Maryland gubernatorial and lieutenant gubernatorial election, 2014

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Maryland Gubernatorial and Lieutenant Gubernatorial Election

Primary Date:
June 24, 2014

General Election Date:
November 4, 2014

November 4 Election Winners:
Larry Hogan Republican Party
Boyd Rutherford Republican Party
Incumbents prior to election:
Gov. Martin O'Malley Democratic Party
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown Democratic Party
Gov. Martin O'Malley
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown
Maryland State Executive Elections
Top Ballot
Governor Lieutenant Governor
Attorney General
Down Ballot
Controller

Lost trifecta for Democrats
WhoRunsTheStates Badge.jpg
State executive offices in Maryland
Flag of Maryland.png
The Maryland gubernatorial and lieutenant gubernatorial election took place on November 4, 2014, following a primary on June 24, 2014. Martin O'Malley and Anthony Brown were first elected in 2006. O'Malley was ineligible to run for re-election in 2014 due to term limits and Brown is seeking to replace him as governor. Brown and running mate Ken Ulman faced the Republican ticket of Larry Hogan and Boyd Rutherford and the Libertarian Party ticket of Shawn Quinn and Lorenzo Gaztanaga. Hogan and Rutherford won in the general election.

Maryland is one of 21 states with a mixed primary system. Parties decide who may vote in their primary election and generally close it to all voters except those registered with their party.[1]

The state lost trifecta status because Hogan and Rutherford won the 2014 election. Before the general election, both legislative chambers and the governor's seat were controlled by the Democratic Party, earning it the label of a state government trifecta. Learn more about the latest developments in state government trifectas by clicking here.

Candidates

General election

Democratic Party Anthony Brown/Ken Ulman[2][3]
Republican Party Larry Hogan/Boyd Rutherford[4] Green check mark transparent.png
Libertarian Party Shawn Quinn/Lorenzo Gaztanaga[5]

Lost in primary

Democratic Party Doug Gansler/Jolene Ivey[6][7]
Democratic Party Ralph Jaffe/Freda Jaffe[4][8]
Democratic Party Heather Mizeur/Delman Coates[9][10][11]
Democratic Party Charles Smith/Clarence Tucker[4]
Democratic Party Cindy Walsh/Mary Elizabeth Wingate-Pennacchia[4]
Republican Party David Craig/Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio[12][13][14]
Republican Party Ron George/Shelley Aloi[15][16][17]
Republican Party Charles Lollar/Ken Timmerman[18]

Disqualified

Republican Party Brian Vaeth/Duane "Shorty" Davis[19][20]

Declined

Republican Party Blaine Young[21]
Republican Party Meyer Marks[22]

Results

General election

Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngLarry Hogan/Boyd Rutherford 51.2% 884,400
     Democratic Anthony Brown/Ken Ulman 47.4% 818,890
     Libertarian Shawn Quinn/Lorenzo Gaztanaga 1.5% 25,382
     Nonpartisan Write-in votes 0% 303
Total Votes 1,728,975
Election Results via Maryland State Board of Elections.

Primary election

Democratic primary

Governor of Maryland, Democratic Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAnthony Brown/Ken Ulman 51.4% 249,398
Douglas Gansler/Jolene Ivey 24.2% 117,383
Heather Mizeur/Delman Coates 21.6% 104,721
Cindy Walsh/Mary Elizabeth Wingate-Pennacchia 1.4% 6,863
Charles Smith/Clarence Tucker 0.7% 3,507
Ralph Jaffe/Freda Jaffe 0.7% 3,221
Total Votes 485,093
Election Results Via:Maryland State Board of Elections.

Republican primary

Governor of Maryland, Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngLarry Hogan/Boyd Rutherford 43% 92,376
David Craig/Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio 29.1% 62,639
Charles Lollar/Ken Timmerman 15.5% 33,292
Ron George/Shelley Aloi 12.4% 26,628
Total Votes 214,935
Election Results Via:Maryland State Board of Elections.

Race background

Democratic nomination

Incumbent Martin O'Malley (D) was prevented by term limits from seeking a third consecutive term in office.

Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown officially launched his 2014 gubernatorial campaign on May 10, 2013. If he would have won, Brown would have been the first lieutenant governor (since the lieutenant governor's office was created in 1970) and first black candidate to be elected governor of Maryland.[20][23] O'Malley, with whom Brown shared winning tickets in both the 2006 and 2010 elections, supported Brown as his successor.[24] Brown's lieutenant gubernatorial running-mate is Howard County Executive Ken Ulman.[3] Immediately after formalizing their partnership for the 2014 campaign, the Brown-Ulman ticket received the endorsement of U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD). A number of Cumming's congressional colleagues announced their support soon thereafter, as well as influential branches of SEIU, a major labor union.[25][26][27]

On July 17, 2013, another potentially history-making candidate entered the Democratic primary field to give Brown some competition: Maryland House Delegate Heather Mizeur.[28] Mizeur would have been the first female Governor of Maryland, as well as the country's first openly gay governor, if she had won the general election.[29] Current state attorney general Doug Gansler also sought the Democratic nomination for governor in 2014. On Oct. 14, 2013, Gansler selected Prince George County Delegate Jolene Ivey as his lieutenant gubernatorial running-mate. Keeping with the trailblazer theme established earlier by Brown and Mizeur to entice more progressive-leaning voters, the Gansler-Ivey ticket also carried the promise of setting an historical record, statewide and national. After joining Gansler's campaign, Ivey stated, "I am proud to be the first African-American woman to run for lieutenant governor, and when we win, to be the first Democratic African-American woman to be lieutenant governor in our nation's history."[30] Both Gansler and Mizeur lost in the Democratic primary on June 24, 2014.

Republican nomination

The Republican ticket of Larry Hogan and Boyd Rutherford emerged from a field of four potential tickets after the June 24 primary. The winning ticket managed a 14-percent margin of victory over Harford County Executive David Craig and state Delegate Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio. Hogan and Rutherford were both former appointees of former Gov. Robert Ehrlich (R).[31]

Campaign issues

Change Maryland inquiry

Republican candidate Larry Hogan was the subject of a complaint to the Maryland State Board of Elections, related to potential assistance of the candidate by Change Maryland. The political communications group, which was created by Hogan in 2011, had been accused of conducting polls and providing resources during Hogan's exploration of a gubernatorial bid. The complaint was filed by David Craig and Ron George, who were defeated by Hogan in the Republican primary on June 24, 2014. The state board dismissed the complaint in July, determining that Hogan likely received assistance from Change Maryland but the board lacked oversight over candidates prior to official filings.[32]

The Maryland Democratic Party filed a new claim regarding Hogan's relationship with Change Maryland on July 24. This complaint alleged that the poll referenced in the earlier complaint cost $10,000, which represented an illegal in-kind contribution to Hogan. Hogan's campaign spokesman, Adam Dubitsky, countered that the Democratic complaint was an effort to distract from changing political fortunes for the party's candidate, Lt. Governor Anthony Brown.[33]

Super PAC accusations

The Maryland State Board of Elections received a complaint from Hogan on September 4, alleging coordination between Brown's campaign and a political action committee (PAC) called "One State, One Future." Hogan's filing cited a conflict of interest for Brown consultant Colleen Martin-Lauer, who also consulted with the union-funded PAC. The complaint also pointed to Susan Smith-Bauk, a consultant to lieutenant gubernatorial candidate Ken Ulman who also worked with "One State, One Future." Hogan's campaign manager, Steve Crim, argued at the time of filing that both consultants could not avoid coordination between their different employers based on the nature of their work.[34]

The state board issued guidelines in January 2014 that prohibited communication between super PACs, which could collect unlimited funds for the purpose of advocating a political position or candidates, and political campaigns. These guidelines prevent coordination over "advertising, messaging, strategy, polling, research, or allocation of resources." Hogan's complaint claimed that the Martin-Lauer example was a "blatant example of illegal coordination" because of overlapping interests in fundraising for the campaign and the super PAC. State election officials were investigating the complaint as of September 10, 2014.[34]

Campaign finance

Hogan reported three times more cash on hand than Brown in the campaign finance reporting period ending on August 19, 2014. Hogan had $2.4 million in cash on hand, compared to $760,000 for the Brown campaign. The disparity was due to Hogan's commitment to a publicly financed campaign, which meant a single payment of $2.6 million from the state's dedicated campaign finance fund. Hogan could not raise additional money in the campaign, while Brown was capable of raising additional funds by not committing to public financing. Brown reported $1.5 million in contributions from June 9 through August 19.[35]

National figures in the race

As poll results between Brown and Hogan narrowed in October, national political figures toured the state to influence the outcome of the gubernatorial race. President Barack Obama, former President Bill Clinton and former Sen. Hillary Clinton made appearances supporting Brown's campaign. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie appeared at three campaign events for Hogan through late October.[36]

Outside groups also spent lavishly on ads during the general election campaign. The Democratic Governors Association and the Republican Governors Association invested $1.5 million on TV ads through late October. Michael Bloomberg's Independence USA PAC committed $500,000 to criticize Hogan's endorsement by the National Rifle Association (NRA). [36]


Debates

October 18 debate

Anthony Brown (D) and Larry Hogan (R) clashed over education, economic policy and fracking during a debate on Maryland Public Television. Brown advocated for expanding pre-K schooling as a solution to academic performance issues. Hogan countered that the key to Maryland's education future is the expansion of charter schools. Hogan, the owner of a real estate company, criticized Brown and current Gov. Martin O'Malley for "crushing small businesses" over the past eight years. Brown countered that he would work toward tax relief for small businesses if elected governor.[37]

The issue of fracking in western Maryland showed clear divisions between the two candidates. Hogan was enthusiastic in his support for natural gas extraction in the state, citing "an enormous gold mine" of energy resources that could boost the state's economic prospects. Brown touted the current administration's focus on gathering safety and environmental reports about fracking in the state to avoid long-term impacts on nearby communities.[37]

Polls

General election
All candidates

General election match-ups
Poll Anthony Brown (D) Larry Hogan (R)Shawn Quinn (L)UndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
OnMessage Inc.
(August 18-19, 2014)
45%42%4%9%+/-4.38500
Gonzales Research and Associates
(September 16-23, 2014)
47%43%1%9%+/-3.5805
Washington Post/University of Maryland
(October 2-5, 2014)
47%38%4%11%+/-51,005
Gonzales Research & Marketing
(October 20-24, 2014)
46%44%2%8%+/-3.5822
AVERAGES 46.25% 41.75% 2.75% 9.25% +/-4.1 783
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

Major-party candidates

General election: Brown v. Hogan
Poll Anthony Brown Larry HoganUndecided/OtherMargin of ErrorSample Size
WPA Research
(October 19-20, 2014)
42%41%15%+/-4.4500
New York Times/CBS News/YouGov
(October 16-23, 2014)
51%38%11%+/-51,086
WPA Research
(October 26-27, 2014)
39%44%14%+/-4.4504
AVERAGES 44% 41% 13.33% +/-4.6 696.67
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.

Primary and hypothetical match-ups

Primary trial heats for 2014 gubernatorial race
Poll Anthony Brown Doug GanslerHeather MizeurUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Brown-Ulman Internal Poll conducted by Garin-Hart-Yang
(September 11-15, 2013)
43%21%5%31%+/-4.0608
Gonzales Research/Marketing Strategies Poll
(October 1-14, 2013)
41%21%5%33%+/--403
Baltimore Sun Poll
(February 8-12, 2014)
35%14%10%40%+/-4.4500
Washington Post Poll
(February 13-16, 2014)
32%15%9%39%+/-3.51,002
The Maryland Poll
(April 10-13, 2014)
27%11%8%54%+/-3.17954
WPA Opinion Research
(May 6-7,2014)
34%20%7%40%+/-4.9400
AVERAGES 35.33% 17% 7.33% 39.5% +/-1.86 644.5
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.
Primary trial heats for 2014 gubernatorial race
Poll Anthony Brown Doug GanslerPeter FranchotKen UlmanNot sureMargin of ErrorSample Size
Garin-Heart-Young Poll
(September 13-14, 2012)
31%18%14%4%33%+/-4.4504
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.
Primary trial heats for 2014 gubernatorial race
Poll Anthony Brown Doug GanslerKen UlmanNot sureMargin of ErrorSample Size
Garin-Heart-Young Poll
(September 13-14, 2012)
37%23%5%33%+/-4.4504
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.


Primary trial heats for 2014 gubernatorial race
Poll Anthony Brown Doug GanslerNot sureMargin of ErrorSample Size
Garin-Heart-Young Poll
(September 13-14, 2012)
41%25%34%+/-4.4504
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.


Hypothetical Match-up Brown vs. Hogan
Poll Anthony Brown Larry HoganNot sureMargin of ErrorSample Size
WPA Opinion Research
(May 6-7,2014)
42%35%23%+/-4.9400
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org.


Campaign media

Anthony Brown


Anthony Brown ad: Mission

Anthony Brown ad: Never Stop

Anthony Brown ad: Universal

Anthony Brown ad: I Know

Larry Hogan


Larry Hogan ad: Weak Leadership

Larry Hogan ad: Jaymi

Larry Hogan ad: Deserve Better

Outside groups

Democratic Governors Association


DGA ad: Dangerous

DGA ad: Take A Risk

DGA ad: Mush

Republican Governors Association


RGA ad: Picture Perfect

Past elections

2010

Maryland Gubernatorial/Lieutenant Gubernatorial General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin O'Malley/Anthony G. Brown Incumbent 56.2% 1,044,961
     Republican Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr./Mary Kane 41.8% 776,319
     Libertarian Susan J. Gaztanaga/Doug McNeil 0.8% 14,137
     Green Maria Allwine/Ken Eidel 0.6% 11,825
     Constitution Eric Delano Knowles/Michael T. Hargadon 0.5% 8,612
     Democratic Ralph Jaffe (Write-In) 0% 319
     Unaffiliated Corrogan R. Vaughan/Jim Crawford 0% 179
     Other Write-Ins Various 0.1% 1,528
Total Votes 1,857,880
Election Results Via: Maryland State Board of Elections

2006

Maryland Gubernatorial/Lieutenant Gubernatorial General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngMartin O'Malley/Anthony G. Brown 52.7% 942,279
     Republican Ehrlich/Cox Incumbent 46.2% 825,464
     Green Boyd/Madigan 0.9% 15,551
     Populist Driscoll/Rothstein 0.2% 3,481
     Republican Simmins/Hargadon (Write-In) 0% 258
     Democratic Ralph Jaffe (Write-In) 0% 16
     Democratic Smith/Wilkes (Write-In) 0% 61
     Other Write-Ins Various 0.1% 1,206
Total Votes 1,788,316
Election Results Via: Maryland State Board of Elections

Voter turnout

Political scientist Michael McDonald's United States Elections Project studied voter turnout in the 2014 election by looking at the percentage of eligible voters who headed to the polls. McDonald used voting-eligible population (VEP), or the number of eligible voters independent of their current registration status, to calculate turnout rates in each state on November 4. He also incorporated ballots cast for the highest office in each state into his calculation. He estimated that 82,596,338 ballots were cast in the 50 states plus the District of Columbia, representing 36.4 percent of the VEP.[38] By comparison, 61.6 percent of VEP voted in the 2008 presidential election and 58.2 percent of VEP voted in the 2012 presidential election.[39]

Quick facts

  • According to PBS Newshour, voter turnout in the 2014 midterms was the lowest since the 1942 midterms, which took place during the nation's involvement in World War II.[40]
  • Forty-three states and the District of Columbia failed to surpass 50 percent turnout in McDonald's analysis.
  • The three states with the lowest turnout according to McDonald's analysis were Indiana (28 percent), Texas (28.5 percent) and Utah (28.8 percent).
  • Maine (59.3 percent), Wisconsin (56.9 percent) and Alaska (55.3 percent) were the three states with the highest turnout.
  • There were only 12 states that increased voter turnout in 2014 compared to the 2010 midterm elections.[41]
Voter turnout rates, 2014
State Total votes for top office  % voter eligible population Top statewide office up for election Size of lead (Raw votes) Size of lead (%)
Alabama 1,200,000 33.5 Governor 320,319 27.2
Alaska 290,000 55.3 Governor 4,004 1.6
Arizona 1,550,000 34.4 Governor 143,951 12.5
Arkansas 875,000 41.2 Governor 118,664 14
California 7,750,000 31.8 Governor 1,065,748 17.8
Colorado 2,025,000 53.0 Governor 50,395 2.4
Connecticut 1,089,880 42.3 Governor 26,603 2.5
Delaware 234,038 34.4 Attorney general 31,155 13.6
District of Columbia 150,000 30.3 Mayor 27,934 19
Florida 5,951,561 42.7 Governor 66,127 1.1
Georgia 2,575,000 38.2 Governor 202,685 8
Hawaii 366,125 36.2 Governor 45,323 12.4
Idaho 440,000 39.1 Governor 65,852 14.9
Illinois 3,550,000 39.5 Governor 171,900 4.9
Indiana 1,350,000 28.0 Secretary of state 234,978 17.8
Iowa 1,150,000 50.6 Governor 245,548 21.8
Kansas 875,000 42.8 Governor 33,052 3.9
Kentucky 1,440,000 44.2 U.S. Senate 222,096 15.5
Louisiana 1,472,039 43.8 U.S. Senate 16,401 1.1
Maine 625,000 59.3 Governor 29,820 4.9
Maryland 1,750,000 41.9 Governor 88,648 6.1
Massachusetts 2,150,000 43.9 Governor 40,361 1.9
Michigan 3,151,835 42.7 Governor 129,547 4.3
Minnesota 2,025,000 51.3 Governor 109,776 5.6
Mississippi 650,000 29.7 U.S. Senate 141,234 33
Missouri 1,450,000 32.3 Auditor 684,074 53.6
Montana 365,000 46.1 U.S. Senate 65,262 17.9
Nebraska 550,000 41.3 Governor 97,678 18.7
Nevada 600,000 31.8 Governor 255,793 46.7
New Hampshire 500,000 48.8 Governor 24,924 5.2
New Jersey 1,825,000 30.4 N/A N/A N/A
New Mexico 550,000 38.3 Governor 73,868 14.6
New York 3,900,000 28.8 Governor 476,252 13.4
North Carolina 2,900,000 40.7 U.S. Senate 48,511 1.7
North Dakota 248,670 43.8 U.S. House At-large seat 42,214 17.1
Ohio 3,150,000 36.2 Governor 933,235 30.9
Oklahoma 825,000 29.8 Governor 122,060 14.7
Oregon 1,500,000 52 Governor 59,029 4.5
Pennsylvania 3,500,000 36.1 Governor 339,261 9.8
Rhode Island 325,000 41.7 Governor 14,346 4.5
South Carolina 1,246,301 34.8 Governor 179,089 14.6
South Dakota 279,412 44.5 Governor 124,865 45.1
Tennessee 1,400,000 29.1 Governor 642,214 47.5
Texas 4,750,000 28.5 Governor 957,973 20.4
Utah 550,000 28.8 Attorney general 173,819 35.2
Vermont 193,087 38.8 Governor 2,095 1.1
Virginia 2,200,000 36.7 U.S. Senate 16,727 0.8
Washington 2,050,000 41.6 N/A N/A N/A
West Virginia 460,000 31.8 U.S. Senate 124,667 27.6
Wisconsin 2,425,000 56.9 Governor 137,607 5.7
Wyoming 168,390 38.7 Governor 52,703 33.6
United States 82,596,338 36.4

Note: Information from the United States Elections Project was last updated on November 19, 2014. The results in this table draw from unofficial results as of November 12, 2014.

Key deadlines

Deadline Event
February 25, 2014 Last day to file candidacy for primary election
June 24, 2014 Primary election
November 4, 2014 General election
December 9, 2014 Certification of results[42]
January 5, 2015 Inauguration day for attorney general
January 21, 2015 Inauguration day for other state executive officials

Ballotpedia reports

To learn more about developments in these races, check out the following news articles from Ballotpedia:

Recent news

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Maryland Gubernatorial Election News Feed

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See also

External links

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Suggest a link

References

  1. Maryland State Board of Elections Website, "Primary Elections," accessed January 3, 2014
  2. Examiner.com, "Filed for 2014 Maryland governor expands," May 28, 2012
  3. 3.0 3.1 The Washington Post, "New candidates to step forward Monday in Maryland’s race for governor," June 2, 2013
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Maryland State Board of Elections, 2014 Gubernatorial Primary Election State Candidates List, February 26, 2014
  5. Libertarian Party of Maryland, "2014 Candidates," accessed December 16, 2013
  6. WBAL.com, "Gansler announces runningmate," October 14, 2013
  7. Baltimore News Journal, "Attorney General Doug Gansler kicks off bid for governor," September 23, 2013
  8. Vote for Ralph Jaffe, Home, accessed December 23, 2013
  9. Washington Post, "Del. Heather Mizeur selects the Rev. Delman Coates as running-mate," November 13, 2013
  10. Baltimore Sun, "Mizeur makes smart moves as candidate for governor," November 14, 2013
  11. The Huffington Post, "Heather Mizeur Running For Governor Of Maryland," July 17, 2013
  12. The Washington Post, "Craig touts experience, takes aim at taxes in advance of run for Md. governor," May 31, 2013
  13. David Craig.com, "Main page," accessed May 30, 2012
  14. Southern Maryland Newspapers Online, Craig announces gubernatorial running mate, July 17, 2013
  15. The Capital Gazette, "Maryland GOP Del. Ron George to run for governor," April 30, 2013
  16. Maryland Reporter, "Ron George runs for governor," June 5, 2013
  17. WBAL.com, "Delegate To Run For Governor," June 1, 2013
  18. '"Charles Lollar for Governor 2014 Official Campaign Website, "Homepage," accessed September 9, 2013
  19. WBAL Radio, "Ex-Firefighter & Activist Form First GOP Ticket For Governor," May 7, 2013
  20. 20.0 20.1 WBAL Radio, "Brown Kicks Off Bid for Governor Today," May 10, 2013
  21. Frederick News Post, "Young announces bid or governor," May 27, 2012
  22. Meyer Marks for Maryland Official 2014 Campaign website, "Homepage," accessed July 18, 2013
  23. The Washington Post, "Steele Running Against History," August 7, 2005
  24. Washington Blade, "Exclusive: Mizeur eyeing run for Maryland governor," November 14, 2012
  25. Brown-Ulman 2014 Official campaign website, "News: 'SEIU Maryland-DC State Council Endorses Anthony Brown and Ken Ulman,'" September 30, 2013
  26. The Washington Post, "Mikulski says she's 'ready to get into it' to help elect Anthony Brown as governor," September 22, 2013
  27. The Washington Post, Hoyer to announce support of Brown in Maryland 2014 race for governor, July 17, 2013
  28. The Huffington Post, Heather Mizeur Running For Governor Of Maryland , July 17, 2013
  29. SoMdNews, "Mizeur makes gubernatorial bid official," July 17, 2013
  30. Wbal.com, "Gansler announces runningmate," October 14, 2013
  31. Hogan for Governor, "Meet Boyd," accessed September 8, 2014
  32. The Washington Post, "Md. elections board says group benefited GOP’s Hogan but tosses rivals’ complaint," July 10, 2014
  33. The Washington Post, "Md. Democratic Party files complaint targeting GOP candidate Larry Hogan," July 24, 2014
  34. 34.0 34.1 The Washington Post, "Larry Hogan accuses Brown’s campaign of illegally coordinating with a Super PAC," September 8, 2014
  35. Herald-Mail Media, " Public funding gives Hogan lead in campaign money," August 27, 2014
  36. 36.0 36.1 The Baltimore Sun, "Maryland's governor race sparks national interest," October 27, 2014
  37. 37.0 37.1 The Washington Post, "Candidates’ frustrations on display in final Md. gubernatorial debate," October 18, 2014
  38. United States Elections Project, "2014 November General Election Turnout Rates," November 7, 2014
  39. TIME, "Voter Turnout in Midterm Elections Hits 72-Year Low," November 10, 2014
  40. PBS, "2014 midterm election turnout lowest in 70 years," November 10, 2014
  41. U.S. News & World Report, "Midterm Turnout Down in 2014," November 5, 2014
  42. Maryland State Board of Elections, "2014 Election Calendar," May 13, 2014