Gilroy Unified School District bond proposition, Measure P (November 2008)

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A Gilroy Unified School District bond proposition, Measure P ballot question was on the November 4, 2008 ballot for voters in the Gilroy Unified School District in Santa Clara, California, where it was approved.

Measure P authorized the Gilroy Unified School District to borrow $150 million.

A 55 percent supermajority vote was required for approval.

Election results

Measure P
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 11,989 67.58%
No5,75232.42%
These final, certified, election results are from the Santa Clara County elections office.

Opposition

Opponents

The ballot arguments against Measure P were written by Mark A. Zappa, a Gilroy resident and member of the Silicon Valley Taxpayers Association.

Arguments against

The arguments in the official voter guide against Measure P said, "Citizens of Gilroy are again being asked to give an even larger part of their income to a school facility. The Gilroy Unified School District with its' marginal academic success seems to require more and more money, always more than is originally bonded for in previous and current projects. A bond is the worst way to pay for anything. It is like using your MasterCard to pay your VISA, with one big difference. When you die, so does your credit card bill, but with a bond, your children and your grandchildren will be paying for these bills for decades. With $4.00 per gallon gasoline, tumbling home values and out of control debt, it is a poor time to ask overtaxed and overburdened citizens' to pay another dime. Homes are being foreclosed on and families are struggling to keep roofs over their heads. The GUSD has a budget and should learn to live within it like we all do with our homes. If we don't have the money, we don't buy it. Why shouldn't that principle apply to school districts? The Gilroy Unified School District's $150,000,000 million dollar bond is just too much of an added burden for the citizens of Gilroy. No doubt this bond campaign will tug on your heartstrings with calls for earthquake safety and "for the children" motto's. There will no doubt be high profile and well healed community leaders lending their names and money to this campaign. If they have the resources, I suggest they privately fund the new high school. Now is not the time for yet another bond. Please vote no on the Gilroy Unified School District Bond. We and our future generations cannot afford it."

Ballot question

The question on the ballot:

MEASURE P: "For construction of Christopher High School, construct and modernize aging classroom, libraries, fire safety and security systems and school buildings for safe, secure and improved learning environments, upgrade electrical, heating, ventilation, roofing, plumbing, and technology systems and computer equipment, shall Gilroy Unified School District issue $150 million in bonds at legal interest rates, with mandatory audits, independent citizens' oversight, no funds for administrative salaries, and bond tax rates estimated to be lower than the combined existing tax rate?"[1]

See also

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