Maryland elections, 2012

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2013
Contents
1 2012 Elections
2 Eligibility to Vote
2.1 Primary election
2.2 General election
3 Voting absentee
3.1 Eligibility
3.2 Deadlines
3.3 Military and overseas voting
4 Voting early
5 See also
6 References

The state of Maryland held elections in 2012. Below are the dates of note:

On the 2012 ballot Click here for all
November 6, 2012
Election Results
U.S. Senate (1 seat) Approveda Preview Article
U.S. House (8 seats) Approveda
State Executives Defeatedd N/A
State Senate Defeatedd N/A
State House Defeatedd
Ballot measures (

7 measures)

Approveda Preview Article Pending

2012 Elections

Note: Election information listed on this page does not pertain to 2012 presidential elections. For more about Ballotpedia's areas of coverage, click here.
For election results in the 50 states, see our November 6, 2012 election results page

Elections by type

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See also: United States Senate elections in Maryland, 2012
U.S. Senate, Maryland General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngBen Cardin Incumbent 56% 1,474,028
     Republican Dan Bongino 26.3% 693,291
     Libertarian Dean Ahmad 1.2% 32,252
     Independent Rob Sobhani 16.4% 430,934
     Democratic Lih Young (Write-in) 0% 163
     Republican Mary Podlesak (Write-in) 0% 21
     Independent Brandy Baker 0% 151
     Independent Ed Tinus 0% 48
     N/A Other Write-ins 0.1% 2,346
Total Votes 2,633,234
Source: Maryland State Board of Elections "U.S. Senator"

See also: Maryland 2012 ballot measures
Type Title Subject Description Result
LRCA Question 1 Judicial reform Prescribes different qualifications for judges of the Orphans' Court for Prince George's County Approveda


LRCA Question 2 Judicial reform Prescribes different qualifications for judges of the Orphans' Court for Baltimore County Approveda


LRCA Question 3 Law Specifies condition under which and elected official convicted of a felony or certain misdemeanors is to be removed form office Approveda


VR Question 4 Education Would approve legislation that guarantees in-state tuition to illegal immigrants Approveda


VR Question 5 Redistricting Would approve Maryland's congressional redistricting plan passed in October 2011. Approveda


VR Question 6 Marriage Would approve a law that allows same-sex couples to obtain a civil marriage license. Approveda


LRSS Question 7 Gambling Allows the construction of a new casino in Prince George's County. Approveda


Eligibility to Vote

Maryland

Primary election

See also: Voting in the 2012 primary elections

Maryland is one of 21 states to use a strictly closed primary system. Voters must have registered to vote in the primary by March 13, 2012, which was 21 days before the primary took place. Parties can choose to open primaries, but both Democrats and Republicans chose not to. If a voter does not choose a party, he or she is recorded as "unaffiliated" and is only permitted to vote in the primary election if a party chooses to open its primary.(Information about registering to vote)

General election

See also: Voting in the 2012 general elections

The deadline to register to vote is 21 days prior to the election day, which in 2012 was October 16.[1]

Voting absentee

AbsenteeMap.png
See also: Absentee Voting

Eligibility

All voters are eligible to vote absentee in Maryland. There are no special eligibility requirements for voting absentee.[3]

Deadlines

To vote absentee, an absentee ballot application must be received by the election office at least seven days prior to the election. A returned absentee ballot must then be postmarked on or before election day if submitted by mail. Ballots can also be returned in person until 8 p.m. on election day.[3]

Military and overseas voting

For full details, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program here.

Voting early

See also: Early voting

Maryland is one of 33 states that has early voting with no specific requirements as to who can vote early. Early voting begins on the second Thursday prior to election and ends on the Thursday before the election.[4] The average number of days prior to an election that voters can cast an early ballot is 21 days in states with a definitive starting date.

See also

References