Maine Compact for Maine's Forests Carry-over, Question 1 (1997)

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on Forests and Parks
Forests and parks.jpg
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Maine
LawsHistory
List of measures

The Maine Compact for Maine's Forests Carry-Over Measure, also known as Question 1: Carry-over Measure, was on the November 4, 1997 ballot in Maine as a automatic ballot referral, where it was defeated.[1] The measure would have made the Compact for Maine's Forests into law, which was to promote sustainable forests management practices.[2][3]

Background

See also: Maine Clearcutting Ban Versus Sustainable Forest Management Practices, Question 2 (1996)

This measure was originally a competing measure to an indirect initiated state statute in 1996. Although it did receive a majority of the votes in that contest, it did not receive more than half. In such a three-way contest, Maine's constitution requires that one of the options receive more than half of the votes to be approved and enacted. If no option succeeds in securing this, the measure receiving the majority is voted upon by itself at the next statewide election to be held no less than 60 days after the first vote.

Election results

Maine Question 1 (1997)
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No182,36852.56%
Yes 164,574 47.44%

Election results via: Maine State Law and Legislative Reference Library, Referenda Votes on Acts of the Maine Legislature 1910-

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[2]

Question 1: Carry-over Measure

Do you want the Compact for Maine's Forests to become law to promote sustainable forest management practices throughout the State? [4]

Path to the ballot

See also: Competing initiatives in the laws governing the initiative process in Maine

This measure was automatically referred to the ballot after receiving the majority, though not more than half, of the votes in an indirect initiated state statute measure from 1996. In such cases, Maine's constitution requires that one of the options receive more than half of the votes to be approved and enacted. If no option succeeds in securing this, the measure receiving the majority is voted upon by itself at the next statewide election to be held no less than 60 days after the first vote.

Similar measures

See also

BallotpediaAvatar bigger.png
Suggest a link

External links

References