Florida Road Bonds, Amendment 4 (1965)

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The Florida Road Bonds Amendment, also known as Amendment 4, was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment in Florida which was defeated on the ballot on November 2, 1965.

This amendment sought to modify Article IX of the Florida Constitution to authorize $300,000,000 in bonds for the purpose of constructing and reconstructing major roads.[1]

Election results

Florida Amendment 4 (1965)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No424,43460.68%
Yes 275,016 39.32%

Unofficial election results via: Ocala Star-Banner (November 3, 1965)

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

NO. 4

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

TO ARTICLE IX

Road Bonds—Proposing an amendment to Article IX of the State Constitution by adding a section to be numbered by the Secretary of State authorizing the issuance of bonds not to exceed $300,000,000, without legislative approval, for the construction and reconstruction of primary roads into four or more lane highways and to pay fifty per cent of the right of way costs thereof; pledging certain tax funds; providing powers and duties of the State Board of Administration, the Florida Development Commission and the State Road Department.[2][3]

Constitutional changes

Path to the ballot

  • The amendment was placed on the ballot by Substitute Committee for Senate Joint Resolution 848 of 1965.
  • The amendment was approved by the Governor on June 23, 1965.
  • The amendment was filed with the Secretary of State on June 24, 1965.[1]

See also

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External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Florida Constitution Revision Commission, "Amendments, Election of 11-2-65"
  2. Ocala Star-Banner, "Voting Machine Sample Ballot," October 25, 1965
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.