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Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Nevada

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This page contains extensive information about ballot access requirements for state and federal candidates running for elected office in the state of Nevada. Offices included are:

This page contains information on specific filing dates for each election year, how to become a candidate, how to create a political party, campaign finance requirements, state agency contacts involved in the election process, and term limits in Nevada. Information on running for election as a presidential candidate or for county and municipal offices is not included.

Note: If you have any questions or comments about this page, email us.

Year-specific dates

2015

See also: Nevada elections, 2015

There are no regularly scheduled state executive, state legislative or congressional elections in Nevada in 2015.

2014


Political parties

See also: List of political parties in the United States

As of February 2015, there were four recognized political parties in Nevada. In order to be recognized by the state, a political party must fulfill certain requirements, which are outlined below in "Process to establish a political party."[8][9]

Party Website link By-laws/platform link
Republican http://www.nevadagop.org/ Party by-laws
Democratic http://www.nvdems.com/ Party by-laws
Libertarian https://lpnevada.org/
Independent American http://www.iapn.org/ Party platform

In some states, a candidate may choose to have a label other than that of an officially recognized party appear alongside his or her name on the ballot. Such labels are called political party designations. A political party designation would be used when a candidate qualifies as an independent, but prefers to use a different label. Nevada does not allow candidates to identify in this way. A total of 25 states allow candidates to use political party designations in non-presidential elections.[3]

The 11 states listed below (and Washington, D.C.) do not provide a process for political organizations to gain qualified status in advance of an election. Instead, in these states, an aspirant party must first field candidates using party designations. If the candidate or candidates win the requisite votes, the organization may then be recognized as an official political party. In these states, a political party can be formed only if the candidate in the general election obtains a specific number of votes. The number of votes required and type of race vary from state to state. Details can be found on the state-specific requirements pages.[10]

Process to establish a political party

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Title 24, Chapter 293 of the Nevada Revised Statutes

Qualifying a minor party

There are four steps a political entity must take to qualify as a minor party in Nevada.

1) File a certificate of existence

The first step is to file a certificate of existence with the Nevada Secretary of State along with a copy of the minor party's constitution or bylaws.

  • The certificate of existence must include the following:
    1. The name of the political party
    2. The names of its officers
    3. The names of its executive committee members
    4. The name of the person authorized to file the list of the party's candidates with the Nevada Secretary of State[5][11]
  • The party's constitution or bylaws must provide a procedure to nominate candidates. Only one candidate may be nominated per office.
  • Any changes to the information provided on the original certificate of existence must be filed on an amended certificate of existence within five days of the change.[5][11]

2) Petition for qualification

The second step is for the minor party to prove they have voter support. This is done by circulating a petition to collect registered voters' signatures equal in number to 1 percent of the total votes cast at the last general election for United States Representative in all four districts of the state. In order to qualify in this manner:

  1. A copy of this qualifying petition must be filed with the Nevada Secretary of State before it can be circulated.
  2. The petition must be verified by the county clerk or county registrar of voters before it can be submitted to the Nevada Secretary of State. It must be filed with the secretary of state by the third Friday in May preceding the general election and must be turned into the counties for verification 25 business days prior to that deadline.[5][12][13]

3) Submit a list of candidates

The third step for a minor party to qualify is to file a list of candidates with the Nevada Secretary of State for the general election ballot. This list must be signed in the presence of a notary public and filed by the person designated to do so on the certificate of existence during the candidate filing period. Minor party candidates cannot file until this list is submitted.[5][14]

If a minor party does not file a list of candidates, the party must file a notice of continued existence with the Nevada Secretary of State by the second Friday in August before the general election. If this is not filed, the minor party will no longer be recognized by the state.[5][11]

4) Maintain party status

A minor party may maintain their party status in one of two ways:

  • If at the previous general election, the minor party’s candidate received 1 percent or more of the total votes cast for United States Representative, in any one of the four districts in the state.[5][12]
  • If 1 percent of the total number of registered voters in Nevada designated affiliation with the minor party on their voter registration applications as of January 1 preceding a primary election.[5][12]

If either of these occurs, the minor party will not have to submit a petition to gain ballot access in the next general election.[5]

Qualifying a major party

The process to qualify a major party is very similar to qualifying as a minor party. A certificate of existence must be filed with the party's constitution or bylaws, and the major party has two ways of obtaining ballot access:[15]

  • If 10 percent or more of registered voters have affiliated with the major party on the voter registration applications by January 1 preceding the primary election.
  • If the major party files a petition containing registered voters' signatures equal to at least 10 percent or more of the total number of votes cast at the last general election for United States Representative with the Nevada Secretary of State.

Once a major party has been qualified, it is allowed to hold conventions each year to adopt party platforms and elect members to a state central committee. Major parties may adopt their own rules on how to establish and maintain these annual conventions as well as how they will elect party officials. The state only requires that any delegates elected to vote at a major party convention be a registered voter in the corresponding county or district.[16][17]

Example of requirements

For an example of how many signatures are required to qualify a major or minor party by petition, look to the table below.[5]

Votes cast in 2012 for United States Representative Signatures needed for a major party to gain ballot access in 2014 Signatures needed for a minor party to gain ballot access in 2014
973,742 97,375 9,738

For an example of how many voters need to affiliate with a major or minor party for it to qualify for ballot access, look to the table below.

Number of registered voters as of January 2014 Number of voters needed to affiliate with the major party by January 1, 2014 Number of voters needed to affiliate with the minor party by January 1, 2014
1,414,350[18] 141,435 14,144

Process to become a candidate

Figure 1: This is the Declaration of Candidacy for Partisan Office for the state of Nevada.

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Title 24, Chapter 293 of the Nevada Revised Statutes

A candidate in Nevada may access the ballot in one of three ways: as a major party candidate, as a minor party candidate or as an independent candidate. Write-in candidates are not permitted in this state. Voters can only cast a vote for candidates whose names appear on the ballot.[19]

Major party candidates

A major party candidate must have been affiliated with his or her party by December 31 of the year preceding the election. If a candidate changes his or her affiliation after that date, he or she can no longer run as a major party candidate.[20]

Major party candidates candidates are nominated at the primary election. There are two ways in which a major party candidate may be placed on the primary election ballot:[21]

  • by filing a Declaration of Candidacy and paying the filing fee during the candidate filing period, which begins on the first Monday in March and ends on the second Friday in March following that Monday; the Declaration of Candidacy must include:[22]
    • the residential address of the candidate, which must be in the appropriate district of the state corresponding to the office sought
    • a copy of a government-issued photo ID, a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck or document issued by a government entity in order to prove the residence address listed on the Declaration of Candidacy.
    • the candidate's Social Security number, license number or state identification number
  • by having 10 or more registered voters file a Certificate of Candidacy on behalf of any registered voter they wish to nominate as a candidate for their major party; this must be done no earlier than the first Monday in February and no later than the first Monday in March preceding the primary election (if nominated in this way, the candidate must file an Acceptance of Candidacy with the required filing fee during the candidate filing period)[22][4]

The filing fees mentioned above are calculated depending on the office the candidate seeks and can be paid in cash, cashier's check or certified check. Personal checks, campaign checks and credit cards are not acceptable forms of payment. The filing fees are detailed in the table below.[23][24][25]

Office sought Filing fee
U.S. Senator $500
U.S. Representative and Governor of Nevada $300
Nevada state executive offices other than governor $200
Nevada Senator and Nevada Assemblyman $100

All documents and filing fees must be filed with either the Nevada Secretary of State or a county clerk, depending on the office a candidate seeks. If a candidate seeks office in the United States Senate, state executive office, office in the U.S. House of Representatives or office in the Nevada State Legislature from a district comprising more than one county, that candidate must file with the Nevada Secretary of State. If a candidate seeks office in the U.S. House of Representatives or Nevada State Legislature from a district that is entirely comprised within one county, that candidate must file with the county clerk of that county.[26]

Minor party candidates

Minor parties must file a list of candidates with the Nevada Secretary of State before any minor party candidates can file. This list must be signed in the presence of a notary public by the party officer named to do so on the minor party's Certificate of Existence. The list must be filed during the candidate filing period, which starts on the first Monday in March and ends on the second Friday in March following that Monday.[5][14]

Once the candidate list has been submitted to the Nevada Secretary of State, a minor party candidate can file his or her Declaration of Candidacy and pay the required filing fee (shown above). These must be filed during the candidate filing period. If the candidate is seeking office in the U.S. House of Representatives or Nevada State Legislature in a district comprised within one county, he or she must file with the county clerk of that county. All other offices must file with the Nevada Secretary of State.[26][5][14]

Minor party candidates are not permitted to participate in the primary election. Minor parties nominate their candidates to be placed on the general election ballot and may have only one candidate for each office appearing on the ballot.[12]

Independent candidates

Independent candidates may run only in the general election. Independent candidates must petition to be placed on the ballot. This may be done in one of two ways:[2][3]

  • by submitting a petition containing signatures of registered voters equal in number to at least 1 percent of the total votes cast at the last general election for the same office the candidate seeks
  • by submitting a petition containing 250 signatures of registered voters if the candidate seeks statewide office or containing 100 registered voters' signatures if the candidate seeks any other office

Before circulating a petition, a candidate must file a copy of the petition with the Nevada Secretary of State any time after January 2 of the year of the election. The petition may be circulated as soon as the copy has been filed. The completed petition must then be filed with the counties where the petition was circulated in order to be verified. In order to have the petitions verified in time to file them during the candidate filing period, which starts on the first Monday in March and ends on the second Friday in March following that Monday, the petitions must be submitted to the counties 25 business days before the last day of the candidate filing period. A verified petition may then be filed with the Declaration of Candidacy and filing fee with the Nevada Secretary of State, unless the candidate is seeking office in a district comprised wholly within one county. Such candidates file all documents and fees with the county clerk of the appropriate county.[26][2][3]


Petition requirements

Figure 2: This is a sample page from an independent candidate petition for the state of Nevada.

In some cases, political parties and/or candidates may need to obtain signatures via the petition process in order to gain ballot access. This section outlines the laws and regulations pertaining to petitions and circulators.

Format requirements

In Nevada, petitions are used to qualify major and minor parties and independent candidates seeking ballot access. The rules regulating the use of these petitions is the same no matter the purpose of the petition.

  • Prior to circulation, copies of all petitions must be submitted to the Nevada Secretary of State for approval.[27] Once the petition has been approved, it can be signed by any registered voter in the appropriate district.[28] Registered voters who sign the petition may be affiliated with any political party without losing their party standing or the right to vote in their party's primary by signing the petition.[29]
  • All petitions must have the following format:[28][27]
    1. If longer than one page, the pages must be bound together and numbered sequentially.
    2. The name of the political party or candidate and the office sought must be displayed. If the petition is for a candidate, no more than one candidate's name may appear on the petition.
    3. The county the petition is being circulated in must be displayed, and only voters in that county may sign.
  • Once the petition has been completed, it must be submitted to the county or counties in which it was circulated so it can be verified. This must be done 25 business days before the last day the petition must be officially filed.[28][30][27]

Signature requirements

  1. Signers must include their name, address, including the county, and the date they signed.
  2. Each signature must be in ink. Any signature not in ink will be disregarded.
  3. The circulator of the petition must sign, before a notary public, an affidavit on the back of the petition verifying that all signatures were recorded in the circulator's presence and, to the best of the circulator's knowledge, were registered voters at the time of signing.[28][30]

Circulation requirements

Circulators of petitions are not required to be registered voters in Nevada. The statutes do not stipulate any requirements for circulators in Nevada.[28]

Campaign finance

DocumentIcon.jpg See statutes: Title 24, Chapter 294A of the Nevada Revised Statutes

This section covers all campaign finance reporting requirements for candidates running for state office in Nevada. Candidates running for federal office must file with the Federal Election Commission.

Definitions

The following is a list of definitions of terms used in campaign finance reporting in Nevada.

  • Contributions are gifts, loans, conveyances, deposits, payments, transfers or distributions of money or anything of value other than the services of a volunteer.[31]
  • Expenditures are any money paid to advocate the election or defeat of a clearly identified candidate or group of candidates, including any money paid for advertising or communication on television, radio, billboards, posters, newspapers or mail.[32]
  • Campaign expenses are all expenses incurred by a candidate for a campaign, including but not limited to: expenditures, office expenses, travel expenses, expenses related to volunteers, paid staff or consultants, polling expenses, special event expenses, filing fees and the disposal of unspent contributions.[33]
  • A candidate is an individual who does any of the following: files a Declaration of Candidacy, files an Acceptance of Candidacy, has his or her name appear on an official ballot in any election, or receives contributions in excess of $100.[34]

Reporting requirements

All campaign finance reports are filed electronically with the Nevada Secretary of State through a system called Aurora. The online filing system can be accessed here. Paper reports will only be accepted from a candidate who did not receive or spend more than $10,000 after becoming a candidate or from a candidate who filed an affidavit stating that he or she does not have the necessary technology to report electronically.[35][36][7]

Financial Disclosure Statement

Each candidate must electronically file a Financial Disclosure Statement (FDS) with the Nevada Secretary of State. This form is due 10 days after the last day of the candidate filing period, which is the second Friday after the first Monday in March. This form is also required from a candidate who has been successfully elected to public office. Once elected, he or she must file the FDS by January 15 of each year he or she holds office.[7]

Contributions and Expenses Reports

Contributions and Expenses Reports (C&E reports) are used to report all contributions and campaign expenses exceeding $100, including multiple contributions from a single contributor that cumulatively exceed $100, as well as all loans or written commitments. Contributions and campaign expenses of less than $100 must also be reported, but they can be reported as as aggregate total and do not need to be itemized.[35][36][37]

Within one week of receiving a contribution of $100 or more, a candidate must open a separate campaign account in a financial institution and must not commingle the money in that account with money collected for any other purpose.[7][38]

Each candidate must file five C&E reports during the year of the election in which he or she is running, even if he or she withdraws, receives no contributions or loses in the primary. However, if the candidate does withdraw or lose in the primary, he or she is allowed to file all required reports at one time, as long as his or her campaign balance stands at zero and the candidate files a Notice of Completion of Campaign form.[7][39]

An annual report is required from some candidates in additional to the five C&E reports. It is required only if a candidate receive $10,000 or more in contributions prior to the year of the election in which he or she is running. If such contributions are received, an annual report must be filed by January 15 of the year immediately following the year the contributions were received. If such contributions are received more than a year in advance of an election, an annual report must continue to be filed every January 15 until the year of the election arrives and any contribution or campaign expense in excess of $100 must be reported, along with the total of any other contribution or expenditure.[7][40]

The following table details the reporting timetable.[7][35]

Report Time period covered Due date
C&E Report 1 January 1 through 25 days before the primary election 21 days before the primary election
C&E Report 2 24 days before the primary election through 5 days before the primary election 4 days before the primary election
C&E Report 3 4 days before the primary election through 25 days before the general election 21 days before the general election
C&E Report 4 24 days before the general election through through 5 days before the general election 4 days before the general election
C&E Report 5 4 days before the general election through December 31 January 15

In order to file a Notice of Completion of Campaign form to close a campaign, campaign funds need to show a zero balance. If a candidate has an excess of campaign funds after an election, he or she may dispose of those funds in the following ways in order to officially close the campaign:[41]

  • return the excess funds to contributors
  • use the funds in the candidate's next election or for the payment of other public office expenses
  • contribute to other candidates' campaigns
  • contribute to a political party
  • donate to any tax-exempt nonprofit entity
  • donate to any government entity
Late fees

Late fees are applied to any report that is filed after its due date. Late fees are summarized in the table below.[7][42]

When the report is filed Fee applied
1 to 7 days late $25 per day
8 to 15 days late $50 per day
More than 15 days late $100 per day, up to a maximum of $5,000

Contribution limits

A person cannot make a contribution for any office exceeding $5,000 for the primary election and $5,000 for the general election, regardless of the number of candidates running for that office.[7][43]

In this case a person can mean:[44]

  • a natural person
  • any form of business or social organization
  • any nongovernmental entity, such as corporations, associations, trusts, unincorporated organizations, labor unions, committees for political action and political parties
  • a government, government agency or political subdivision of a government

No limits are applied to contributions made to groups, such as political parties, committees sponsored by political parties or committees for political action.[7]

Prohibited activities

A candidate cannot use money received for a campaign for his or her own personal use.[41]

No person can make a contribution in the name of another person, and accepting such a contribution is prohibited.[7][45]

Anonymous contributions exceeding $100 are prohibited. If a candidate receives such a contribution, he or she must deliver the money to the state treasurer or donate it to a nonprofit entity within 10 days of receiving it.[7][46]

Nevada state legislators, governors, lieutenant governors, governors-elect and lieutenant governors-elect cannot receive or solicit contributions during the period beginning 30 days before a regular session of the legislature and ending 30 days after. In the case of a special election, these same public officials cannot receive or solicit contributions beginning the day after a special election has been called and ending 15 days after its adjournment.[7][47]

Election-related agencies

See also: State election agencies

Candidates running for office will require some form of interaction with the following agencies:

Nevada Secretary of State

Why: This agency oversees candidate and political party filings, as well as campaign finance reporting.
101 North Carson Street, Suite 3
Carson City, NV 89701-3714
Telephone: 775.684.5705
Fax: 775.684.5718
Email: nvelect@sos.nv.gov
https://web.archive.org/web/2/http://sos.state.nv.us/elections/

Counties

See also: Counties in Nevada

County offices are used to verify petitions before they are filed with the Nevada Secretary of State. Some candidates may also have to file with their home counties. Individual county contact information can be found below. To provide information for this table, please email us.

Term limits

State executives

Portal:State Executive Officials
See also: State executives with term limits, States with gubernatorial term limits and Nevada state executive official elections, 2014

State executive term limits in Nevada are as follows:[48]

The following state executives were term-limited in 2014:

Name Party Office
Brian Krolicki Ends.png Republican Lieutenant Governor
Ross Miller Electiondot.png Democratic Secretary of State
Catherine Cortez Masto Electiondot.png Democratic Attorney General
Kim Wallin Electiondot.png Democratic Controller

State legislators

See also: State legislatures with term limits

Members of the Nevada State Legislature are term-limited to serve a total of 12 years, six terms in the Nevada State Assembly and three terms in the Nevada State Senate.[49]

Term limits were imposed on Nevada state legislators by a 1996 ballot initiative and took effect for those elected in 1998.

2014

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2014 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2014

A total of three state legislators were termed out in 2014.

Name Party Chamber District
Barbara Cegavske Ends.png Republican Senate District 8
William Horne Electiondot.png Democratic Assembly District 34
Thomas Grady Ends.png Republican Assembly District 38

2012

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2012 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2012

A total of five state legislators were termed out in 2012.

2010

See also: Impact of term limits on state senate elections in 2010 and Impact of term limits on state representative elections in 2010

A total of 14 state legislators were termed out in 2010.

Congressional partisanship

Portal:Congress
See also: List of United States Representatives from Nevada and List of United States Senators from Nevada

Here is the current partisan breakdown of the congressional members from Nevada:

Congressional Partisan Breakdown from Nevada
Party U.S. Senate U.S. House Total
     Democratic Party 1 1 2
     Republican Party 1 3 4
TOTALS as of March 2015 2 4 6

State legislative partisanship

Portal:State legislatures

Here is the current partisan breakdown of members of the state legislature of Nevada:

Senate

Party As of March 2015
     Democratic Party 10
     Republican Party 11
Total 21

House

Party As of March 2015
     Democratic Party 15
     Republican Party 27
Total 42


Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term "Nevada + ballot + access"

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

Nevada ballot access news feed

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See also

External links

Official state and federal links

Forms

Other information

References

  1. Nevada Secretary of State, "Election Information Guide 2013-2014," accessed November 18, 2013
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Nevada Secretary of State, "Independent Candidate Guide 2014," accessed February 10, 2014
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 200," accessed February 10, 2014
  4. 4.0 4.1 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 180," accessed February 10, 2014
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 Nevada Secretary of State, "Minor Party Qualification Guide 2013-2014," accessed February 10, 2014
  6. Nevada Secretary of State Website, "Campaign Finance Reporting Dates," accessed February 11, 2014
  7. 7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 7.06 7.07 7.08 7.09 7.10 7.11 7.12 Nevada Secretary of State, "Campaign Guide 2014," accessed February 11, 2014
  8. Phone call with the Office of the Nevada Secretary of State on September 13, 2013.
  9. Nevada Secretary of State, "January 2015 Voter Registration Statistics," accessed February 11, 2014
  10. E-mail consultation with ballot access expert Richard Winger in January 2014.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 171," accessed February 10, 2014
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 1715," accessed February 10, 2014
  13. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 172," accessed February 10, 2014
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 1725," accessed February 10, 2014
  15. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 128," accessed February 10, 2014
  16. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 150," accessed February 10, 2014
  17. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 155," accessed February 10, 2014
  18. Nevada Secretary of State, "January 2014 Voter Registration Statistics," Last Updated February 3, 2014
  19. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 270," accessed February 11, 2014
  20. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 176," accessed February 11, 2014
  21. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 175," accessed February 11, 2014
  22. 22.0 22.1 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 177," accessed February 11, 2014
  23. Nevada Secretary of State Website, "Filing for Non-Judicial Office," accessed February 11, 2014
  24. Nevada Secretary of State, "Election Information Guide 2013-2014," accessed November 18, 2013
  25. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 193," accessed February 11, 2014
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 185," accessed February 11, 2014
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 200," accessed February 10, 2014
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 28.3 28.4 Nevada Secretary of State, "Minor Party Qualification Guide 2013-2014," accessed February 10, 2014
  29. Nevada Secretary of State, "Independent Candidate Guide 2014," accessed February 10, 2014
  30. 30.0 30.1 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 293, Section 172," accessed February 10, 2014
  31. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 007," accessed February 12, 2014
  32. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 0075," accessed February 12, 2014
  33. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 0035," accessed February 12, 2014
  34. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 005," accessed February 12, 2014
  35. 35.0 35.1 35.2 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 120," accessed February 12, 2014
  36. 36.0 36.1 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 200," accessed February 12, 2014
  37. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 128," accessed February 12, 2014
  38. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 130," accessed February 12, 2014
  39. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 350," accessed February 12, 2014
  40. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 125," accessed February 12, 2014
  41. 41.0 41.1 Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 160," accessed February 12, 2014
  42. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 420," accessed February 12, 2014
  43. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 100," accessed February 12, 2014
  44. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 009," accessed February 12, 2014
  45. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 112," accessed February 12, 2014
  46. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 190," accessed February 12, 2014
  47. Nevada Revised Statutes, "Title 24, Chapter 294A, Section 300," accessed February 12, 2014
  48. Nevada Constitution, "Article V, Sections 3, 17 and 19," accessed November 18, 2013
  49. Nevada Constitution, "Article IV, Sections 3 and 4," accessed November 18, 2013