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Ferndale City Headlee Amendment Override (May 2011)

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A Ferndale City Headlee Amendment Override measure was on the May 3, 2011 ballot in the city of Ferndale, which is in Oakland County.

This measure was approved

  • YES 1,848 (52.83%)Approveda
  • 'NO 1,650 (47.17%)[1]

This measure asked residents if they wanted to allow the city to be able to exceed the state set millage rate of 14 mills up to the maximum of 20 mills. The rate will be 3 mills for the first three years then 5.5 mills for one more year. The additional money will go towards expected budget shortfalls for the following years though city officials note that funding would still need to be cut for different programs and services. Though without approval of the override, the cuts would have been greater and would have put the city into a larger deficit.[2]

Text of measure

The question on the ballot:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Shall the City of Ferndale, County of Oakland, Michigan, be permitted to increase its authorized millage rate in 2011 for a term of five (5)years ending December 31, 2015, by an additional 5.4552 mills ($5.4552 per $1,000) on each dollar of the taxable value of all real and personal property in the City of Ferndale, which will restore to the City the Charter-authorized millage amount for general purposes has been reduced by Section 31 of Article IX of the State Constitution of 1963 all of which tax revenues would be disbursed to the City of Ferndale; provided that the City shall not be authorized to levy more than three (3) additional mills in 2011. The Charter-authorized millage amount has been reduced by required millage rollbacks in recent years to 14.5448. If approved, the initial three (3) mills authorized for levy would raise approximately $1,681,806 in 2011.[3]

See also

References