19, 2014, United States District Court Judge Donovan W. Frank struck down a campaign finance provision prohibiting candidates from receiving large contributions after having already received a certain number of large contributions. For example, under the law in question, the first 12 donors to a state legislative candidate could contribute up to $1,000, but subsequent donors could only contribute a maximum of $500. With Frank's ruling, this prohibition no longer applies.[29][30]

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office may require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

  • Minnesota Secretary of State
Why: To file requisite paperwork for federal, state and judicial offices
180 State Office Building
100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Saint Paul, MN 55155-1299
Telephone: 651.215.1440
Toll Free: 1.877.600.VOTE (8683)
Fax: 651.296.9073
Email: elections.dept@state.mn.us
http://www.sos.state.mn.us/
  • Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board
Why: To file campaign finance reports
190 Centennial Office Building
658 Cedar Street
St. Paul, Minnesota 55155-1603
Telephone: 651-539-1180
Toll Free: (651) 539-1188
Fax: (651) 539-1196
Email: cf.board@state.mn.us
http://www.cfboard.state.mn.us/

Counties

See also: Counties in Minnesota

A candidate may file a number of documents with the county elections office in the county he or she resides in. Individual county contact information can be found below. In the table below, if a piece of information does not exist, it is because it could not be found for this municipality. To provide information for the table below, please email us.

Minnesota county contact information
County Email Phone Secondary phone Fax Website Physical address Mailing address
Aitkin County Auditor kpeysar@co.aitkin.mn.us 218-927-7354 218-927-7324 link 209 2nd St NW, Room 202, Aitkin, MN 56431
Anoka County Auditor proptax@co.anoka.mn.us 763-323-5400 link Anoka County Government Center, 2100 3rd Avenue, Anoka, MN 55303
Becker County Auditor rltange@co.becker.mn.us 218-846-7311 218-846-7257 link 915 Lake Ave, Detroit Lakes, MN 56501
Beltrami County Auditor jodee.treat@co.beltrami.mn.us 218-333-4175 218-333-4246 link County Administration Building, 701 Minnesota Ave. NW Suite 220, Bemidji, MN 56601
Benton County Auditor karri.thorsten@co.benton.mn.us (320) 968-5006 (320) 968-5337 link 531 Dewey Street, Foley, MN 56329 P.O. Box 129, Foley, MN 56329
Big Stone County Auditor Michelle.Knutson@co.big-stone.mn.us (320) 839-6366 (320) 839-6370 link 20 SE Second St, Suite 103, Ortonville, MN 56278
Blue Earth County Auditor/Elections Department licensecenterinfo@blueearthcounty.gov (507) 304-4341 link Blue Earth County Government Center, 410 S. Fifth St., Mankato, MN 56001
Brown County Minnesota Auditor auditor1@co.brown.mn.us (507) 233-6613 (507) 359-1430 link 14 S State St, New Ulm, MN 56073
Carlton County Auditor 218-384-9127 218-384-9116 link County Courthouse, Room 205, 301 Walnut Avenue, Carlton, MN 55718
Carver County Auditor/Taxpayer Services Department elections@co.carver.mn.us (952) 361-1910 (952) 361-1566 link 600 East 4th Street, Chaska, MN 55318-2102
Cass County Auditor sharon.k.anderson@co.cass.mn.us 218-547-7275 218-547-7278 link Courthouse Annex, 2nd Floor, 303 Minnesota Avenue W, PO Box 3000, Walker, MN 56484-3000
Chippewa County Auditor 320-269-7447 320-269-7412 link 629 North Eleventh Street, Montevideo, MN 56265
Chisago County Auditor auditor@co.chisago.mn.us 651-213-8500 651-213-8510 link Dennis J Freed, County Auditor, 313 N Main St Room 271, Center City MN 55012-7656
Clay County Auditor auditor@co.clay.mn.us 218.299.5006 218.299.5195 link Clay County Courthouse, 2nd Floor, 807 11th Street North, Moorhead, MN 56560
Clearwater County Auditor allen.paulson@co.clearwater.mn.us 218.694.6520 218.694.6244 link Courthouse, Second Floor, 213 Main Avenue North, Dept. 202, Bagley, MN 56621-8304
Cook County Auditor braidy.powers@co.cook.mn.us (218)387-3640 218-387-3043 link Cook County Courthouse, 411 W. 2nd Street, Grand Marais, MN 55604
Cottonwood County Auditor jan.h.johnson@co.cottonwood.mn.us 507-831-1342 507-831-1905 507-831-4553 link 900 3rd Ave., Windom, MN 56101
Crow Wing County Auditor laureen.borden@co.crow-wing.mn.us (218) 824-1045 (218) 824-1303 (218) 824-1046 link Historic Courthouse, 326 Laurel St., Suite 22, Brainerd, MN 56401
Dakota County Auditor 651-438-4305 651-438-4418 link Administration Center, 1590 Highway 55, Hastings, MN 55033-2372​
Dodge County Auditor dodge.admin@co.dodge.mn.us (507) 635-6239 (507) 635-6265 link Dodge County Courthouse, 22 6th Street East, Dept. 31, Mantorville, MN 55955-2200
Douglas County Auditor vicki.doehling@mail.co.douglas.mn.us 320-762-3077 320-762-2389 link 305 8th Ave W, Alexandria MN 56308
Faribault County Auditor john.thompson@co.faribault.mn.us 507-526-6211 507-526-6290 link 412 N Nicollet St, Blue Earth, MN 56013
Fillmore County Auditor sboelter@co.fillmore.mn.us (507) 765-3811 (507) 765-4701 (507) 765-2662 link 101 Fillmore Street, Preston, MN 55965 PO Box 466, Preston, MN 55965
Freeborn County Auditor pat.martinson@co.freeborn.mn.us (507) 377-5121. (507) 377-5175. link 411 South Broadway Avenue, Albert Lea, MN 56007 PO Box 1147, Albert Lea, MN 56007
Goodhue County Auditor 651-385-3032 651-385-3196 link 509 W. 5th Street, Red Wing, MN 55066
Grant County Auditor auditor@co.grant.mn.us 218-685-8236 218-685-4521 link 10 2nd Street NE, Elbow Lake, MN 56531-4400
Hennepin County Auditor hc.vote@co.hennepin.mn.us 612-348-5151 612-348-2151 link 012 PSL Level Government Center, 300 South 6th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55487
Houston County Auditor char.meiners@co.houston.mn.us (507) 725-5803 (507) 725-2647 304 S. Marsahll Street, Caledonia, MN 55921
Hubbard County Auditor pheeren@co.hubbard.mn.us 218-732-3196 Hubbard County Courthouse, 301 Court Ave., Park Rapids, MN 56470
Isanti County Auditor terry.treichel@co.isanti.mn.us 763-689-1644 763-689-8210 Isanti County Government Center, 555 18th Avenue S.W., Cambridge, MN 55008
Itasca County Auditor jeff.walker@co.itasca.mn.us (218) 327-2860 (218) 327-7426 123 NE 4th St. Grand Rapids MN 55744-2600
Jackson County Auditor kevin.nordquist@co.jackson.mn.us (507) 847-2763 405 4th St, Jackson MN 56143
Kanabec County Auditor (320) 679-6430 (320) 679-6431 18 Vine St N, Ste 261A, Mora, MN 55051-1384
Kandiyohi County Auditor 320-231-6202 link 400 Benson Avenue SW, Willmar, MN 56201
Kittson County Auditor (218) 843-2655 link 410 5th St. SE., Suite 214. Hallock, MN
Koochiching County Auditor bob.peterson@co.koochiching.mn.us 218 283-1112 link Koochiching County Courthouse, 715 Fourth Street International Falls, Minnesota 56649
La Qui Parle County Auditor auditor-treasurer@lqpco.com (320) 598-7444 (320) 598-3125 link Lac qui Parle County Courthouse, 600 West 6th Street,Madison, MN 56256
Lake County Auditor elections@co.lake.mn.us 218-834-8473 218-834-8358 link 601 Third Avenue, Two Harbors, MN 55616
Lake of Woods County Auditor mark_h@co.lake-of-the-woods.mn.us 218-634-2836 link 206 8th Ave SE Suite #260, Baudette, MN 56623
Le Sueur County Auditor (507) 357-2251 link Le Sueur County Treasurer, 88 South Park Ave., Le Center, MN 56057
Lincoln County Auditor auditor@co.lincoln.mn.us 507-694-1529 507-694-1198 link Lincoln County Courthouse, 319 N. Rebecca, PO Box 29, Ivanhoe, MN 56142
Lyon County Auditor E.J.Moberg@co.lyon.mn.us (507) 537-6724 (507) 537-6091 link 607 West Main Street, Marshall, MN 56258
McLeod County Auditor cindy.schultz@co.mcleod.mn.us 320-864-1260 320-864-3268 link Cindy Schultz, Auditor-Treasurer, 2391 Hennepin Ave N, Glencoe, MN 55336
Mahnomen County Auditor frank.thompson@co.mahnomen.mn.us 218-935-5669 218-936-5656 link PO Box 379, Mahnomen MN 56557
Marshall County Audtior (218) 745-4851 link 208 E. Colvin Ave., Suite 11 Warren MN 56762
Martin County Auditor james.forshee@co.martin.mn.us 507-238-3211 507-238-3266 link 201 Lake Avenue Fairmont, MN 56031
Meeker County Auditor barb.loch@co.meeker.mn.us 320-693-5212 320-693-5217 link Barbara Loch, Courthouse, Level 4, 325 Sibley Avenue North, Litchfield, MN 55355
Mille Lacs County Auditor phil.thompson@co.mille-lacs.mn.us 320-983-8310 888-840-8304 320-983-8336 link Historic Courthouse, 1st floor, 635 2nd Street SE, Milaca, MN 56353
Morrison County Auditor russn@co.morrison.mn.us 320-632-0130 320-632-0137 320-632-0139 link Upper Level - Administration Building, Morrison County Government Center, 213 - 1st Avenue SE, Little Falls, MN 56345
Mower County Auditor dougg@co.mower.mn.us (507) 437-9536 (507) 434-2646 link 201 1st Street NE, Austin MN 55912
Murray County Auditor hwinter@co.murray.mn.us 507-836-1152 (507)-836-6148 (507) 836-6114 link 2500 28th Street, PO Box 57, Slayton, MN 56172
Nicollet County Auditor info@co.nicollet.mn.us 507-934-0348 link Government Center, Second Floor, 501 South Minnesota Ave., St Peter, MN 56082
Nobles County Auditor bvanhove@co.nobles.mn.us (507) 295-5258 (507) 372-8390 link 315 Tenth St., PO Box 757, Worthington, MN 56187
Norman County Auditor (218) 784-5471 link 16 3rd Ave. E., PO Box 266 Ada,MN 56510
Olmsted County Property, Records & Licensing propertyweb@co.olmsted.mn.us 507 328-7670 507 328-7635 507 328-7964 link 151 4th St SE, Rochester, MN 55904
Otter Tail County Auditor (218) 998-8030 link Government Services Center, 510 Fir Ave W Fergus Falls, MN 56537
Pennington County Auditor (218) 683-7000 link 1st and Main, Box 616 Thief River Falls,MN 56701
Pine County Auditor 320-591-1670 800-450-7463 ext. 1670 link Cathy J. Clemmer, Pine County Auditor-Treasurer, 635 Northridge Dr. NW, Suite 240, Pine City, MN 55063
Pipestone County Auditor tyler.reisch@co.pipestone.mn.us 507-825-6740 507-825-6741 link Tyler Reisch, County Auditor, 416 S. Hiawatha Ave, Pipestone, MN 56164
Polk County Auditor (218) 281-2554 link 612 N. Broadway, Suite 207 Crookston,MN 56716
Pope County Auditor GroupWebAuditor-Treasurer@co.pope.mn.us (320)634-7706 (320) 634-5705 (320) 634-3087 link 130 East Minnesota Avenue, Glenwood, MN 56334
Ramsey County Elections elections@co.ramsey.mn.us 651-266-2171 651-266-2177 link 90 West Plato Boulevard, St. Paul, MN
Red Lake County Auditor (218) 253-2598 link County Courthouse Red Lake Falls, MN 56750 PO Box 367 Red Lake Falls, MN 56750
Redwood County Auditor jean_p@co.redwood.mn.us 507-637-4013 507-637-4072 link Redwood County Government Center, 403 South Mill Street, Redwood Falls, MN 56283 P.O. Box 130, Redwood Falls, MN 56283
Renville County Auditor larry_j@co.renville.mn.us 320-523-2071 320-523-3679 link Renville County Courthouse, 500 E. DePue Ave. - Ste 202, Olivia, MN 56277-3005
Rice County Auditor RCAuditor@co.rice.mn.us 507-332-6104 507-645-9576 link 320 3rd Street NW, Faribault, MN 55021
Rock County Auditor ashley.kurtz@co.rock.mn.us 507-283-5060 507-283-1343 link 204 E. Brown Street, Luverne, MN 56156 PO Box 509, Luverne, MN 56156
Roseau County Auditor martie@co.roseau.mn.us 218-463-1282 218-463-4283 link Martha (Martie) Monsrud, 606 5th Ave SW, Room 160, Roseau, Minnesota 56751
St. Louis County Auditor dicklichd@stlouiscountymn.gov 218-726-2380 218-726-2380 218-725-5060 link 100 N 5th Ave W, Duluth, MN 55802
Scott County Elections (952) 496-8560 (952) 496-8161 (952) 496-8174 link Government Center Contact, 200 Fourth Ave, West Shakopee, MN 55379
Sherburne County Auditor elections@co.sherburne.mn.us 763-765-4351 800-438-0576 763-765-4400 link Sherburne County Govt Center, 13880 Business Center Dr. NW, Elk River, MN 55330-1692
Sibley County Auditor elections@co.sibley.mn.us (507) 237-4070 link 400 Court Avenue, PO Box 171, Gaylord, MN 55334
Stearns County Auditor auditor@co.stearns.mn.us 320-656-3900 320-656-3916 link 705 Courthouse Square Room 148, St. Cloud, MN 56303-4701
Steele County Auditor auditor@co.steele.mn.us 507-444-7410 507-444-7470 link 630 Florence Ave, Owatonna, MN 55060-2913
Stevens County Auditor neilwiese@co.stevens.mn.us (320) 208-6570 link 400 Colorado Ave, Suite 303, Morris, MN 56267
Swift County Auditor kim.saterbak@co.swift.mn.us (320) 843-4069 (320) 843-2275 link Courthouse, 301 14th Street N, Benson, MN 56215 P.O. Box 288, Benson, MN 56215
Todd County Auditor karen.busch@co.todd.mn.us (320) 732-4473 link 215 1st Avenue South, Suite 201, Long Prairie, MN 56347
Traverse County Auditor kit.johnson@co.traverse.mn.us (320) 563-4242 (320) 563-4616 (320) 563-4424 link 702 2nd Ave N Wheaton, MN 56296 P. O. Box 428, Wheaton, MN 56296
Wabasha County Auditor danderson@co.wabasha.mn.us (651)-565-2648 (651)-565-2774 link 625 Jefferson Avenue, Wabasha, MN 55981
Wadena County Auditor judy.taves@co.wadena.mn.us 218-631-7784 link 415 Jefferson St So, Wadena, MN 56482
Waseca County Auditor joyce.oliver@co.waseca.mn.us (507) 835-0610 (507) 835-0633 link 307 N. State St., Waseca, MN 56093
Washington County Elections Division elections@co.washington.mn.us 651-430-6175 link 14949 62nd Street N., Stillwater, MN 55082
Watonwan County Auditor Don.Kuhlman@co.watonwan.mn.us (507) 375-1210 (507) 375-3547 link Watonwan County Courthouse, 710 Second Ave. S., St. James, MN 56081 P.O. Box 518, St. James, MN 56081
Wilkin County Auditor wbezenek@co.wilkin.mn.us 218-643-7165 218-643-7169 link 1st Floor, Courthouse, 300 5th St. S., Breckenridge, MN P.O. Box 409, Breckenridge, MN 56520-0409
Winona County Auditor pmoga@co.winona.mn.us (507) 457-8830 (507) 457-6454 link 177 Main Street, Winona, MN 55987
Wright County Auditor (763) 682-7578 (763) 682-7873 link 10 - 2nd Street NW, Room 230, Buffalo, MN 55313-1195
Yellow Medicine County 320-564-3132 320-564-3670 link 415 9th Ave., Suite 102, Granite Falls, MN 56241

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits and States with gubernatorial term limits

Minnesota does not place term limits on state executives.

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

Minnesota does not place term limits on state legislators.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Minnesota and List of United States Senators from Minnesota

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Minnesota:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Minnesota
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 2 5 7
     Republican Party 0 3 3
TOTALS as of July 2014 2 8 10

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Minnesota:

Senate

Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 39
     Republican Party 28
Total 67

House

Party As of July 2014
     Democratic Party 73
     Republican Party 61
Total 134

See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

News

Other information

References

  1. Minnesota Secretary of State, "Filing Periods," accessed November 13, 2013
  2. Ballotpedia email with Minnesota Office of the Secretary of State on September 9, 2013
  3. Minnesota Secretary of State, "Minnesota's Major and Minor Political Parties," accessed November 13, 2013
  4. 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "204B.07 Nominating Petitions," accessed March 3, 2014
  5. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 6.11 6.12 6.13 6.14 6.15 6.16 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 200.02," accessed March 3, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Minnesota Secretary of State, "2010 Election Results - Canvassing Board Report," accessed March 3, 2014
  8. 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 202A.12," accessed March 3, 2014
  9. 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 204B.03," accessed March 3, 2014
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 204B.06," accessed March 4, 2014
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 Minnesota Secretary of State, "Guide for Major Party or Nonpartisan Candidates," accessed March 4, 2014
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 204B.11," accessed March 4, 2014
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 204B.09," accessed March 4, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Minnesota Secretary of State, "Guide for Minor Party or Independent Candidates," accessed March 4, 2014
  15. 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 204B.08," accessed March 4, 2014
  16. Minnesota Administrative Rules, "Section 8205.1010," accessed March 4, 2014
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "204B.07 Nominating Petitions," accessed March 3, 2014
  18. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named indieguide
  19. Minnesota Secretary of State, "Major Political Party Recognition Petition," accessed March 4, 2014
  20. Minnesota Secretary of State, "Minor Political Party Recognition Petition," accessed March 4, 2014
  21. Minnesota Administrative Rules, "Section 8205.1030," accessed March 4, 2014
  22. 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 204B.08," accessed March 4, 2014
  23. Minnesota Administrative Rules, "Section 8205.1020," accessed March 4, 2014
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 24.5 24.6 24.7 24.8 24.9 Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, "Legislative and Constitutional Office Candidate Handbook," accessed March 4, 2014
  25. Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, "2014 Disclosure Calendar - House of Representatives Candidates and District Court Judicial Candidates," accessed March 4, 2014
  26. Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board, "2014 Disclosure Calendar - Constitutional Officer Candidates and Appellate Court Judicial Candidates," accessed March 4, 2014
  27. National Conference of State Legislatures, "State Limits on Contributions to Candidates," updated October 2013
  28. 2013 Minnesota Statutes, "Section 10A.27," accessed March 4, 2014
  29. Ballot Access News, "U.S. District Court Enjoins Minnesota Campaign Contribution Limit," May 19, 2014
  30. United States District Court, District of Minnesota, "Civil No. 14-1016 (DWF/JSM)," May 19, 2014