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Louisiana Elected Judge Qualifications, Amendment 13 (September 2006)

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Louisiana Amendment 13 (Primary), also known as the Qualifications to be Elected Judge Act, was on the September 30, 2006 primary election ballot in Louisiana as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved.[1]

Election results

Amendment 13, Primary
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 423,846 70%
No178,69030%

Text of measure

Louisiana Constitution
Flag of Louisiana.png
Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIV

The language that appeared on the ballot:

To be considered in the September 30, 2006 primary election. To provide that a person shall have been admitted to the practice of law for ten years preceding election to the supreme court or a court of appeals and for eight years preceding election to a district court, family court, parish court, or court having solely juvenile jurisdiction; and to decrease the requirement that a person be domiciled in the respective district, circuit, or parish from two years to one year preceding election. Effective January 1, 2008, and applicable to any person who is elected to the office of judge on and after January 1, 2008.

(Amends Article V, Section 24)

HOUSE BILL NO. 13, REGULAR SESSION, 2006

Present Constitution provides the qualifications for judges and requires that a judge of the supreme court, court of appeal, district court, family court, parish court, or court having solely juvenile jurisdiction shall have been admitted to the practice of law in the state of Louisiana for at least 5 years prior to his election.

Proposed Constitutional Amendment changes the qualifications for judges and requires that a person shall have been admitted to the practice of law in the state of Louisiana for at least the number of years specified as follows: (1) for the supreme court or a court of appeals--10 years; (2) for a district court, family court, parish court, or court having solely juvenile jurisdiction--8 years.

Present Constitution requires a judge to have been domiciled in the district, circuit, or parish for 2 years preceding election.

Proposed Constitutional Amendment changes the requirement for a judge to have been domiciled in the district, circuit, or parish from 2 years preceding election to 1 year preceding election.

See also

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References