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Ellicott School Board recall, Colorado (2012)

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An effort to recall all five members of the Ellicott School District school board in El Paso County, Colorado, was launched in May 2012.[1] The five targeted members of the school board were President Ernest Hudson, Vice President MaryAnna Clemons, Bea Twiss, Cody Chambers and Dwight Hobbs Jr. Recall efforts against Twiss, Chambers, and Hobbs Jr. were dropped, but recall efforts against Hudson and Clemons persisted.[2] In August 2012, the recall effort against Hudson failed while Clemons resigned.[3] Two members of the Ellicott School District Board were recalled in November 2011.

Background

There were two separate recall committees. The first committee took out petitions against Hudson and Clemons while the second committee took out petitions against all five school board members. Marna Booker, Delbert Kraich and James Aikers were members of the first committee.[4] Gary Dahn, Michael Dahn and Charles Howarth were members of the second committee.[1]

Protests filed

Opponents of the recall accused the recall committee, which is called "Save Our Schools," of breaking election laws and giving false and misleading information. Recall organizers have also been accused of using irregular procedures to gather signatures. The recall committee denied the charges. A hearing in the matter took place in late August.[2] At the hearing, it was found that signatures on Hudson's petitions had been gathered illegally. However, it was found that signatures on Clemons' petitions had not been gathered illegally.[3]

Path to the ballot

Recall organizers had 60 days to gather signatures. The recall petition against Twiss required 262 signatures while the petitions against the other four recall targets required 369 signatures.[1] In August, recall organizers submitted 383 signatures on Hudson's petition and 386 signatures on Clemons' petition. If at least 369 signatures had been approved on each petition, a recall election would have taken place during the November general election.[2] After the signatures on Hudson's petitions were thrown out in court, the recall effort against him came to an end. Sufficient signatures were verified on Clemons' petitions, leading Clemons to resign her post on the school board.[3]

See also

References