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Maine Comprehensive Transportation Policy and Turnpike Authority, Question 1 (1991)

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The Maine Comprehensive Transportation Policy and Turnpike Authority Initiative, also known as Question 1, was on the November 5, 1991 ballot in Maine as an indirect initiated state statute, where it was approved.[1] The measure required the Maine Department of Transportation to adopt, by approximately the end of 1992, a statewide comprehensive transportation policy, which would govern all transportation planning, capital investment and project decisions by the department and the Maine Turnpike Authority. It required that a balance be found between economic, social and environmental goals. It also repealed a statute which gave the authority to widen the Maine Turnpike from two to three lanes between exists one and six-A. The measure additionally required that the budget of the Turnpike Authority be approved by the legislature, and that any surplus of that budget be transferred to the Department of Transportation for road and bridge projects. Before the passage of this measure, the authority's budget did not have to be approved and it only had to transfer surpluses in excess of $8.7 million.[2][3]

Election results

Maine Question 1 (1991)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 224,277 58.84%
No156,86141.16%

Election results via: Maine State Law and Legislative Reference Library, Votes on Initiated Bills 1980-

Text of measure

The language appeared on the ballot as:[3]

Do you favor the changes in Maine law concerning deauthorizing the widening of the Maine turnpike and establishing transportation policy proposed by citizen petition? [4]

See also

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