Itasca School District 10 Property Tax Limitation Increase Question (April 2013)

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An Itasca School District 10 Property Tax Limitation Increase proposition was defeated on the April 9, 2013 election ballot in DuPage County, which is in Illinois.

If approved, this measure would have authorized the Itasca School District to increase property taxes by 0.8466% above the limiting rate to 2.7523%.[1]

Election results

All Precincts:

SD 10 Tax Prop.
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No110759.84%
Yes 743 40.16%
These election results are from the DuPage County elections office

Text of measure

Language on the ballot:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Shall the limiting rate under the Property Tax Extension Limitation Law for Itasca School District Number 10, DuPage County,

Illinois, be increased by an additional amount equal to 0.8466% above the limiting rate for levy year 2011 and be equal to 2.7523% of the equalized assessed value of the taxable property therein for levy year 2013?

1.)The approximate amount of taxes extendable at the most recently extended limiting rate is $9,835,364 and the approximate amount of taxes extendable if the proposition is approved is $14,204,687.24.

2.)For the 2013 levy year the approximate amount of the additional tax extendable against property containing a single family residence and having a fair market value at the time of the referendum of $100,000 is estimated to be $282.20.

3.)If the proposition is approved, the aggregate extension for 2013 will be determined by the limiting rate set forth in the proposition, rather than the otherwise applicable limiting rate calculated under the provisions of the Property Tax Extension Limitation Law (commonly known as the Property Tax Cap Law).[1]

See also

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References